Olivia Munn Joins ‘X-Men: Apocalypse’ as Psylocke


While X-Men: Apocalypse is still in its early pre-production stages, the producer Bryan Singer has been utilizing Instagram to make some major announcements about the movie’s progress. For instance, we recently discovered that newcomer Lana Condor would join the cast as the hand sparking mutant, Jubilee.

But she’s not the only Asian American you can look forward to seeing in X-Men: Apocalypse. Adding onto the mutant list, Singer’s recent Instagram post welcomes Audrey cover girl, Olivia Munn, to the team as Psylocke.

Not familiar with Psylocke? Born with the name Betsy Braddock, Psylocke is the twin to Brian Braddock, better known as Captain Britain. By the time their parents died (murdered by the computer Mastermind), Betsy had become a charter pilot. While flying home with her brothers to escape an attack from Mastermind’s agent, Doctor Synne, Betsy fell victim Synne’s psychic attack, which caused her to crash her plane. It’s believed that the mental intrusions of Doctor Synne was the start of Betsy’s precognitive powers and the birth of Psylocke.


Excited to welcome @oliviamunn as Betsy Braddock! #Psylocke #XmenApocalypse #XMEN

A photo posted by Bryan Singer (@bryanjaysinger) on


You may remember Olivia Munn as the iconic host of the G4’s Attack of the Show, a tech-gaming variety show. Together with co-host Kevin Pereira, Munn raised Attack of the Show to cult status, gaining a large following among the “tech-geek” audience who embraced Munn’s quirky blend of humor, tomboy attitude and sex appeal. It’s great to see her go from the hot dog-chugging TV host to telepathic mutant!

As Marvel continues to increase their number of Asian American female characters, like Ms. Marvel, Silk and many more, we hope to see just as many Asian Americans on the big screen in the near future. Keep ‘em coming, Marvel.

Newcomer Lana Condor will Play Jubilee in ‘X-Men Apocalypse’

Yesterday, X-Men: Apocalypse director Bryan Singer posted a picture of actress Lana Condor on Instagram to announce she will play the character Jubilee in the upcoming film. In the X-Men comics, Jubilee is a teenage mutant who attacks enemies using “explosive plasmoids” from her hand. She is most recognizable for her trademark yellow raincoat and goggles.

Not much info can be found on this young actress since Jubilee will be her first role. Despite this, we are beyond happy to see more Asians in major comic book films and we can only hope that Lana Candor will have a big part as Jubilee in this upcoming film. After all, Chinese superstar Fan BingBing, who played the character Blink in X-Men: Days of Future Past, had a rough estimate of two lines and five minutes of screentime in the overstuffed film.

We’ll keep our fingers crossed for Lana and for the possibility of more Asian American actors on screen soon. Lately, there have been an increase of Asian American comic book characters such as Kamala Khan in Ms. Marvel, Silk and a few others. Since most of the blockbusters seem to be comic book adaptations nowadays, let’s hope the casting of Jubilee is part of an increasing trend!


ASIANS IN COMICS: Long Beach Comic Con 2014



To my right, Harley Quinn was posing for a picture with Deadpool and Groot. To my left, Chewbaca and a female Loki were casually sipping coffee together. Up ahead, a giant wall was filled with Funko pop vinyls of every Marvel, DC, The Walking Dead and Game of Thrones character imaginable.

Yup, I was definitely at a Comic Con.

Long Beach Comic Con was held on September 27th and 28th at the Long Beach Convention Center. The official website describes the event as “a celebration of comic books and pop culture that showcases the exceptional works of talented writers, artists, illustrators and creators of all types of pop culture.”

Although Long Beach Comic Con (LBCC) is much smaller than the famed San Diego Comic Con, it certainly didn’t disappoint. In fact, many of the LBCC guests said they preferred the more intimate experience provided by a smaller convention. I admit, I enjoyed that this convention didn’t include pushing, shoving, occasional biting and the general crazy that came along with some of the other conventions I’ve been to. Don’t get me wrong though– there was no shortage of passionate geeking out, squealing fangirls and men who made the poor decision to skip their morning shower in order to be the first in line. No, it wouldn’t be a Comic Con without all that.

And while everything seemed to grab at my attention, there was one thing in particular that caught my eye. Sure, the cosplayers took up all of my camera’s memory and the venders took all of my wallet’s money, but what really captivated me was Artist Alley. Everyone from amateurs to famed illustrators gathered at Artist Alley to share their passion for art.

My mission was simple: I was on a hunt to find Asian American artists who went against the career stereotypes of our community (Doctor, lawyer, doctor, pharmacist, engineer and did I say doctor?) to follow their dreams of being an illustrator. When we announced the creation of Marvel’s Asian American superheroes, Ms. Marvel and Silk, our audience reacted with absolute delight. It was clear that people want to see diversity in their superheroes, but what about the people behind these superheroes? Would it be difficult to find Asian American artists? Do Asians truly turn away from this profession because of family expectations, or was that simply a stereotype of the past?

I went to find out. Check out some of the incredible artists that I found at this year’s Long Beach Comic Con.






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Albert Nguyen
Age: 32
City: St. Paul, Minnesota, currently in San Francisco 
Favorite Superhero: Wolverine
(I have a theory that kids like superheroes based on how they grew up– I grew up as one of the only Asians in Minnesota, so I always felt very different from everyone. All of the X-Men appealed to me, but Wolverine seemed extra different, so I liked him most.)

What do you do?
I’m an illustrator. I do a lot of Star Wars and some Ninja Turtles stuff. My shtick is putting pop culture icons into famous paintings or famous photographs.

What’s the most favorite thing you’ve worked on?
That’s always changing. I usually like what I’m working on next the best. I see all the ways I could have done things better in my older work. I did once do an oil painting of a friend’s dog wearing a Star Trek uniform and that is definitely up there for favorites though.

Asians in comics?
There’s actually a lot of Asians working as creative professionals! I wonder if it’s taking the discipline of growing up Asian and all the energy you should have put into studying for the MCAT and putting it into drawing that pushes Asians to be really good. I like that art is very close to a pure meritocracy too– if you’re good, people will see that. I think it’s easier in art for that to come through clearly. Race is a sticky thing in modern America. We want to believe we’re beyond racism and bigotry and often uncomfortable talking about it, but it’s there. And it’s definitely there in a lot of non-nerd workplaces. The nerd community has definitely been a very progressive place though. [The Nerd community] is just everyone that’s ever felt different all come together in one place. I think that a lot of nerds have felt ostracized and I have seen that the community is good at accepting others.

Asian characters, that’s still lacking. There really aren’t that many Asian pop culture characters. Most Asian males who are in movies seem to be martial arts masters or really good at drifting. Most Asian female characters tend to get played up as exotic. We need more Asian role models who are fairly normal people. Glenn (Steven Yeun) from Walking Dead is awesome though.  John Cho is doing a lot of good work too.

How did your family react to your career choice?
(laughs) Well I didn’t go into this blind. Being Asian, my parents just wanted to know that I knew what I was doing. I’ve been doing these shows off and on, on top of my day job, for years and I’ve been collecting more and more money. My girlfriend’s actually a financial analyst so she built a financial model for me to project what a year would look like for me. So I presented that to my dad who’s an actuary and he got it.

What can we look forward to from you in the future?
I’m planning to branch out into more properties. Next I think I’m going to do Harley and Joker as Bonnie and Clyde.






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Dustin Nguyen
Age: 38
City: LA/Long Beach and now currently in Fountain Valley
Favorite Superhero: Batman :)

What do you do?
I’ve been with DC for around 14 years. I’ve drawn all kinds of Batman stuff, but now I’m moving on to my own book with Image. I’m still doing stuff with DC—a lot of toys and designs for their stuff, but my main focus right now is in creating my own property.

What’s the most favorite thing you’ve worked on?
My favorite thing I’m working on.. is always the project I’m working on now, you know what I mean? The one I’m most proud of right now is Li’l Gotham because we pitched that half a decade ago, like 6-7 years ago and it finally got off the ground. It was the closest to something that I own because DC owns Batman. It was something that was as fun to work on as it was for us to read it. Right now, I’m working on Descender over at Image. I always love the next thing and hate the last thing.

Asians in comics?
I don’t think being Asian has ever created an obstacle for me in anyway in my past 15 years in comics, or has even come up ( aside from the usual jokes at meetings and dinner). If it means anything, some of the best artists working in the industry today are Asian. Jim Lee, who’s not only the most sought after and best-selling artist in comics ever (also happens to be the head co-publisher of DC Comics), is Asian. Comics is one of those industries in entertainment and pop culture where there is truly free range to be creative, regardless of who you are. Unlike music, or Hollywood, the consumer and fans see very little of the talent themselves, but more our creations. So in a way, we don’t really matter, and I think that can be a great thing. Mostly because some artists and writers are weird as hell.

As far as Asian characters themselves in comic books, I think there are a few. Definitely not a lot, but I dont have a problem with that at all. It’s safe to say I like Batman because he’s got a great back story, amazing aesthetic development as a character over the years, and just freaking cool. I’ve never once stopped and thought ‘it would be so cool if he was Asian.. like me.’

Also, I’ll be honest and say the reason there are not many Asian characters in comics, might be because they haven’t made one worthwhile yet, whether through purpose or story. The worst thing you can do when creating a character is creating one for the sole purpose of pandering to a certain demographic– whether Asian, Black, Gay, whatever. Unfortunately, that’s what I’ve seen being done a lot by the higher ups in corporations. It’s insulting to the demographic, and cheapens the character and therefore doesn’t last. Story should come first.

How did your family react to your career choice?
My mom was real cool with it. I grew up in LA and she was always like ‘as long as you’re not in jail, awesome. As long as you have a plan, awesome. ’She was really supportive. She knew I loved to draw and you know, she really saw that there was no money in it. She said ‘you know you’re never gonna make a living, but hey, you’re out of trouble.’ So she was real supportive. My brothers and sisters were all UCLA grads so she was like ‘oh if I lose one, it’s fine’ (laughs) and then it got better so she was fine. She actually has all of my books and she brings it back to Vietnam.

What can we look forward to from you in the future?
Descender definitely. It’s our book that comes out in March. Then next month Li’l Gotham has a toy line coming out—they’re tiny little figure, you can get them with a stand and everything. One statue that I just worked on was Catwoman and we made that into a toyline, but it took 3 years to get going. I have an exclusive cover coming out with Scott Snyder.






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Kristen “Hapa” Lau
Age: 28
City: Alhambra, California
Favorite Superhero: Wonderwoman!
(Beauty Brains and Brawn! Plus, who can resist Linda Carter and that jazzy action fighting theme song?! I sure can’t! She’s AMAZING!)

What do you do?
I’m currently a Freelance Character Designer/Illustrator working for various clients. I have been getting mentored for Character Design and Development alongside Mark Mcdonnell who is a current Disney Master Instructor, whom has helped expand my knowledge and grow as a designer.

What’s the most favorite thing you’ve worked on?
Wow! That’s a hard question! Each piece has its own unique quality to it. I’m jumping into stylization, dynamics, character and overall…. just having fun in what I do! I’m always testing my versatility and challenging myself in shapes and design. I’ve been very lucky and honored to be featured at a few recent gallery shows in LA this year so that helped me tap into the different worlds and genres in my pieces and put my own little twist into it. The most rewarding feeling I get is when I see people smiling at my work. A smile can say so much without saying anything at all– and that keeps me going!

Asians in comics?
I think Asians and Asian Americans are definitely on the radar in this industry. There is so much wonderful talent out there, it’s beyond exciting! I not only have one perspective, I’m lucky to have 3. I’m Asian, Hispanic and American. In all three, it comes down to the same denomination– The work, the passion and your personality.

I’m new in this industry– taking courses, observing, learning, executing everyday. As an artist, all of us are learning and our work is always changing, nothing really stays the same in what we do and THAT’s the exciting part of it—- you can definitely see it in one’s work.  No matter who you are and what your background is, it’s the life in what you do, in what you draw, and your personality combined that shows the true talent and makes one shine bright.

How did your family react to your career choice?
(laughs) Quite well actually. My mother was and still is my ROCK. She was very supportive in what I wanted to do. She’d seen it first hand, so it was no surprise to her that I would be come an artist.

My mother would actually look up courses in community college courses that didn’t have an age requirement and sign me up when I was in middle school  So I was the youngest rugrat there. I didn’t care at all because, heck (yes I said said heck), I got to draw! She supported everything I did. Recently I spoke with her and she reminded me about how I would draw in elementary school and charge .25-.50 per drawing of my classmates’ favorite cartoon characters. I would even sell drawings at my mom’s yard sales! My mom and grandparents were very supportive and I’m glad they saw something in me before I even did.

What can we look forward to from you in the future?
I’m currently working on my first ashcan book full of my daily doodles and drawings I’ve done in the past couple of years. It’s been such a fun ride where I documented my quirks, experiences, notes, drawings and rough sketches — including some of the recent work and new pieces! It’s set to release February 2015 at Long Beach Comic Con Expo so be on the look out for it!






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Ryan Odagawa
Age: 38
City: Los Angeles
Favorite Superhero: Wolverine

What do you do?
I’m a comic book artist and a storyboard revisionist. I do comics and I do my own comic called Shadowzone and I also do freelance work.

What’s the most favorite thing you’ve worked on?
My first job at WildStorm working with Jim Lee. I’ve worked on The Heroes, an online graphic novel for NBC. More recently, I worked on the Cheetos bag – I drew Chester Cheetah. Also, one of the recent jobs I had was on the Ultimate Spiderman cartoon and that was a lot of fun.

Asians in comics?
I think there seems to be a lot of Asians in the art field. I know a lot of Asian parents traditionally want their kids to be doctors, lawyers, etc., but it’s not really what the kid wants to do.  Seems like things have changed over the years where Asians can make a great living doing art. Especially in the Movie or Game industry.

How did your family react to your career choice?
My family was fine with my decision. My dad and several of our relatives on his side are artists, so it was not a big deal. I wanted to start working when I was in high school, but I remember my mom said, “You have to graduate high school first!”

What can we look forward to from you in the future?
Right now I’m working on my own graphic novel called Shadowzone, so I’m currently developing the characters and story.






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Whilce Portacio
Age: 52
City: Born in Cavite City, Philippines. Currently in California
Favorite Superhero: The Silver Surfer

What do you do?
I am now what we call a Creator, I do everything– I pencil, ink, color and create the characters and the story

What’s the most favorite thing you’ve worked on?
So far, it was the creation of the X-Men character Bishop…I was able to create a character I thought was interesting and when the comicbook was published, it was gratifying to see that the audience thought he was interesting too. So it is now a great pleasure to see him in a movie this year.

Asians in comics?
Even before me, there have always been Asian artists. It seems to me that we not only have a great desire to imagine the fantastic, but we somehow have skills needed to realize thee goals.

In the bigger perspective, the world has already gone through the let’s say, “European” myths, legends, heroes…now the world audience in hungry for something new, and since there is an abundance of Asian characters, myths, legends, and heroes that have yet to be presented to the world, I believe it is time to expose all of that, and that the world audience will embrace this new outlook.

How did your family react to your career choice?
I have been winning art awards since the sixth grade, so when I decided to try art as a career, they gave me the chance to try. Like most Asians they didn’t feel it was a good career move, especially me being an honor student. When I made it they quietly accepted it because I could make a living with it. Now that comics are celebrated by society at large they are proud.

What can we look forward to from you in the future?
My partner-creator Glen Brunswick and I just recently launched our book (sci-fi) called Non-Humans for Image Comics, and we are now producing the Second Arc.

Then I am building a studio in Manila to do just this. I have also partnered with young filmmakers to produce them into film. I will then form a school to discover and train aspiring young artists.






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Ann Shen
Age: 29
City: Orange, California
Favorite Superhero: Wonder Woman

What do you do?
I’m an illustrator.

What’s the most favorite thing you’ve worked on?
A HarperCollins book cover for “Say What You Will”

Asians in comics?
I think that everyone should pursue their dreams and follow their heart, regardless of their ethnic background. The comic book and art world is a place where someone can really take on and address the issues of representation they feel is lacking in mainstream media; it all starts here in your own hands.

How did your family react to your career choice?
When I said I wanted to be an artist as a kid, my mom was freaked out. However, as I got older, I never shook the creative bug and first became a writer and photographer, which eventually led to art school to become an illustrator and designer. My family is fully supportive of my career choice now, especially since my work can be found in stores like Target and Anthropologie!

What can we look forward to from you in the future?
A variety of projects I can’t talk about yet, hopefully coming to your bookstores soon, and booths at more shows! I’ll be at DesignerCon and CTNx here in the L.A. area this November.




Feature photo by Dustin Nguyen, courtesy of www.dccomics.com




Marvel’s Newest Superhero Is An Asian American Woman


Exciting news for comic book fans! Back in November of 2013, Marvel revealed their first Pakistani superhero, Ms. Marvel. Underneath the suit was 16-year-old Kamala Khan, a Pakistani-American Muslim teenager.

Well it looks like Marvel is ready to put another Asian American woman on the superhero grid. Cindy Moon, who goes by the name Silk, will have her own comic book series by February 2015.

If you think she resembles Spiderman, you’re right. In fact, Silk was bitten by the very same radioactive spider that bit Peter Parker. Silk made her first appearance in Amazing Spider-Man where we learn that she has been locked away in a facility for years. We also discover that she was trained for six years to adequately use her powers. As a result, she is superior to Spiderman when it comes to speed, spider sense, and can create webs from her fingertips as opposed to Spiderman who must use artificial web-fluid.

Silk will be scripted by Robbie Thompson, the series will be drawn by Stacey Lee and Dave Johnson will be providing covers. In an interview, Robbie Thompson describes some of what we can expect from the series:

I can’t speak to the specifics of “Spider-Verse,” but it definitely has an enormous impact on her growth. One of the things that’s most exciting about her character is that she’s suddenly on this crash course of “how to be a grown up.” How do you land a job? Or have a life? What’s it like to have lost all that time?   That’s what she’s dealing with as Cindy Moon. Then on the Silk side she’s on a crash course of how to be a super hero. She’s been dipped into a pretty massive story with “Spider-Verse” and the adventures she has during it with Spider-Woman. So I think she’s learned a lot and had to grow up pretty fast, but she’s still on that growing curve. We’re going to be exploring more of that in the ongoing book. It’s about her growing up and really learning how to have both a personal life and a super hero life.

Read the entire interview here.   Screen Shot 2014-10-14 at 5.24.13 PM Screen Shot 2014-10-14 at 5.24.22 PM

Indonesian Artists Create Must-See DISNEY x MARVEL Crossovers

Milk and cookies. Peanut and jelly. Justin Timberlake and Britney Spears. We may never find out who the geniuses are behind the most known and beloved combinations, but every now and then, we get lucky.

In this case, we’ve found out that Indonesian illustrators from Stellar Labs are the brilliant minds who decided to combine the two powerhouses, Marvel and Disney.

As many already know, Marvel Entertainment belongs to the Walt Disney company, but aside from a Captain America doll placed on the same shelf as a Mickey toy in the Disney store, we don’t really see the two worlds interact. No matter how much we love both Marvel and Disney, we’ve never seen a Disney character step foot into the Marvel universe — until now.

Stellar Labs, an art studio based in Jakarta, Indonesia, decided to combine Maleficent with Loki, have Thor meet Rapunzel and even put all the evil villains together in one portrait.

The results? Everything we wanted and more. Check out all the creative mash ups below for yourself.

DONALD THE THOR by illustrator Agri Karuniawan

DONALD THE THOR by illustrator Agri Karuniawan

MALEFICENT X LOKI by illustrator Bramasta Aji

MALEFICENT X LOKI by illustrator Bramasta Aji

TARZAN THOR by illustrator Eko Puteh

TARZAN THOR by illustrator Eko Puteh

THORUNZEL by illustrator Fahriza Kamaputra

THORUNZEL by illustrator Fahriza Kamaputra

VILLAINS by illustrator Isuardi Therianto

VILLAINS by illustrator Isuardi Therianto

FIX-IT HULK by illustrators Miralti Firmansyah & Jessica Kholinne

FIX-IT HULK by illustrators Miralti Firmansyah & Jessica Kholinne

POOH & FRIENDS by illustrator Natasha Elizabeth

POOH & FRIENDS by illustrator Natasha Elizabeth

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PRINCE TONY by illustrator Ryan Adriandhy

DONALD'S BACKYARD PARTEE by illustrator Yenny Laud

DONALD’S BACKYARD PARTEE by illustrator Yenny Laud

To check out more of Steller Lab’s work, visit their official Facebook page here.

Jamie Chung and Daniel Henney Cast in Disney’s “Big Hero 6″

No strangers to kicking butt, Jamie Chung and Daniel Henney have joined cast of Disney and Marvel’s upcoming animated action-comedy, Big Hero 6, which hits theaters Nov. 7. Directors Don Hall and Chris Williams unveiled the young superhero team yesterday.

Big Hero 6 is set in the fictional San Fransokyo, a metropolis where underground robot fights are all the rage. Hiro Hamada (voiced by Ryan Potter), a 14-year-old robotics prodigy, and his robot Baymax (Scott Adsitt) must join forces with a group of inexperienced crime-fighting “techie heroes” when they uncover a dangerous plot.

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Chung voices GoGo Tomago, who is described as a “laconic Clint Eastwood type” who can take care of herself. An industrial engineering student, Go Go developed a bike with magnetic-levitation technology, which also made its way into her super-suit.

Henney voices Tadashi Hamada, the older brother of Hiro, who is heavily involved in the underground bot fights. Tadashi, fortunately, helps inspire Hiro to put his smarts to good use and gain admission to the San Fransokyo Institute of Technology, where he meets a robot named Baymax (voiced by Scott Adsitt). Together, they join forces with the four others to complete the crucial mission.

The team includes Fred (T.J. Miller), a big sci-fi and comic book geek whose “Fredzilla” creature suit is a homage to Godzilla. Honey Lemon (Genesis Rodriguez) is a chemistry student who is a bit geeky, but her sweet personality, positive attitude, and smarts make her a valuable member of the team. Wasabi (Damon Wayans Jr.) sports plasma-induced lasers that come out of his arms, but he’s very cautious about how to go about being a superhero-until he learns to embrace the crazy that comes with the job.

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-Story by James S. Kim
This story was originally published on iamkoream.com 

Images via 
USA Today


Meet Blink: Fan Bingbing In “X-Men: Days of Future Past”

Among the many reasons we’re excited for X-Men: Days of Future Past, Fan Bingbing’s new character Blink definitely ranks up there on the list.

32-year-old Chinese actress Fan Bingbing began her career in 1996 in the Chinese television series Princess Pearl. Since then, she has been in a number of notable films, was ranked first on the “50 Most Beautiful People in China” list in 2010 and has been in Forbes China Celebrity 100 list since 2006. 

In X-Men: Days of Future Past, Bingbing plays the Blink– a mutant in the Marvel comics who has the ability to teleport. She can teleport herself as well as large masses such as groups of people. Blink also has the capability to create teleportation portals. Additionally, she is a skilled hand-to-hand fighter and proves that she is a force to be reckoned with.

Blink became a fan favorite in the early 2000’s and was even featured in the four-issue Blink limited series. 

Just yesterday, X-Men: Days of Future Past released a trailer introducing us to the much-anticipated character. Check it out below:

Sailor Moon Characters Re-imagined as The Avengers

Yesterday, we showed you what happens when an artist re-imagines some of the most beloved Disney characters in the opposite gender. Today, we have yet another artist blowing us away with creativity.

An artist known as Jei Shepard caught our attention for this impressive artwork. Not much is known about this artist. In fact, all we know is a list of interests on Jei Shepard’s tumblr which include Iron Man, Avengers, X-Men, Batman, Supergirl, Mass Effect, Sailor Moon, Dragonball Z, Final Fantasy, BBC Sherlock, Grimm and Agents of SHIELD.

Luckily for us, Jei Shepard decided to take two of those interests for a crossover: Sailor Moon and the Avengers. The result is better than anyone could have expected.

Even though these girls aren’t actually Marvel superheros, they certainly look good in the outfits. Check it out below and be sure to support Jei Shepard’s art here.

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Korean Actress Cast in Upcoming ‘Avengers 2′, Sources Say

Story by Young Rae Kim.

Korean actress Kim Soo Hyun was reportedly cast in the upcoming blockbuster sequel Avengers 2: Age of Ultron, according to Twitch Film.

Kim, 28, not to be confused with the popular male actor with the same name, is not well known outside of Korea and previously went by the stage name Yoo Ri-el. Still, it was reported that she beat out dozens of other actresses — including some top-tier names — to snag a supporting role as a doctor who helps Iron Man. Her English proficiency and familiarity with the action genre reportedly helped her cause.

Marvel has stated that at least 10 to 15 minutes of the film will be set in the swanky Gangnam district of Seoul. Marvel has already hired one of Korea’s top production teams and domestic shooting is scheduled to begin in the spring in Seoul and Incheon.

Kim who has appeared in Seventh Grade Civil Servant and The Fugitive: Plan B, grew up abroad and speaks fluent English, according to the Korea Times. She began her career as a model and signed to the same agency as Daniel Henney.

According to her management agency, Kim is still waiting for Marvel to confirm the casting.

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This story was originally published in iamkoream.com

Marvel’s New Pakistani Superhero

Lets face it– the presence of Asians in American media is not as prominent as we’d like. In fact, this number gets even smaller when we look at specific categories like the comicbook world. Luckily, this seems to be slowly, but surely changing.

We had put together a list of Asians in Comics to celebrate the Asian creators and characters who are making strides in the comicbook world and it looks like we have another big addition to make on this list.

Recently, Marvel Comics has revealed their reimagined version of the character, Ms. Marvel. Much to our delight, this hero’s alter ego is not a white, male millionaire. The new Ms. Marvel is 16-year-old Kamala Khan, a Pakistani-American Muslim teenager.

Comics writer G. Willow Wilson says that Kahn “struggles to reconcile being an American teenager with the conservative customs of her Pakistani Muslim family. Like a lot of children of immigrants, she feels torn between two worlds: the family she loves, but which drives her crazy, and her peers, who don’t really understand what her home life is like.”

Creators say they will stray away from the “token minority” character and instead deal with some very deep personal struggles.

Of course, creators recognize the risks that accompany Khan’s character. Will others be against her ethnic background and religious beliefs? Will Pakistani or Muslim individuals feel a misrepresentation with this character?

The comic’s editor Sana Amanat admits, “I do expect some negativity, not only from people who are anti-Muslim, but people who are Muslim and might want the character portrayed in a particular light.”

But creators have decided to be brave and go through with the character. In fact, they claim they will address the various labels that society places on Kahn and show how such labels affect her sense of self.

Kahn is the first Muslim character to headline a book at Marvel. Ms. Marvel will launch in February 2014 and we simply cannot wait.