The Beauty Photoshop Experiment On A Woman Of Color

 

You may remember 24-year-old journalist Esther Honig who did the original beauty photoshop experiment which revealed the various ideals of beauty around the world. Honig sent her picture to people in over 25 countries and asked them to use photoshop to “make her beautiful.”

The goal of the experiment was to get people to reconsider the beauty standards and expectations that they hold themselves to. What is considered beautiful in one country doesn’t apply to all.  Ultimately, she wanted to prove that beauty ideals are subjective and we shouldn’t be too hard on ourselves if we don’t fit just one standard of beauty. Proving her point, all her pictures came back looking drastically different.

But journalist Priscilla Yuki Willson was left with a lot of questions following Honig’s experiment. Most importantly, Wilson (who is half black, half Japanese) wondered how these standards would be implemented on a bi-racial woman of color. After all, the multi-race community is the fastest growing community in the United States. Following Honig’s footsteps, she decided to conduct the experiment herself.

“It’s a dialogue that specifically addresses race and ethic features in an industry where beauty standards are apparently euro centric,” she said.

The results? She discovered that countries who were more accustomed to diverse ethnicities, such as the United States, had very little to change from her original photo. Other countries, such as Vietnam, left her nearly unrecognizable.

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Original Photo.

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Photoshopped in the United States.

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Photoshopped in Vietnam.

 

To see more of the photoshop results, click here. 

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Photoshop Experiment Shows Every Country Has A Different Standard of Beauty

If you pick up a dictionary and look up “most ridiculous beauty test in existence,” you’ll find yourself looking at Asia’s Finger Trap Beauty test. Fine, it may not be in the dictionary, but that’s certainly how we feel about a “test” that judges beauty based on whether you have a tall nose, a small jaw and really long fingers.

Twenty-four-year-old journalist Esther Honig seems to be on the same page as us about these ridiculous and unattainable standards of beauty. Honig recently did a experiment about ideal beauty around the world and the results reinforce what we’ve believed in all these years: There is no one standard of beauty.

Think about it. If the Asian Finger Trap test determines beauty, then what about those, like myself, who don’t pass this test? Does this mean we should go cry ourselves to sleep because no one will ever find us attractive?

Nope, I don’t think so.

Honig recognized that one person’s perception of beauty is completely different from the next. How can we think of a single test as the all-knowing judge of beauty when the definition of beauty is constantly changing? In Asia there’s the finger trap test, but in America there’s the “thigh gap” obsession. Clearly, those are two very different scales and yet they both “determine” beauty. Confused? You should be.

To prove her point, Honig contacted 40 Photoshop-savvy individuals from more than 25 different countries. Their task was simple: edit her photo and make her beautiful.

The results blew her away. All the Photoshopped images were drastically different from one another.

“I hope this forces viewers to reconsider their concept of beauty and the expectations they hold themselves to,” Honig says. “When we compare unobtainable standards on a global scale, achieving the ideal remains all that more elusive. It almost neutralizes the belief in a universal beauty.”

So the next time you feel ugly because your strong eyebrows simply can’t conform to the trendy short and straight “K-pop eyebrows,” remember in India, you’d be gorgeous.

You’re welcome.

Before & After: Indonesia

Before & After: Indonesia

Before & After: India

Before & After: India

 

Before & After: Philippines

Before & After: Philippines

Before & After: Vietnam

Before & After: Vietnam

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Before & After: Morocco

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Before & After: Argentina

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Before & After: United States of America

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Before & After: Chile

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Before & After: Kenya

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Before & After: Serbia

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Before & After: Pakistan

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Before & After: United Kingdom

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Before & After: Bangladesh

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Before & After: Bulgaria

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Before & After: Sri Lanka

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Before & After: Israel

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Before & After: Greece

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Before & After: Bangladesh

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Before & After: Italy

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Before & After: Serbia

(Source 1, 2)

Asian Woman Turns To Photoshop To Change Appearance

Yesterday, we pointed out that the pressure to be thin is only one of the many issues that Asian women face. The need to be beautiful seems to increase daily and Asian women are taking extreme measures to get there.

One such measure is surgery. Last month, the public couldn’t stop talking about television personality Julie Chen and her decision to go under the knife to progress her career. Of course, this is nothing compared to the startling amount of surgeries happening in Asia.

Korean photographer Ji Yeo claims, “Plastic surgery has become an integral part of Korea’s current culture, often regarded as an integral step in the self improvement process. It is a culture where men are judged on their financial balance sheet and women on their beauty. The male-dominated media endlessly reinforces its model of the idea woman. As a result of these cultural forces Korea has become a beauty-oriented society where people are judged more for their appearance than their character.”

In fact, a Korean woman recently went through a number of surgical procedures to look like Victoria’s Secret model, Miranda Kerr. Of course, all this comes with a price. Aside from the rather large sum of money women are coughing up to be more beautiful, surgery runs the risk of long-term complications. Take Xiao Lian for example. The already pretty woman decided to get surgery on her face and is now struggling with the deterioration of her face years later.

So what’s a girl to do when she doesn’t want the risks of surgery, but can’t deal with the overwhelming pressure to be beautiful? Apparently, some Asian women are turning to photoshop.

The rise of social media and online dating has its share of ups and downs. A notable downside to online dating is the misleading profile pictures. Who hasn’t heard of proper “myspace angles” when taking pictures or the infamous guy who posts up a pictures of himself ten years younger. Social media users have all been warned time and time again– what you see is not necessarily what you get.

A Chinese news and gossip site recently posted up pictures of a woman before and after photoshop. The images quickly went viral and left many Chinese readers in disbelief. World News Views reports, “Reactions ranged from impressed to shocked to downright disturbed that such a ‘plain’ person could become a radiant beauty when equipped with the right tools. Some people needed to be convinced that it was even the same girl.”

To many of us, the altering of pictures is nothing new. In fact, this has become so common that there are even mobile apps which “beautify” pictures as well. For example, the app Beauty Plus smoothens pores, slims down your face, and brightens your eyes with just one tap.

The pressure to be beautiful will surely increase with the rise in photoshop and beauty apps. So tell us what you think– Is it too much? Did this girl even need photoshop to begin with?

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