3-D Printed Superhero Prosthetics For Children

 

A lot of kids dream about being a superhero right? Well, a non-profit organization called E-Nabling The Future, which designs and prints prosthetic fingers and hands for people in need, is utilizing 3-D printing to get some children one step closer to that dream. The idea behind the project is simple enough: Why have a plain prosthetic arm when you can have Wolverine claws attached to them? At least that was how Aaron Brown felt.

Brown, a 3-D printing enthusiast in Michigan, volunteers for E-Nabling The Future alongside others volunteers including engineers, physical therapists, designers, and people who are simply interested in the development and creation of low-cost prosthetic limbs for children. Brown introduced the modified prosthetic during the Grand Rapids Maker Faire and (as expected) it was an absolute hit. As Huffington Post very correctly points out, “Just because you’re missing a hand, doesn’t mean you can’t be a superhero.”

“People’s faces just lit up!” Brown said in an interview. “The kids went crazy over it. And don’t worry … the claws aren’t sharp! They are rounded plastic and just stick on and off with velcro.”

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Recently, 3-year-old Rayden “Bubba” Kahae got to experience becoming a superhero (the E-Nabling way). Kahae was born with Amniotic Band Syndrome, which caused his right hand to develop without fingers. Thanks to E-Nable, he now has an Iron Man prosthetic hand.

Best of all, the prosthetic was within the family’s budget. Other commercially-made prosthetic hands can cost upwards of $40,000, but Kahae’s 3-D printed Iron Man hand only cost $50 to build and was sent to him for free.

 

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Marvel’s New Pakistani Superhero

Lets face it– the presence of Asians in American media is not as prominent as we’d like. In fact, this number gets even smaller when we look at specific categories like the comicbook world. Luckily, this seems to be slowly, but surely changing.

We had put together a list of Asians in Comics to celebrate the Asian creators and characters who are making strides in the comicbook world and it looks like we have another big addition to make on this list.

Recently, Marvel Comics has revealed their reimagined version of the character, Ms. Marvel. Much to our delight, this hero’s alter ego is not a white, male millionaire. The new Ms. Marvel is 16-year-old Kamala Khan, a Pakistani-American Muslim teenager.

Comics writer G. Willow Wilson says that Kahn “struggles to reconcile being an American teenager with the conservative customs of her Pakistani Muslim family. Like a lot of children of immigrants, she feels torn between two worlds: the family she loves, but which drives her crazy, and her peers, who don’t really understand what her home life is like.”

Creators say they will stray away from the “token minority” character and instead deal with some very deep personal struggles.

Of course, creators recognize the risks that accompany Khan’s character. Will others be against her ethnic background and religious beliefs? Will Pakistani or Muslim individuals feel a misrepresentation with this character?

The comic’s editor Sana Amanat admits, “I do expect some negativity, not only from people who are anti-Muslim, but people who are Muslim and might want the character portrayed in a particular light.”

But creators have decided to be brave and go through with the character. In fact, they claim they will address the various labels that society places on Kahn and show how such labels affect her sense of self.

Kahn is the first Muslim character to headline a book at Marvel. Ms. Marvel will launch in February 2014 and we simply cannot wait.

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(source)