GoldieBlox Makes AMAZING Commercial For Girl Engineers

The GoldieBlox girls are back and more amazing than ever.

Debbie Sterling, a female engineer, decided to create GoldieBlox after realizing that toys for girls rarely focused on things related to the engineering field. Its no wonder that 90% of engineering jobs are held by men when women were never given the opportunity to explore the field as a child.

As children, we were not given legos, lincoln blocks, or robots to build. We were given dress-up barbies, build-a-bears and fake makeup kits. While there is absolutely nothing wrong with bears and barbies, Sterling wanted to create toys to inspire girls who may have some interest in engineering. She simply wanted the option to be available. Her website describes her creation as follows:

GoldieBlox is a series of interactive books + construction toys starring Goldie, a curious girl with a love of engineering. Goldie’s stories encourage girls to build, developing the spatial skills that are fundamental to engineering. As she goes on adventures with her friends, she comes across problems that she must solve by building simple machines. As the story unfolds, the girls get to build what Goldie builds. Through the downloadable e-book app, kids get to hear the story narrated and receive helpful hints and tips to enrich the building experience.

 

The girls are back and ready to show off their incredible engineering skills. Check out the amazing commercial below. You can also vote here to help GoldieBlox win a chance at airing their commercial in the Super Bowl.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UFpe3Up9T_g

LYRICS:

Girls.
You think you know what we want, girls.
Pink and pretty it’s girls.
Just like the 50′s it’s girls.

You like to buy us pink toys
and everything else is for boys
and you can always get us dolls
and we’ll grow up like them… false.

It’s time to change.
We deserve to see a range.
‘Cause all our toys look just the same
and we would like to use our brains.

We are all more than princess maids.

Girls to build the spaceship,
Girls to code the new app,
Girls to grow up knowing
they can engineer that.

Girls.
That’s all we really need is Girls.
To bring us up to speed it’s Girls.
Our opportunity is Girls.
Don’t underestimate Girls.

Move Over, Barbie: Lego Debuts Its First Female Scientist

We can all let out a collective cheer for one of the newest additions to the Lego family. Professor C. Bodin, according to her name tag, is Lego’s first female scientist. The best part? The model is simply labeled “Scientist” as opposed to “Female Scientist” or “Girl Scientist,” and does not pander to gender stereotypes by, say, making her pink.

This is certainly a step forward for Lego, which has been criticized for focusing too much on their male customers. The sex-ratio for the minifigure models is 4:1 in favor of males, and female minifigures tend to cater to gender stereotypes. (Their “Friends” minifigures are more shapely and have stereotypical “feminine colors and storylines.”)

Though Professor C. Bodin may be the first female scientist in the Lego universe, according to Scientific American, she is not the first female minifigure with a career in science, technology, engineering or math. Lego released a doctor (complete with pigtails) in the 1970s, as well as a female astronaut in the 1990s as a part of its Ice Planet 2002 series.

With Professor C. Bodin, Lego seems to be taking a small step in the right direction. In the meantime, we can look to others who are fighting to ensure equality in children’s toys.

(source)

 

 

Chinese Factory Workers and “The Real Toy Story”

Nearly 75% of the worlds toys are made in China. With so many of these plastic toys available to us at ease, we often forget the hard labor that goes into making them. Chinese factory workers must spend hours assembling, stuffing, painting, and working diligently to live up to the never-ending demands from the West.

Michael Wolf, a German photographer pursuing his career in Asia, decided to use his talents to remind us of the struggle that goes into making these toys. His website states:

“Wolf developed the idea around plastic toys, a fascination of his since they were off limits to him as a child. Over a period of one month, he collected over twenty thousand toys “made in China,” scavenging through second-hand stores and flea markets up and down the California coast. He transformed this vast collection into an installation, The Real Toy Story, which integrates portraits of workers in china’s toy factories into a series of walls covered entirely in plastic toys of all kinds. The result is an overwhelming, immersive experience; a graphic representation of the gargantuan scale of china’s mass production and the west’s hunger for a never-ending supply of disposable products. The gazes of the factory workers humanize this anonymous ocean of toys and invite us to reflect on the reality of trade in a world of consumer-driven globalization.”

Wolf effectively reminds us of the various faces that work endlessly to produce these items that we often take for granted. To get a full look at this series, click here.

toy story 2 toy story 3 toy story 4 toy story 5 toy story 6 toy story 7 toy story 8 toy story 9 toy story 10 toy story 11 toy story 12 toy story 13

 

A Future For Female Engineers

There seems to be no argument here- the engineer world is dominated by males. When I was an undergrad in college, this fact became extremely obvious. In an engineer lecture room, you could count the female engineer students on a single hand. At one point, I began questioning this myself. Why was it so uncommon to find a woman interested in this field? Why do men hold nearly 90% of engineering jobs? Why did I never even think to consider this route?

A trip to any toy store may actually hold the answer. As a young girl, I didn’t come home from the toy store with legos, lincoln blocks, or robots you could build for battle. I came home with dress-up barbies, build-a-bears, and fake make-up kits. Now don’t get me wrong- I don’t have a problem with these toys. If a child wants to dress up a doll and play with its hair, I think its completely fine. Instead, the problem is simply that the opportunity to go out and explore is not available. As a young girl, I didn’t even have the option to see what was there for me outside of pink and glitter.  I realized that I never considered being an engineer because I was never programmed to have any sort of interest in the field.

Debbie Sterling, a female engineer, went through the very same epiphany. She decided she wanted to change her male-dominated workplace and just like that, GoldieBlox was created. The toy company aims to inspire the future generation of female engineers by creating construction toys that appeal to girls.

“GoldieBlox is a series of interactive books + construction toys starring Goldie, a curious girl with a love of engineering. Goldie’s stories encourage girls to build, developing the spatial skills that are fundamental to engineering. As she goes on adventures with her friends, she comes across problems that she must solve by building simple machines. As the story unfolds, the girls get to build what Goldie builds. Through the downloadable e-book app, kids get to hear the story narrated and receive helpful hints and tips to enrich the building experience.”

Check out the inspiring commercial as well as Debbie Sterling’s story below. To learn more about GoldieBlox, check out their official blog here.