China Turns the Tables: Attractive Men Used to Market Women’s Beauty Products

 

We understand why women star in makeup commercials. After all, women are (generally) the target audience for makeup. But when women are used for cologne commercials, sports commercials or any other male-targeted product commercials, we can’t help but cringe a little. Don’t get us wrong — we have no problem with women breaking gender roles and being into these products as well, but you can’t sit there and tell us that a hot girl in a bikini swooning over a guy’s freshly-shaven face makes women wanna go buy some shaving cream.

Nevertheless, attractive women are constantly used to sell male-targeted products. This led me to wonder what it would be like if things were the other way around. No, I’m not talking about men modeling two-piece bikinis. I’m talking about a world where media focused on the male body to sell. What if, in a complete turn of events, men were used to sell makeup and beauty products?

Well it looks like I don’t have to wonder anymore because China has already begun to turn the tables. In China, Maybelline now uses male celebrities to sell beauty products to women. Clearly, this move is timed perfectly with the successful rise of idols. So far, they have enlisted Taiwanese pop star and actor Ko Chen-tung.

 

 

We’re not blind — we understand the problems with this idea. The biggest criticism we foresee is the commercial’s shift from “this product makes me beautiful” to “this product will help me impress hot guys.” Obviously, we’re rooting for commercials which advocate for self-love instead of being beautiful for someone else.

But we can’t deny that we’re quite amused with this concept. For starters, maybe men will realize how difficult it is when media sets such high standards. Also, let me just be honest here: I’m quite the happy camper when media recognizes that Asian men can be hot. Don’t you hate that stereotype? I can’t tell you how many times I’ve rolled my eyes at mainstream media portraying Asian men as unappealing. Clearly, China knows that stereotype is wrong and they’re not afraid to show it.

Check out the commercial below and tell us what you think!

 

 

(Source)

This Will Melt Your Heart: The Struggle of Two Brothers Fighting for a Better Life

In 2011, the Boston Globe’s Billy Baker wrote a story on Johnny and George Huynh– two impoverished teenage brothers who spent every day dreaming of better circumstances.

Baker delved deep into the lives of these brothers and discovered that their abusive father committed suicide leaving their mother to spend her days locked up in her room, succumbing to her mental health issues.

The boys supported themselves and had to work to afford basic necessities. Despite these adversaries, the story highlights the boys’ unyielding passion for academics. Though they had to take the bus to get there, the boys attended a prestigious Boston high school and achieved top grades. This gave them a tiny ray of hope that things could change.

“I just want to fit in,’’ Johnny told Baker. “I’m tired of being known as that poor kid who is struggling.’’

The story goes on to describe the boys giving a emotional speech for the Catholic Charity which often helped them when they were in need.

The first half of their speech is jokey, a back-and-forth about who is taller, who is smarter, culminating with a story of the time their mother received a turkey from Catholic Charities. She didn’t know what to do with it so she stuffed it with noodles. The crowd laughs.

Things are going well; their delivery is better than in rehearsals. Then they get to the second half of the speech, the part about their father’s death.

First, George tells the story of that night when the police came to the door, carrying their father’s photo. Then Johnny picks up the story. “He was only 54,’’ he says. “He took his own life. And we didn’t have any money.’’

 

As he says the word “money,’’ Johnny cracks. He tries to push on, but the words won’t come out of his throat.

After bringing the audience to tears, Johnny concluded the speech by saying, “There are times when we all need to depend on the kindness of strangers.”

And then the story finishes and readers are left hoping that the two boys really do find a way to turn their lives around. Fast-forward a couple of years and it turns out that their story isn’t done after all. A few days ago, Baker began tweeting about the brothers. As it turns out, Baker was touched by the story and let the boys into his own life.

His tweets may very well melt your heart.

Screen Shot 2013-12-18 at 3.23.27 PM Screen Shot 2013-12-18 at 3.23.34 PM Screen Shot 2013-12-18 at 3.51.34 PM Screen Shot 2013-12-18 at 3.51.45 PM Screen Shot 2013-12-18 at 3.51.53 PM Screen Shot 2013-12-18 at 3.52.04 PM

Screen Shot 2013-12-18 at 3.53.13 PM Screen Shot 2013-12-18 at 3.53.21 PM Screen Shot 2013-12-18 at 3.53.37 PM Screen Shot 2013-12-18 at 3.53.48 PM Screen Shot 2013-12-18 at 3.54.17 PM Screen Shot 2013-12-18 at 3.54.29 PM Screen Shot 2013-12-18 at 3.54.37 PM Screen Shot 2013-12-18 at 3.54.46 PM Screen Shot 2013-12-18 at 3.54.55 PM Screen Shot 2013-12-18 at 3.55.05 PM Screen Shot 2013-12-18 at 3.55.13 PM Screen Shot 2013-12-18 at 3.55.22 PM Screen Shot 2013-12-18 at 3.55.31 PM Screen Shot 2013-12-18 at 3.55.39 PM

Screen Shot 2013-12-18 at 3.56.52 PM Screen Shot 2013-12-18 at 3.57.00 PM Screen Shot 2013-12-18 at 3.57.11 PM Screen Shot 2013-12-18 at 3.57.21 PM Screen Shot 2013-12-18 at 3.57.31 PM Screen Shot 2013-12-18 at 3.57.41 PM Screen Shot 2013-12-18 at 3.57.50 PM Screen Shot 2013-12-18 at 3.57.58 PM Screen Shot 2013-12-18 at 3.58.08 PM Screen Shot 2013-12-18 at 3.58.16 PM Screen Shot 2013-12-18 at 3.58.26 PM Screen Shot 2013-12-18 at 4.27.11 PM Screen Shot 2013-12-18 at 4.27.21 PM Screen Shot 2013-12-18 at 4.27.30 PM Screen Shot 2013-12-18 at 4.27.38 PM Screen Shot 2013-12-18 at 4.27.48 PM Screen Shot 2013-12-18 at 4.27.56 PM Screen Shot 2013-12-18 at 4.28.06 PM Screen Shot 2013-12-18 at 4.28.16 PM Screen Shot 2013-12-18 at 4.28.26 PM Screen Shot 2013-12-18 at 4.29.03 PM Screen Shot 2013-12-18 at 4.29.12 PM Screen Shot 2013-12-18 at 4.29.20 PM Screen Shot 2013-12-18 at 4.29.28 PM Screen Shot 2013-12-18 at 4.29.36 PM Screen Shot 2013-12-18 at 4.29.46 PM Screen Shot 2013-12-18 at 4.29.53 PM Screen Shot 2013-12-18 at 4.30.00 PM Screen Shot 2013-12-18 at 4.30.07 PM Screen Shot 2013-12-18 at 4.30.16 PM Screen Shot 2013-12-18 at 4.30.27 PM Screen Shot 2013-12-18 at 4.30.34 PM Screen Shot 2013-12-18 at 4.30.41 PM Screen Shot 2013-12-18 at 4.30.48 PM Screen Shot 2013-12-18 at 4.30.54 PM Screen Shot 2013-12-18 at 4.31.00 PM

(source 1, 2)

Proof That This Push-Up Bra Works: The Portrayal of The Transgender Community

A few months ago, this Thai push-up bra commercial went viral. The original video gained over 9 million views since being uploaded:

In honor of LGBT History Month, we decided to bring this video back and take a closer look. It’s clear why the video has so many views with its unexpected ending. Generally, the video was well-received. One viewer commented, “He is attractive both as a girl and a boy.” Another humored viewer commented, “Well the push-up bra definitely works then.”

Although there were still a share of individuals who argued that they were “tricked” and showed anger towards the commercial, people were generally entertained. The commercial didn’t present the transgender community in a negative light and did not try to make fun of it.

ad lucky strike holiday

This is not necessarily the case for all Thai commercials containing transgender characters. The following IKEA commercial angered the Thai Transgender Alliance for being “negative,” “stereotypical,” and a “gross violation of human rights.”

The commercial shows a couple walking through IKEA. The woman becomes so excited with a sale for pillows that her voice drops and horrifies her boyfriend. The end shows the boyfriend running off in the opposite direction. The Thai Transgender Alliance argues that “the transgender content of the advertisement is negative and stereotypical in nature, perpetuating misunderstanding transgenderism as human sexuality for ‘deceitful and deviant lifestyle.’”

Unfortunately, this is not the first time IKEA has poked fun at the transgender community. Another IKEA commercial, this time coming from France, shows a woman getting ready to go out. She accidentally knocks into a low table and hits her crotch– revealing she was physically born a man.

Although the difference between the first commercial and the last two may seem slight to some, it makes a load of difference. There is a clear distinction between a commercial showing someone proud of their gender identity versus another commercial showing an individual running away from a transgender out of fear.

In honor of LGBT history month, lets try to make it a lasting habit to stay conscious of these differences.

The Lucky Gal: Eva Chen Becomes First Asian American EIC at Condé Nast

I’ve always been a huge fan of Eva Chen. I’ve been following her since her start at Teen Vogue and thought of her as a role model – not just career wise, but personally as well (her impeccable style!). However, when she left her post as the Beauty and Health Director at Teen Vogue, many have wondered what her next big stint would be. Since then, she’s done some high-profile consulting and held some contributing editor positions.

Now – she’s been named the new Editor-in-Chief of Lucky. Even cooler – she’s also the first Asian American Editor-in-Chief of Condé Nast Publications. Condé Nast Artistic Director Anna Wintour had some choice words about Eva:

“From the streets of New York City to Shanghai and everywhere in between, Eva is the quintessential Lucky girl,” Wintour said in a Condé-issued statement. “Lucky’s September issue will be her first opportunity to showcase her leadership ability, and I have every confidence she will meet the moment head-on.”

Congrats, Eva! We’re excited to see what you have in store for Lucky!

Source