Did HIMYM Go Too Far OR Have Asians Become Hypersensitive?

By now, you’ve probably heard about the controversial episode of How I Met Your Mother. If not, lets get you caught up.

The newest episode “Slapsgiving 3: Slappointment in Slapmarra,”  continued an on-going joke throughout the show where Marshall Eriksen (Jason Segel) humorously slaps Barney Stinson (Neil Patrick Harris).

Segel’s character explains that he went through training in Shanghai, China to perfect his slapping skills. The show then reveals his three “masters” who turn out to be the other main characters sporting Asian attire, hair accessories, and even a  Fu Manchu mustache.

As you can expect, most of the Asian American community felt that all the “yellowface” used was a personal slap to our face. The episode angered so many viewers that  the hashtag  #HowIMetYourRacism blew up on twitter.

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In response to the massive backlash,  How I Met Your Mother co-creator Carter Bays tweeted his apology.

Hey guys, sorry this took so long. @himymcraig and I want to say a few words about #HowIMetYourRacism. With Monday’s episode, we set out to make a silly and unabashedly immature homage to Kung Fu movies, a genre we’ve always loved. But along the way we offended people. We’re deeply sorry, and we’re grateful to everyone who spoke up to make us aware of it. We try to make a show that’s universal, that anyone can watch and enjoy. We fell short of that this week, and feel terrible about it. To everyone we offended, I hope we can regain your friendship, and end this series on a note of goodwill. Thanks. @CarterBays@HimymCraig

— Carter Bays (@CarterBays) January 15, 2014

This is the point where opinions begin to divide. Some of the Asian community pointed out that while the apology is appreciated, something so obviously offensive never should have been aired. They have pointed out that we have had to hear this apology too many times and you would think that people would know to not use a culture as a costume. Angry Asian Man spilled out his sentiments by writing:

I appreciate apologies that acknowledge wrongdoing and avoid placing blame on the offended. People make mistakes. But this apology sounds a lot like the really really nice guy who hates it when people are mad at him. We get it, you feel terrible that we were offended. You feel terrible that you messed up. So how about actually addressing what you did to mess up? Aw, hell. I’m nitpicking at lackluster apologies.

Really, you just wish they’d had the sense to avoid this bullshit altogether. Obviously, as usual, that was asking too much. Now we all have that image of fu manchu’d Ted Moseby seared into our souls.

But then others in the Asian American community are disagreeing with the backlash all together. They claim that the apology is sincere, they acknowledged their mistake, and as a community, we are slowly opening the eyes of others. They point out that it’s a process and we need to allow people to see, acknowledge, and change their mistakes. This opinion can be seen with CNN host Don Lemon interviewing the popular Vietnamese comedian Dat Phan on his thoughts towards the controversy. Watch it below.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KGU4BGBzpqw&feature=youtu.be

 

So now we turn towards the real question. Did How I Met Your Mother go too far? Are we tired of hearing all the excuses given to us when all we’re asking for is respect for our culture? OR is Dat Phan correct in saying that we have become hypersensitive and not everything concerning Asians should cause offense?

Watch the How I Met Your Mother clip below and tell us what you think. 

 

Golden Globes 2014: Where are all the Asian People?

Story by Taylor Weik. 

As 5 p.m. drew closer and closer this past Sunday, my Tumblr dashboard began filling up with red. High-resolution photos of glamorous celebrities posing in their designer gowns and tuxedos on the red carpet were already making their way to the Internet, and the Golden Globes hadn’t even started.

 

I eagerly browsed the #gg14 tag on Tumblr while simultaneously searching online for a link to stream the red carpet event and the awards show itself. As someone who has spent more money on movie tickets than she’d care to admit and had at one point considered declaring film and media studies as a major, awards season is for me what the Superbowl is for my tailgate party-attending football fanatic friends. For a few hours on those special Sunday nights –– though I may be watching from a dimly lit computer screen and in pajama pants –– I couldn’t be happier.

 

I indulged in red carpet hour as always and watched as the ever-so-chic Giuliana Rancic and Ryan Seacrest made their interview rounds. Bradley Cooper. Jennifer Lawrence. Julia Roberts. Bryan Cranston. They came by limo, paused for questions and were swept away for photos. So many familiar faces from my favorite TV shows and movies flashed on the screen, but there were plenty more faces I didn’t see.

 

I could count the number of Asian people I saw on one hand. Little Aubrey Anderson-Emmons from Modern Family pranced around and comedian-actor Aziz Ansari attended (he also was one of three actors who announced the Golden Globe nominees back in December), but otherwise the turnout was discouraging. Phil Yu, founder of the popular Angry Asian Man blog, tweeted “Playing “Asian Spotting” while watching the Golden Globes is like the most boring game ever.”

The lack of Asian American actors, directors and crew members in the entertainment industry is nothing new to us. Browse the list of big movies set to release in 2014 and you won’t see any Asian American actors credited until almost half of the year is over, in May, when Ken Watanabe’s name appears in the new Godzilla reboot.

 

But at least last year at the Golden Globes, we had some representation in the form of successful actors like Lucy Liu, who wowed viewers in her long side braid and iconic floral Carolina Herrera gown on the red carpet. At least last year, Life of Pi was nominated for multiple awards, including Ang Lee for Best Director of a Motion Picture.

 

No one of Asian descent was nominated in the Golden Globes this year –– again, not a big surprise –– but the fact that I didn’t see many Asian people in the red carpet coverage says a lot about who is represented in Hollywood and who is continued to be left out of it.

 

Granted, some Asian Americans were represented in the form of dazzling dresses and six-inch heels. Kerry Washington flaunted her baby bump in a creamy Balenciaga number designed by Alexander Wang, and Jimmy Choo was a popular choice for pumps (Sandra Bullock) and clutches (Taylor Swift). But future awards shows better start recognizing the Rinko Kikuchis and Ken Watanabes out there –– I’m not sure how much longer I can stand having Hollywood equate “Asian American” with only designer bags and shoes.

 

(photo source)

Can You Spot The Difference? Unnecessary Edits For Mindy Kaling’s ELLE Magazine Cover

February 2014 is Elle’s annual Women in TV issue. They’ve decided to feature four of television’s top celebrities: Zooey Deschanel, Amy Poehler, Allison Williams and Audrey Magazine Winter 2011-12  covergirl, Mindy Kaling. The four actresses all received their very own cover. This is reason to rejoice, right? An Asian American actress is finally being ranked equally in mainstream media!

But wait. Is she?

It doesn’t take much effort to spot the blatant difference between Kaling’s cover compared to the others. Many upset readers have pointed out the very obvious difference that Kaling’s cover is the only one black and white. Sure, the actress still looks stunning, but why are the other women not also in black and white? Why did they feel the need to take away the color of the one woman who was not Caucasian?

Other readers have pointed out that while the other three actresses received full-body covers, Kaling’s cover is a cropped close up.

Is it a coincidence? Is it just chance that Kaling (who happens to not fit the stereotypical body size of American actresses) is the only one who doesn’t receive a full body cover? Is it mere coincidence that the one person of color gets the black and white photo? Did they simply fail to notice that the other three photos are consistent and similar while Kaling’s is not?

Tell us what you think.

 

CONTROVERSY ALERT: Tiger Mom Claims “Some Races Are Superior”

Amy Chua is no stranger to controversy. In 2011, she gained the nickname “Tiger Mom” through her book Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother which advocated for a strict “Chinese” parenting style as well her belief that Chinese mothers are superior.

Now, she’s making headlines once again by taking that belief one step further.

Chua, a Chinese American law professor at Yale, joins forces with husband Jed Rubenfeld to write The Triple Package. The point of this book? To prove that certain groups of people are superior because they have innate qualities that make them more likely to succeed in life.

The Triple Package lists these groups as most likely to succeed in America: Jewish, Indian, Chinese, Iranian, Lebanese-Americans, Nigerians, Cuban exiles and Mormons. As the title indicates, the duo believe that these cultural groups have three traits in common which make them inherently more superior than others: a superiority complex, insecurity and impulse control.

“Mormons have recently risen to astonishing business success,” the authors write. “Cubans in Miami climbed from poverty to prosperity in a generation. Nigerians earn doctorates at stunningly high rates. Indian and Chinese Americans have much higher incomes than other Americans; Jews may have the highest of all.”

According to NYDailyNews, the book also explains why some cultural groups, including African Americans, “might not have what it takes to reach the top.”

The authors seem to recognize that they are making rather controversial claims, but are standing by their work. The books publisher, Penguin Press, released a statement yesterday in support of The Triple Package.

“We are proud to be publishing ‘The Triple Package’ in February and we look forward to a thoughtful discussion about the book and success in America,” the statement read.

Although the book will not hit shelves until February, it has already gathered a handful of criticism (for obvious reasons) from critics and public alike.

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(Source 1, 2, 3)

Audrey’s Top Ten Stories of 2013

2013 was quite the year for Audrey Magazine. Not only did it mark our ten year anniversary, it was also the launch of our revamped website. While we’re more than excited to kick off this new year, let’s take a moment to look back on all the stories of style, beauty and inspiring Asian Americans of the previous year.

Ranked by which stories were the most popular of the year, we bring you Audrey’s Top Ten Stories of 2013!


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1) Breaking The Asian Myth | Asian Hair
“If there’s one Asian stereotype we’re all very familiar with, its Asian hair. No one knows when this actually happened, but at one point people began thinking that all Asian women had the same kind of hair…”


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2) Not For Weak Stomachs: Removal of a 25-Year-Old Blackhead 
“In September we showed you the results of sleeping with makeup on for an entire month and called it a horror story. Now we take that back. We take it all back. Apparently, that wasn’t a skincare horror story at all. This is…”


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3) Korean Twin Sisters Unrecognizable After Plastic Surgery 
“It’s no secret. In Asia, plastic surgery is becoming more and more common. In fact, double eyelid surgery is so typical that many girls have been known to receive the procedure as a graduation gift. Aside from these minor procedures, just how far has surgery entered Asian culture? According to some, surgery has become a very serious ordeal…”


2013 d4) World’s 15 Most Followed Asian Female Celebrities on Twitter 
“1. Indonesian entertainer Agnes Monica (@agnezmo) — 8,326,171 followers
2. Japanese-Swiss-Polish Brazilian TV personality Sabrina Sato Rahal (@sabrinasatoreal) 3. Indonesian singer Sherina Munaf (@sherinamunaf)…”


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5) Korean American K-Pop Star Embroiled in Nude Photos Scandal
“Korean American singer Ailee has been receiving enormous attention from the Korean media after nude photos of the K-pop star surfaced on the Internet. Allkpop, a popular New York-based K-pop website, published censored versions of the photos last night, igniting a firestorm of controversy…”


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6) The Ultimate Guide to EXO
“EXO is separated into two subgroups, EXO K and EXO M, which promotes in Korea and China respectively. But together? This boy band totals to 12 members. Overwhelming? Just a bit. As much as we wanted to get to know the line-up for KCON, was learning all 12 members worth it? YES. The answer to that question is a very enthusiastic yes…”


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7) False Rumor: Philippines Disqualified From Pageants For The Next Two Years 
“In the midst of all this good news for the Philippines, a strange rumor has begun to spread. According to The Adobo Chronicles, the  Association of Beauty Pageant Franchise Holders (ABPFH) has disqualified the Philippines from international beauty pageants for the next two years claiming that Filipina candidates had an “enormous advantage” this year…”


2013 h
8) Asians in Fashion | EXO-K for Ivy Club Autumn 2013
“With the rise of EXO’s popularity, we can confidently say that  Ivy Club made quite a good decision to have the boys model and endorse their Autumn 2013 look…”


2013 i
9) Extremely Racist Responses to Olympus Has Fallen
“Its no secret that we still face racism today. Every time I start to believe that I live in my ideal/equal world, acts like this bring me back to the reality that we still have a long way to go…”


2013 j
10) Where I Went and What I Bought: Seoul
“I took a dream vacation last month. Not to some tropical hideaway surrounded by crystal clear waters. Not to a romantic European capital overflowing with crumbling palaces and fine wine. No, I went on a shopping vacation. To Korea…”

 

Asian Guys Respond To Cyberbullying Over Lorde’s Asian Boyfriend

Last week, much to our dislike, New Zealand singer/songwriter Lorde faced what can only be described as racist cyberbullying.

Rumors began to spread that the 17-year-old singer called Justin Beiber and the members of One Direction “ugly.” As a result, Beiber fans and One Direction fans chose to retaliate. Their main focus? Lorde’s 24-year-old rumored boyfriend, James Lowe.

The worst part about all this is that the cyberbullies chose to use some of the worst stereotypes about Asian males. Although he did nothing to deserve the insults, Lowe was called ugly, scrawny, nerdy, Psy gone wrong, and a number of other derogatory terms.

While many Asians expressed anger about the racist remarks, comedian Andrew Fung tried to focus on some of the positives of this situation.

“I was like, ‘Oh, he’s a skinny Asian guy! It’s not like he’s a buff K-Pop guy,'” said Fung. “That’s very cool.”

Fun pointed out that the situation would be much less controversial had Lorde been dating a more “conventionally attractive Asian-American male,” but is glad that a “nerdy Asian guy is in the spotlight.”

Fung and his brother David expressed their full views on the situation through the following video. Though it was uploaded less than a week ago, the video has already gathered over 66,000 views on YouTube.

Racist Cyberbullying Over Lorde’s “Scrawny Asian” Boyfriend

Much to our dislike, racist cyberbullying appears to be alive and well. Today’s victim is none other than New Zealand singer/songwriter Lorde and her rumored boyfriend, James Lowe.

Why the attack on the Grammy nominated, “Royals” singer? Apparently, a rumor has spread that the 17-year-old singer called Justin Beiber and the members of One Direction “ugly.” These statements were never actually confirmed, but that didn’t stop the teens who were angered by these rumors. Beiber and One Direction fans were quick to retaliate and focus their attacks on Lorde’s personal life.

Last week, bikini photos of Lorde embracing 24-year-old Lowe exploded on tabloids and the angry teens were quick to post their opinion of the couple on twitter.

Many of the tweets focused on Lowe’s race and pulled in a number of negative stereotypes towards Asian men. The tweets that didn’t focus on Lowe’s Asian descent were equally rude and shallow.

Lorde has not yet responded to her cyberbullies.

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(Source 1, 2)

Dutch Reality TV Judge Cracks Racist Jokes at Chinese Singer

Story by Young Rae Kim. 

This week’s video may cause you to be outraged and ruin your perfectly normal day. So consider yourself warned!

A celebrity judge on Holland’s Got Talent cracks racist jokes at a Chinese contestant while thinking that he has to be the funniest person alive. The jokes, which occur 0:48, 2:38 and 2:58, used references to Chinese food and also pointed out that the contestant’s appearance did not “fit” his voice.

“You look like a scientist!” said judge Gordon Heuckeroth, a 45-year-old Dutch singer and TV personality. When contestant Xiao Wang said he would be performing Verdi, Heuckeroth asked, “Which number are you singing? Number 39 with rice?”

Netizens were fuming after watching the video and some drew comparisons of the Dutch judge and Simon Cowell. However, most noted Heuckeroth was on another level of being a racist jerk.

“Simon is extremely sarcastic and blunt, to the point of being rude. But he’s not a f—ing blatant racist,” said Reddit user mankstar.

Other users pointed out how the judges stereotyped the contestant based on his appearance.

“Don’t you know only beautiful people can sing?” a commenter asked sarcastically.

A fellow judge, on the far left, showed his disapproval of the racist comments of his peer and shook his head in unbelief after the jokes were made. At the end of the clip, you can briefly catch him confronting his co-worker before the video is cut off.

The judge on the left says, “You’re really not supposed to say things like that to people…it’s awful”. However, the racist judge seemed oblivious to his wrongdoing.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2AjJbBMnxts

This story was originally published in iamkoream.com.

Racist Reactions to Girls’ Generation’s Video of The Year Award

Fans of the beloved Kpop group Girls’ Generation were thrilled when their music video  “I Got A Boy” won YouTube’s Video of The Year Award at the first YouTube Music Awards on Sunday night.

Tiffany was there on behalf of the girls to accept the award and thank SM Entertainment, her fellow members, and fans of Girls’ Generation.

This was clearly a huge step for Asian entertainers to win such a mainstream award. The girls were up against icons such as Lady Gaga, Justin Bieber, One Direction and Selena Gomez.

Unfortunately, this very joyous moment was quickly tainted by viewers who opposed the award recipient choice. Many of these individuals simply did not know who Girls’ Generation was. For some reason, they felt that because they were unfamiliar with the girl group, they were justified in attacking GG’s race, music and members.

These comments quickly turned into racist ones and left us sighing with disappointment.

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Thankfully, a number of fans argued against these racist comments. Our most favorite fan in defense of Girls’ Generation? YouTube.

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(SOURCE)

ABC Apologizes For “Kill Everyone In China” Comment

What started off as a light-hearted comedy skit quickly turned into an awkward and offensive ordeal.

The Jimmy Kimmel Show recently had an unscripted skit called “Kid’s Table” where children discussed some of the major political issues such as the government shut down and America’s debt crisis.

When Kimmel asked the children what America should do about the $1.3 trillion that the US owes China, one boy replied: “Kill everyone in China.”

The boy’s unscripted comment sparked heated reactions from many individuals in both China and the US.

Everyone understood that the comment was from a child who may or may not have realized what he said, but many questioned where this response could have come from.

Rocket News 24 described the ordeal by saying “Awkward Jimmy Kimmel segment suggests some kids start being racist jerks at around age six.”

Reactions were so heated that many petitions were made against Kimmel’s decision to air the comment. A White House petition claimed, “The kids might not know better. However, Jimmy Kimmel and ABC’s management are adults. They had a choice not to air this racist program. It is totally unacceptable and should have been cut. Please cut the show immediately and issue a formal apology.”

A separate petition on Change.org claims “The comment ‘Killing all the Chinese’ is NOT a joke, no matter who says it.  It is totally unacceptable. Jimmy Kimmel and the ABC network should know this “Killing all the Chinese” comment is offensive and racist.”

As a result, ABC issued an apology letter to 80-20, a pan-Asian-American political organization. The apology reads, “We would never purposefully broadcast anything to upset the Chinese community, Asian community, anyone of Chinese descent or any community at large…our objective is to entertain.”

The network says the skit will be edited out of theJimmy Kimmel Live episode for future airings. You can watch the small remark below:

 

(Source 1, 2, 3, 4, 5)