Controversial Japanese Illustration Tries To Show What Type of Women Attract Sexual Assault

 

No matter what a woman wears, she is never “asking” for sexual assault. No matter what. So whenever someone tells me I shouldn’t dress a certain way lest I attract unwanted male attention, it’s enough to send me into a angry rage about why they’re wrong.

This is undoubtedly why the Japanese artist who goes by Twitter username @Nakashima273, faced a lot of criticism for his controversial illustration.  In the illustration, he shows 6 females of different height, age, and clothing choice. He then goes on to explain which types of women are more targeted for sexual assault and why. As you can expect, his piece was met with an explosion of angry comments.

However, the artist argued that he was simply showing facts. He points out that the illustration aimed to disprove the common belief that dressing provocatively was “asking for it.”

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Apparently, the picture above shows the easiest targets to the hardest targets from left to right. Surprisingly, those who dressed more modestly attracted more sexual assault. The artist references a blog which states:

Suspects in sex crime cases were asked why they chose that person [to attack]. Fewer than 5 percent said they targeted someone because they were wearing provocative clothing. In rape cases, the most common reason given was ‘they seemed like they wouldn’t report it to the police’ (45%). In indecent assault cases, the most common reason was ‘they seemed meek; I didn’t think they’d be able to stop me’ (48%).

Ayako Uchiyama, who led the research, said ‘It’s often thought that [women] who wear provocative clothing will be targets [for sex crimes], but that’s not the case.

 

Admittedly, we’ve definitely heard the saying that says the more provocatively one dresses, the more likely they attract unwanted male attention. In fact, an Indian politician was under quite a bit of heat for claiming that “rape occurs when women dress and act inappropriately.”

The artist has protested that the point of his illustration was to show that such a belief was incorrect. Does this make his purpose justified? Not quite. As one commenter points out, “Talking about people who attract chikan [sexual assault] easily is looking at it the wrong way. It’s like saying the victim is in the wrong.”

Tell us what you think!

(Source)


Why Asian Americans Should Care About Emma Sulkowicz’s Rape Protest

 

By now, you’ve probably heard of Emma Sulkowicz, the Columbia University senior who was raped by a fellow student on the first day of her sophomore year. She is now carrying around a dorm mattress on campus until her rapist is expelled or leaves school. This act is also a way to protest the manner in which the university handled her rape complaint, or rather, mishandled her rape complaint.

“Rape can happen anywhere,” she explains in a video published by the Columbia Spectator. “For me, I was raped in my own dorm bed. Since then, it has basically become fraught for me, and I feel like I’ve carried the weight of what happened there with me everywhere since then.”

Seven months after the incident, her case finally made it to a university hearing. Sources claim that the three administrators on the panel were confused about anal rape and skeptical about “how it was possible for someone to penetrate her there without lubricant.” Allegedly, Sulkowicz had no other option but to draw a diagram to make them understand. Sulkowicz was left feeling empty and sick after the hearing and worst of all, the man Sulkowicz had accused was found not responsible.

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“Every day, I am afraid to leave my room,” Sulkowicz told Time.“Even seeing people who look remotely like my rapist scares me. Last semester I was working in the dark room in the photography department. Though my rapist wasn’t in my class, he asked permission from his teacher to come and work in the dark room during my class time. I started crying and hyperventilating. As long as he’s on campus with me, he can continue to harass me.”

She allowed her experience to shape her senior thesis called “Carry That Weight.” Carrying her mattress around is her way to protest the fact that her rapist continues to study on campus and acts as a visual representation of the weight she carries with her since the incident.

 


Yes, this matters to the Asian American Community.

For those of you who have glanced at this story and find that it doesn’t apply to you, you may want to think again. Aside from the fact that rape is a very serious issue for everyone, the Asian American community in particular has reason to care about this protest.

Larry Lee, NYAWC’s executive director points out, “Sexual assault in the Asian American community is far more pervasive than might be assumed.  A recent report indicates that 19% of Asian women compared to 11% non-Asian women are sexually abused in America’s colleges.”

Worst of all, many of the rape incidents which involve Asian American women go unreported. Sulkowicz did not immediately file the rape complaint out of fear. As a result, when she turned to the NYPD nine months after the incident, there was no evidence left for the NYPD to make an arrest.

As it turns out, the Asian American community also has an issue with reporting rape incidents. Fear definitely plays a factor, but also, studies show that Asian American women are more likely than Caucasians to believe that preventing rape is a woman’s responsibility. Such myths drastically lower the motivation to report the incident. Additionally, Asian American women are more likely to believe that rape is committed by strangers, which is not always the case.

Asian American Psychology: Current Perspectives points out that “first generation South Asian American women may be more likely to blame the victim, which would decrease the likelihood of South Asian American’s seeking help.”

Clearly, this is an ongoing issue within our community and one that we don’t speak of half as much as we should. Sulkowicz’s  protest shines a very public light on rape and we can only hope that such candidness will allow victims in our own community to recognize that it’s not their fault that they couldn’t prevent the rape from happening. Sulkowicz makes it clear that it’s alright and important to speak out about something as taboo as rape.

Although carrying around a mattress may not be the solution for everyone, we hope that members of our own community (once they’re comfortable enough) will follow her footsteps in creating dialogue about this very serious issue.

 

(Source 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7)

Kiosk Disguised As An ATM Machine Helps Indian Women Report Rape Without Fear

 

There have been countless efforts to try and decrease rape cases in India where terrifying studies show that a woman is raped every 30 minutes. Although all these efforts (such as as anti-rape clothing) try hard to change things, rape continues to be a very serious and prominent issue in India.

Although much focus has been on rape prevention, what about those who have already fallen victim to this unforgivable act? Apparently, they face a whole new layer of difficulties when they try to seek justice.

According to Think Progress, a 16-year-old girl in Calcutta reported a gang-rape to the police. As punishment, the men raped her again and burned her alive. It’s very likely that many women do not report rape out of fear. After all, these death threats are apparently quite common.

 

 

“Women were being denied a fundamental right because of this fear of going to the police. Why should they need someone’s help to do something so basic?” said Joydeep Nayak, a senior member of the police force in India.

Nayak decided to create an alternative to going to the police station. Her solution? She created an electronic kiosk that allows women to discreetly report abuse without fear of backlash. The “Instant Complaint Logging Internet Kiosk,” or “iClik,” resembles an ATM Machine and has been installed in a bank in Bhubaneswar.

Nayak has even addressed the illiteracy issue in India.  For those who are unable to write out a report, the kiosk also records audio reports and scans written complaints.

“My dream is to have a kiosk alongside existing ATMs, in schools, railway stations and bus stations, all over the country — so that women can walk in, complain and leave without any escort or hassles,” Nayak said.

So far, about eight to ten women use the machine every day.

 

 

Watch This Video of Indian Men Apologizing to Women For Rape

 

Just recently, a rape-themed photo shoot directed by Indian photographer Raj Shetye was brought to our attention. Like many of us here at Audrey, social media users all over the world burst into fits of rage and tweeted their disgust of Shetye and his severe lack of judgment.

Shetye claimed that he meant to send a message to women that rape can happen everywhere through his photo shoot. While we appreciate bringing the issue of rape to light, we definitely believe that is not the way to do it.

 

 

A couple of Indian men from the East India Comedy Group, however, got their message right. They issued a heartfelt apology through a video entitled “I’m Not A Woman” to Indian women, acknowledging that women are being wrongfully abused, raped and belittled in their country. We realize this is not going to fix anything overnight, but it is definitely a step in the right direction.

“Why should you ever need apologize to anyone for being yourself? I am sorry,” they say in the video. We couldn’t agree more.

Watch the video below:

 

 

Indian Rape-Themed Fashion Photo Shoot Sparks Major Controversy

 

Let the record show that here at Audrey, we have no problem with creative editorial fashion shoots that showcase photographers and designers who think outside the box. We do however, have a major issue with offensive photo shoots that depict the scenes of a real-life gang rape incident that occurred in New Delhi, India, in 2012, where a 23-year-old woman was brutally raped, tortured and murdered on board a bus home.

This pretty much goes without saying, but it’s just an incredibly insensitive idea to have a rape-themed photo shoot in a country where 93 women are raped every single day. In fact, rape happens so frequently there that Indian women have created anti-rape clothing to protect themselves. Clearly, this is still very much an ongoing problem that has yet to be resolved.

Mumbai-based photographer Raj Shetye, the man responsible for the controversial photos series titled “The Wrong Turn,” claims that the photo shoot was not an act of glamorizing the “Nirbhaya” case  (Hindi word for “fearless,” a nickname given to the 23-year-old victim to protect her identity), but rather as a way to raise awareness for the safety of women in India.

“The message I would like to give is that it doesn’t matter who the girl is,” Shetye defended himself in an interview with Buzzfeed. “It doesn’t depend on which class she belonged in — it can happen to anyone.”

 

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I don’t know if you see what I see, but those photos seem to be an exact, literal representation of glamorizing a truly horrific event.

What do you think? Are you as outraged as we are?

Photos courtesy of Refinery29.

Rise of Anti-Rape Clothing in India Receives Criticism

 

India has seen an influx of “anti-rape clothing” over recent years. Although this has created quite some controversy, people across the country are desperately trying to create anything that could hinder unwanted advances.

“The harassment of the girl in Delhi was the turning point for all to realize that we need to take a step against this menace,” 21-year-old Manisha Mohan, who co-created an anti-rape bra, told Vetunotech, referring to the infamous New Delhi gang rape in 2012, where a 23-year-old student was brutally raped, tortured and killed on a public bus. Since then, there have been a number of efforts to create strict measures against rape. New anti-rape laws have been passed by the Indian government, including the death penalty for repeat offenders.

 

 

Despite these efforts, rape continues to be a horrifying reality to many Indian women. Earlier this year, a 20-year-old woman was gang raped by 13 men in her rural village as punishment for having a relationship with a man from a different community. In another incident, 10 men were arrested for gang raping a 21-year-old woman. Even more shocking, a 7-year-old girl was raped and hanged.

But relying on politicians and government officials have often been fruitless. One police official compared rape to gambling and said if you can’t prevent it, you enjoy it. Later, a female politician claimed rape occurs when women act and dress inappropriately. Needless to say, many citizens felt like they needed to take measures into their own hands.

This is why three Indian engineering students created the anti-rape bra called SHE (Society Harnessing Equipment). According to NBC News, the bra “delivers a strong electric shock to potential rapists and attackers, and also has the ability to send an alert text message to the wearer’s friends and family.” There are also college students from the city of Varanasi who have created a line of anti-rape jeans. According to Daily Mail, the jeans “contain an electronic tracker that will send a distress signal to the nearest police station when pressed.” And this doesn’t even cover the anti-rape wrist watches and jackets.

 

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Anti-rape watch. Photo courtesy of http://ibnlive.in.com/

 

Anti-rape jeans.

Anti-rape jeans.

 

Obviously, anti-rape clothing was created with nothing but good intentions, however, many are questioning whether or not it would actually work.

“In India, most of the rapes happen within the family,” said Indian journalist Sonia Faleiro. “It happens behind the closed door. These people aren’t going to stop what they are doing because of a piece of clothing.” Furthermore, Faleiro pointed out that girls still live in fear and anti-rape clothing is just a bandaid to the big issue.

Faleiro certainly brings up good points. This issue won’t be solved with bandaid solutions alone, and women shouldn’t have to live in fear or wear outrageous clothing. Women and victims are not responsible for rape and they should not be the only ones taking measures to prevent it.

However, I still believe it is a step in creating change and most importantly, it has people talking about an issue that needs to be discussed. On certain occasions, these devices let women feel safe and give men the message that a lack of consent is not OK.

Tell us what you think.

 

Artist David Choe Says He Fabricated Podcast Story About ‘Rapey Behavior’

Story by James S. Kim.

Korean American artist David Choe is known to be provocative in his work, but he may have gone too far when he told a story on his podcast about a questionable sexual encounter with a massage therapist that some are flagging as rape. After the initially obscure DVDASA podcast garnered greater attention and caused some to accuse him of rape, the artist issued a statement recently saying that he’s not a rapist and that he fabricated the encounter.

“We create stories and tell tales. It’s not a news show. It’s not a representation of my reality,” Choe said in his statement, which was posted on the podcast’s blog. “I’m sorry if anyone believed that the stories were fact. They were not!”

The episode of DVDASA, which Choe co-hosts with adult film actress Asa Akira, aired on March 10, but it was until weeks later on April 17 when a XoJane, an online women’s lifestyle magazine, highlighted Choe’s encounter with a female masseuse at a massage parlor in Los Angeles. Since then, others including Gawker and the Daily Mail picked up the story.

In the podcast, Choe said that, halfway through the massage, he got an erection, and after thinking on how to best act on it, decided to start masturbating in front of the masseuse, whom he calls “Rose.”

Choe said in the podcast that he took the woman’s hand and placed it on his penis, then asked her to “kiss it a little.” When Rose refused, he said he took the back of her head and forced her into oral sex. She refused to have intercourse with him, and apparently asked him to lie back down to finish the massage, he said.

The story was Choe’s account of an “Erection Quest,” which co-host Akira describes as “trying things you’ve never tried before to obtain a super hard erection.” When Choe finished his account, though, Akira said, “You raped … allegedly.” In the podcast, Choe also mentioned that the masseuse later asked him if he’d like to go out with her, and that apparently indicated to him that she did like him. After the podcast members talked about “rapey” behavior vs. “rape,” Choe said, “I just want to make it clear that I admit that that’s rapey behavior. But I am not a rapist.”

In the XoJane article, the author, Melissa Stetten, wrote, “I don’t know if ‘Rose’ really had a crush on David or not. All I know is the way David told the story makes it seem like he forced an unwilling woman to give him oral sex.”

After XoJane published its article, Choe responded the next day on DVDASA’s website, saying his story was entirely fictional.

“I never thought I’d wake up one late afternoon and hear myself called a rapist. It sucks. Especially because I am not one. I am not a rapist. I hate rapists, I think rapists should be raped and murdered,” he wrote. “I am an artist and a storyteller and I view my show DVDASA as a complete extension of my art. If I am guilty of anything, it’s bad storytelling in the style of douche. Just like many of my paintings are often misinterpreted, the same goes with my show.”

According to Buzzfeed, Vice is “looking into” the incident involving Choe, who is currently involved in the company’s web series Thumbs Up! and has also served as a correspondent for Vice’s HBO show. When asked by Buzzfeed whether Vice would continue to work with the artist, Vice spokeswoman Cappi Williamson said, “Vice staffers are aware of it [David Choe’s story] and reviewing the situation internally.”

Here’s the podcast in question from DVDASA Episode 106, “Erection Quest.” The story beings around the 1:13:00 mark.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZKgOtFUyDBs

 

This story was originally published on iamkoream.com

Controversy in India: Politician Believes Women Who Have Premarital Sex Should Be Hanged

The infamous New Delhi Gang Rape of 2012 horrified the world. Since then, India has put forth a number efforts to create strict measures against rape. Unfortunately, incidents of rape continue despite these efforts.

Earlier this year, a 20-year-old woman was gang raped by 13 men in her rural village in eastern India as punishment for having a relationship with a man from a different community. Last year, ten men were arrested for gang raping a 21-year-old woman. Even more shocking, a 7-year-old girl was raped inside a state-run school in the Indian capital.

Many netizens are now pointing a finger to politicians who appear to be making matters worse.

Abu Azmi, of India’s Socialist Party, recently claimed that women who engage in premarital sex should be sentenced to death. If this isn’t jarring enough, he claimed that women should receive this sentence even if they were raped.

“If rape happens with or without consent, it should be punished as prescribed in Islam,” Azmi said. “The solution is this: Any woman, whether married or unmarried, who goes along with a man, with or without her consent, should be hanged. Both should be hanged. It shouldn’t be allowed even if a woman goes by consent.”

As expected, thousand of people reacted in anger. Over 11,000 Twitter comments were made against Azmi’s statement. In fact, even Azmi’s daughter-in-law spoke out. Bollywood actress Ayesha Takia tweeted, “if wot im reading about my father in laws statements r true then me and Farhan are deeply embarrassed n ashamed…(sic).”

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Since making the statement, Azmi has tried to clarify his words. “I never said that the girl who is raped should be punished. I said rapist should be punished and girl is a victim. I said that all of us should show solidarity with the girl,” Mr Azmi said in Mumbai. “I will never make such statement, only a mad person will say such things,” he added.

Unfortunately, the public is not buying it. Azmi joins a list of politicians who have received heat for their inappropriate comments concerning rape.

Late last year, Central Bureau of Investigation chief Ranjit Sinha faced public outrage because of his inappropriate comment. Sinha compared gambling and rape by stating,”If you can’t enforce it, it is like you can’t prevent rape, enjoy it.”

Months later, female politician Asha Mirje claimed that rape occurs when women act and dress inappropriately. She stated that women needed to be more mindful of whether or not they were “inviting” sexual assault.

All these politicians have tried to retract their statement after public outrage. As you can expect, their apologies have not been accepted.

(Source 1, 2)

 

Female Politician Claims Rape Occurs When Women Act & Dress Inappropriately, Outrage Ensues

It has been over a year since the infamous New Delhi gang-rape where a 23-year-old student was brutally raped, tortured and killed on a public bus in 2012.

Traumatized by the events of that night, India has spent the year putting forth efforts to create strict measures against rape. Despite this, rape continues to be a horrifying reality to many Indian women. Just last week, a 20-year-old woman was gang raped by 13 men in her rural village in eastern India. The most horrifying part? This was on the orders of the village court as punishment for having a relationship with a man from a different community. On Christmas eve, ten men were arrested for gang raping a 21-year-old woman. Even more shocking, early last year, a 7-year-old girl was raped inside a state-run school in the Indian capital.

These are only a few of the many rape cases which occur in India and have caused a number of protests.

Under all the tragedy that India has faced with rape-related cases, we certainly didn’t expect to hear a public figure put the blame on rape victims. Unfortunately, we were wrong.

Asha Mirje, a Nationalist Congress Party (NCP) leader and a member of the Maharashtra Women’s Commission is under fire for her recent remarks. While discussing the New Delhi gang rape, Mirje commented, “Did [the victim] really have go to watch a movie at 11 in the night with her friend?”

She then addressed another case where a photojournalist was gang raped in Mumbai. “Why did the victim go to such an isolated spot at 6pm?” Mirje asked. “Rapes take place also because of a woman’s clothes, her behaviour and her presence at inappropriate places.”

“Due to these reasons, a woman has to think whether, mistakenly, she is not inviting or inviting (sexual assault),” she added.

As expected, Mirje’s shocking comments received instant outrage.

“Every time such a statement is made by a public figure it justifies rape,”says Kavita Krishnan, secretary of the All India Progressive Women’s Association. “It’s unconscionable that people in public posts make such remarks.”

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Many others are insisting that she be removed from her position.

“She has no moral right to continue on the post as she is biased against women,” says Rupa Kulkarni, activist and the leader of domestic workers in the state.

Another activist Seema Sakhare added, “How can a member of women’s commission make such a comment whose duty is to protect women in the state?”

Since her remarks, Mirje has defended herself.

“I just said that although men are responsible for rapes and molestation, women too need to take more precautions in order to protect themselves,” she defended. “If anyone was hurt by my statement, I am really sorry. I am not diplomatic. There was no bad intention and the motive behind my statement was pure concern for women’s safety.”

(Source 1, 2 )

A Bra That Will Only Come Undone For Your “True Love”

We want to begin by saying we’re just as confused as you are.

But to the Japanese lingerie company Ravijour, a “True Love Tester Bra” makes perfect sense. Makers are claiming that the bra is able to analyze how a woman truly feels and will only pop open when the user finds her true love.

The lingerie company is marketing the bra as a safety device. Apparently, the bra will ward off unwanted sexual advances and will make sure that all people, except your true love, will not have access to your breasts.

How does this peculiar, high-tech undergarment work? According to the video promo seen below, the bra contains a sensor which syncs with an app on the user’s phone. The sensor will monitor and track the user’s heartbeat and once the heart rate reaches a specific point (the heart rate of true love, of course) the bra will come undone on its own.

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Of course, we’ve come across a number of problems with this device:

1. So what if you don’t find your true love? Do you have to keep the bra on forever? We’re certain that there are other ways to make the bra pop open on its own, but the video promo seems to constantly emphasize that the bra will only come undone in the presence of true love.

2. How accurate can that heart rate chart really be? What if I’m going out for a light run? Should I expect my bra to pop open because my heart rate has picked up? A person’s heart rate can rise and fall for a number of reasons. We highly doubt that this device is so intelligent that it can pinpoint the exact moment a woman finds her true love.

3. No, this is not an anti-rape product. As Huffington Post points out, “This high-tech bra will never “save” a woman from sexual harassment. Just because one’s brassiere isn’t being ripped off by an aggressive gentleman, doesn’t mean that the wearer isn’t experiencing a barrage of other forms of unwanted sexual attention before an evening gets to that point.” And getting into technicalities, what if one’s heart rate increases out of fear?

4. We’re pretty sure this thing can’t “know” how women feel. The creators (two men) can’t actually believe that true love can be measured based on a “one-size-fits-all” heart rate chart, right? I’d like to believe we’re much more complicated beings than that.

5. What if a girl just wants to have sex? In this day and age, there are plenty of women who are sexual beings. Believe it or not, women can actually want to have sex even if their partner isn’t their one true love. Shocking!

A woman should have the freedom to make these decisions for herself.