Audrey Living | Entertaining: A Summer Tableau

Summer may bring to mind barbecues and pool parties, but why sacrifice style for a warm weather fête when all it takes is a few details to lighten up any look? Here, some experts show us how we can bring summer to two very different décor styles.

 

ISSUE: Summer 2012

DEPT: Audrey Living

PHOTO: Callaway Gable

STYLISTS: Carpe Diem Special Events and Designs; Rrivre Works, Inc.

FLOWERS: Mille Flori Floral Design

VENUE: Rrivre Works, Inc.

 

“When you’re thinking of a summer dinner with friends, it is always nice to give your guests the unexpected,” says Slomique Hawrylo, who runs Carpe Diem, an event planning company, with partner Alice Chung. Always consider your surroundings when planning your tablescape, says Hawrylo. If you’ve got access to a great outdoor setting with a breathtaking view, you’re practically done. But if you’re working with an indoor venue, Hawrylo suggests an eye-catching print accenting the wall behind your table setting, like a bold damask design. Setting up a striking backdrop is easy to achieve, she adds. “Just purchase a large amount of fabric from your local fabric store and hang it flush to the wall accenting your tablescape.”

Against a sophisticated black and white backdrop, Hawrylo finds it important to make sure accent pieces are “wow pieces.” She suggests “sprinkling in a little summer brightness with a crisp apple green,” like vintage-inspired stemware and napkins. Don’t be afraid to mix and match modern and vintage styles of stemware in varying shades of your accent color. “Your guests will be impressed by the wonderful play on colors,” she says.

Florist Gina Kim-Park of Mille Fiori Floral Design continued the apple green theme by accenting each table setting with green cymbidium orchid blooms. She also used “modern baroque-style” mirrored trays for the charger. “You can purchase any cool picture frame to use as chargers for any dinner setting,” she adds.

To play off the bold damask backdrop, Kim-Park created an oversized garland with white and black paper flowers. She created one centerpiece with a white paper flower bloom accented with green moss balls, and another utilizing white akito roses meandering down a tall ceramic vase. As for setting up the layout of your dinner party, never feel that you are confined to the conventional table, says Hawrylo. “If you have a unique bar at your home, and you want your guests to experience a modern way of having a dinner party, have the entire evening themed around the bar. Your place settings, conversation and, of course, drinks will all take place at this unconventional table.”

If you’re working with a more traditional dining setting, bring summer inside — in an enchanted-forest- midsummer-night’s-dream type of way. This dreamy tablescape was created around the Montage Table, which features a magnolia tree at the center, by Rrivre Works, an event design and rental company. “Bring the outdoors in with living foliage, and accent with florals in the colors of the season,” says Rrivre Davies, owner of Rrivre Works. If your dinner is outdoors, he suggests building a table around your favorite tree.

If you don’t happen to have a tree in your dining room, “consider a potted tree for your next centerpiece,” says Hawrylo. “Big or small, it can provide an unexpected wow factor.” Kim-Park used oversized glass balls with candles for a whimsical yet modern touch — a crystal garland would work just as well against the hand-distressed texture of the table. She added large succulents with accents of fern greenery “for a more organic feel.” 

“We like to take our themes to the max,” says Davies. “Sweet bird dishware and natural linen napkins take the stuffiness out of a formal event without compromising elegance. Layering multiple textures gives the setting a unique, eclectic look.” Pair vintage-inspired “found” dishware from flea markets and estate sales with your existing china to add personality to your table. And never underestimate the power of a napkin, says Hawrylo. “The right color or detail on a napkin can make a table pop. An easy way to add a little flavor to your napkin is by taking two napkins with two different colors and folding it to accomplish a two-tone napkin. This adds character and a little charm.”

Finish off the tablescape with fresh seasonal blooms. For this particular look, Kim-Park used ranunculus, peonies, tulips, fruitilaria and green viburnum in a gold alabaster glass urn, but she says natural florals in miniature vases spread throughout the table work, too.

Swimsuit Guide: Best Suits for Our Bodies

Norwegian-Thai Sports Illustrated model Chrissy Teigen shows you how to properly pose in a swimsuit

As summer is almost upon us (eeks! finishing up Audrey Magazine‘s summer issue as we speak!), it’s time for that annual hunt of great swimsuits to wear to the pool or the beach or down the street. (Ain’t no one stopping you.)

We’ve compiled some details to look out for when finding your perfect swimsuit–especially ones that tend to flatter Asian American bodies and skin tones. Take a look. Continue reading

Lust for Life’s Olivia Lopez: 5 Hot Trends for Summer

Olivia Lopez has got a Lust for Life.

Olivia is a Filipino-Chinese-Spanish American 18-year-old fashion blogger from Southern California. Recognized in the blog world for her free spirited and experimental style, it’s crazy to think that all this creativity comes from someone so young. As of right now, Olivia has 14,073 fans, and 153 looks on Lookbook.nu, not to mention a cult following on her blog site. With a spot as a guest blogger for Olsenboye as well as the numerous modeling gigs she has under her belt (she is the face of the latest Pain de Sucre lookbook shot by Harper’s Bazaar photographer Sylvie Malfray), she is definitely a face to look out for.

Just for Audrey, Olivia has put together a list of five hot trends for this upcoming summer season. Check it out after the jump.

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Beauty Kit | Suncare Special

ISSUE: Summer 2011

DEPT: Beauty Kit

STORY: Anna M. Park

We all know by now that we have to protect ourselves from the sun. But there is so much confusion out there about SPF, the different types of blockers and how much to apply. So we asked cosmetic dermatologist and author Tess Mauricio, M.D., who is of Filipino, Chinese and Spanish descent, to cut to the basics.

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Cargo’s Judy Yonemoto Shares Celeb Makeup Secrets

Want gorgeous skin like Maggie Q’s? Read on.
Cargo’s Judy Yonemoto on how to look as good as your favorite celebs.

ISSUE: Summer 2011

DEPT: Beauty Kit


Makeup artist Judy Yonemoto, a member of cosmetic brand Cargo’s Elite Artist Community, specializes in film and television, and is currently working with the cast of NBC’s hit comedy Outsourced. It’s a perfect fit for the Japanese American because Cargo’s blu-ray High Definition line was specifically designed with photochromatic pigments and micronized minerals to meet the challenges of high definition filming. Here, Judy addresses some of the makeup issues important to Asian women.

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Audrey’s Days of Summer | Summer Hair: Braids

It’s summertime which means heat and humidity. Here are a few easy braids that will keep your hair out of your face. The best way to learn how to braid is to practice, practice, practice! Each braid can be worn in various ways so try a different style out every day!

A secret tip: Rub in a leave-in conditioner or serum before braiding your hair (I like to use unrefined coconut oil). It not only makes your hair easier to braid, but it also sinks in and conditions damaged hair. At the end of the day, rinse it out.

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Beauty Kit | Mind & Body: Feel the Burn

ISSUE:Summer 2012
DEPT:Beauty Kit

Protecting your skin from the sun is no laughing matter, especially when such rampant sun worshipping leads to premature aging, unsightly sunspots and even cancer. But what’s not commonly known is that while skin cancer affects more Caucasian Americans, Asian Americans and other people of color are more likely to diefrom melanoma than their Caucasian counterparts. (Did you know that reggae musician Bob Marley died of skin cancer at the age of 36?)

Strangely enough, melanomas in Asians, including Filipinos, Indonesians and Native Hawaiians, most often occur on non-exposedskin with less pigment — in fact, up to 60-75 percent of tumors show up on the palms, soles, mucous membranes (the mouth!) and nail regions. And among non-Caucasians, melanoma is a higher risk for children than adults: 6.5 percent of pediatric melanomas occur in non-Caucasians.

So what do you do? First, get checked. Look for moles or spots that change over time, get crusty or bleed. The Skin Cancer Foundation is once again launching their Road to Healthy Skin Tour (skincancer.org/tour) this summer. Get a free full body skin cancer screening, the latest info on preventing skin cancer, and samples of the latest Aveeno products, including their genius Hydrosport Sunblock Spray (yes, you can spray on wet skin).

Secondly, always, always, always wear sunscreen, even on cloudy days. Confused by all the different ingredients and SPF labels? One easy way is to look for the Skin Cancer Foundation’s Seal of Recommendation (check out skincancer.org/sealfor details).