Learn How to Make Traditional Korean Dishes From A Korean Rapper

Instagram videos seem to be getting more and more creative. You can find everything from quick comedic clips to a short vacation documentary. But what about a video series?

Oogeewoogee recently featured Korean American rapper, Lyricks, who began a mini cooking series which showcase step-by-step instructions on recreating traditional Korean dishes on his Instagram. During the snowy season at his home in Northern Virginia, he shows followers how to make kimchi, a spicy fermented cabbage that is a staple side dish with meals. He also shows his process of cooking braised mackerel for his girlfriend on Valentine’s Day. As a cute and hilarious bonus, Lyricks also includes a few tips he learned from his “halmeoni” (grandma).

Step 1. SALT SOAK #kimchi #koreanfood

A video posted by LYRICKS | THE BEAUTIFUL CYCLE (@lyricksva) on Jan 3, 2015 at 5:01pm PST

Step 2. PREP THE MIX #kimchi #koreanfood A video posted by LYRICKS | THE BEAUTIFUL CYCLE (@lyricksva) on Jan 3, 2015 at 5:05pm PST

Step 3. ANCHOVY SHRIMP COLLABO

A video posted by LYRICKS | THE BEAUTIFUL CYCLE (@lyricksva) on Jan 3, 2015 at 5:11pm PST

Step 4. TALK SHIT (ADD PEPPER, ONIONS, SCALLIONS, GARLIC) A video posted by LYRICKS | THE BEAUTIFUL CYCLE (@lyricksva) on Jan 3, 2015 at 5:15pm PST

Step 5. SUGAR X RICE FLOUR

A video posted by LYRICKS | THE BEAUTIFUL CYCLE (@lyricksva) on Jan 3, 2015 at 5:31pm PST

Step 6. ADD THE REST A video posted by LYRICKS | THE BEAUTIFUL CYCLE (@lyricksva) on Jan 3, 2015 at 5:36pm PST

Step 7. MIX (NICELY)

A video posted by LYRICKS | THE BEAUTIFUL CYCLE (@lyricksva) on Jan 3, 2015 at 5:44pm PST

 

As Lyricks would say… Boom Bap!

I found his commentary quite entertaining and I look forward to seeing what else he whipped up for his followers, but was left curious at what some of the Korean words meant. Anyone want to help out and translate?

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This Korean Bride Had 54 Marriages in 50 States

 
Within many Asian American families, there is a lot of pressure for daughters to get married by a certain age. For instance, performance artist Maria Yoon felt intense pressure from her father to marry a “well-suited Korean guy.” Frustrated to the point where she avoided spending time with family all together, Yoon decided to create a performance art piece where she married 54 men, women and inanimate objects in 50 states, dressed in the traditional hanbok that is common attire for traditional Korean weddings.

Yoon started her journey in Las Vegas, accompanying a friend who won the 44 million lottery. She decided to start making marriage proposals to anyone she was interested in and in that trip alone, married her waiter’s friend and a Diana Ross impersonator “she fell in love with” at a drag show. But after these two marriages, Yoon realized she couldn’t stop there. So Yoon traveled across the United States to all 50 states where she had 54 marriages to a fifth-generation cowboy from Wyoming, a lesbian woman in Massachusetts, a Maine lobster trap and many, many more.

While all these marriages are technically illegal, Yoon filmed her journey and made it into a a documentary called Maria the Korean Bride. Calling herself the “voice of unmarried Asian-American women,” Yoon says “this story isn’t just about [her] or [her] dad. It’s about America’s voice.” The trailer to her documentary is below:

 

Video of the Day: Korean Girls React to American Snacks

 

While there are many, many, many, many, many videos of Americans reacting to Asian food and pop culture, the reversal is less common. Now a new YouTube series called “Korean Girls React” flips the Americans-react-to-Asian-culture video trend on its head.

In this video, Korean girls taste American snacks for the very first time and give their honest opinion of it. The snacks include goldfish, poptarts, rice krispies, salt and vinegar chips, twizzlers, cheez-itz and warheads.

While there were obviously many different opinions, a couple of interesting trends emerged. Most of the girls agreed that the poptarts tasted too artificial. One girl even complained that “it tastes like a candle.” Rice krispies seemed to be a favorite amongst most of the girls whereas the twizzlers and warheads were very, very unpopular.

One thing that viewers all over the world should be able to relate to are the complaints that the snacks were too unhealthy or fattening, followed by later admissions that the snacks are too addicting to be left uneaten. Ah, the power of junk food!

Inside South Korean Label KUMANN YOO HYE JIN

 

“Futuristic Folklore” is a befitting title to understanding HyeJin Yoo’s perspectives on spring fashion with her presentation for KUMANN YOO HYE JIN 2015.  This isn’t a collection for those who prefer safer, ready-to-wear lines. This is about appreciating symbolism, engineering and a bit of mathematics.  Beauty is found within the heavily structured looks with a nod towards today’s science fiction animation and technology printed on pastel jacquards, organzas and cottons.  Yes, those are definitely spaceships.  If you aren’t into sci-fi, she has equally interesting and provoking designs in neutral to bright shades.

Yoo works endlessly to create masterpieces that are becoming the future we can expect from the Kumann studio, while she continues to build stability for the label.  We knew viewing her clothing would bring thoughtful discussion, so we reached out to learn more about this designer that expertly molds together so many contrasting ideas into a well-balanced and fluid collection.

HyeJin Yoo

Designer And Head of KUMANN, HyeJin Yoo, Image Courtesy Of Seoulfashionweek.org

Audrey Magazine: When you became the head of Kumann, how did you want to redefine the label, and how do feel that style translates into your current SS 2015 collection?
HyeJin Yoo: Kumann is the name originated from the early studio of the company. When I decided to start working on the label, I felt that I needed to reconsider the story of the studio, and its original value and identity. I have been re-identifying the brand’s characters in constructive design and original graphic patterns, which are based on different concepts of seasonal collections. Particularly, for spring and summer 2015, I interpret the concept of the future and folklore with specific color arrangements and computer-embroidered spaceship images made in 3D graphics.

AM: With the SS 2015 concept of “Futuristic Folklore,” have you always had an interest in those patterns and sci-fi animation?  What inspired you to put the two concepts together as one?
HJY: Sci-fi movies and ideas of cyborgs have been greatly influencing my ideas. I am directing the brand as a high-end boutique, but I do love to mix it up with images and symbols from sub-culture. I have also been very much interested in the theoretical ideas of time and space in a parallel universe, and in Buddhism. Basically, I think that people are very accustomed to a dichotomous way of thinking. Dualism affects our perceptions and languages by dividing things in the extreme, but I think that any of those two extremes could be blended just like other previous concepts, ‘Nostalgic Future’ and ‘Urban Shamanist’.

AM: What sort of emotions do you hope to evoke for viewers and wearers of your designs?
HJY: I am drawing a woman who wears uniqueness and originality of her own. I hope both viewers and wearers have exceptional experiences and at the same time will feel assertive and happy.

AM: Can you share with us some of the challenges and accomplishments you’ve had with your current collection?
HJY: Making clothes is accompanied with various problems, especially a small boutique business like us. I am trying to set stable and secure finances to save the scale of business. Since we have launched the brand named KUMANN, we also just opened a shop with a mid-low brand ‘K. kumann’ last September at DOOTA in Seoul. I am hoping that it could be a good start to keep the business safe.

AM: When you aren’t designing what are some of your favorite hobbies?
HJY: I’m trying not to think of anything while I’m not designing. It helps me to focus on what should be coming next. One of my favorites is walking in the places only I know, and think nothing, then I feel I get better and I can go back to work and people.

Below is more from the spring 2015 collection.

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Yoo’s Digitally Printed Spaceships

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More Sci-fi Options

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Dark Designs For Late Winter

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Classic Black And White

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Spring Pastels And Bold Accents

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Brighter Hues For Welcoming Summer

Feature image and all imagery is courtesy of HyeJin Yoo.  

 

Estée Lauder in Competition With Korean Skincare Brands

 

Estée Lauder, an American company which manufactures prestige beauty products, has made its mark in skincare for over 60 years. Today, it has become a household name for many.

Although Estée Lauder’s success is undeniable, they are well aware that times have changed and trends continuously shift directions.  According to Fashionista, Estée Lauder recognizes they are no longer spearheading the skincare forefront, but now Korean brands are breaking into the international field and successfully doing so. CEO of Estéee Lauder, Fabrizio Freda, admits that they’ve “[seen] this coming for a long time.”

“The way to compete with Korea is to embrace [these trends] and to bring them around the world. Our brands — Clinique, namely — has been one of the first to bring BB creams and CC trends to the U.S., which was actually a Korean trend,” says Freda.

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Photo courtesy of www.prettygossip.com

Photo courtesy of http://koreancosmetics.blogspot.com

Photo courtesy of http://koreancosmetics.blogspot.com

 

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What makes Korean skincare the leaders of the market? This article from Fast Company looks inside the booming Korean skincare market and reveals a number of explanations for its success.

For instance, 2011 marked the release of BB creams (a hydrating, anti-aging foundation with SPF) in the United States. As you can imagine, this new product was (and still is) all the rage. However, BB creams were already lining the shelves of Korean stores five years prior.

In addition to Korean skincare simply being ahead of its time, the Korean approach to skincare takes on preventative measures instead of the American method of covering up the skin’s blemishes. Not to mention the all-natural appeal that Korean brands bring by implementing ingredients such as snail, placenta, chia seeds and volcanic clay into their products.

 

Photo courtesy of http://agathblog.blogspot.com

Photo courtesy of http://agathblog.blogspot.com

 

If you want to find out what the hype is all about, there is The Face Shop, Laneige, Etude House and Innisfree to name a few. Let us know if they work for you!

 

Feature photo courtesy of jp1958

Can The Korean Matching Trend Work For Couples in America?

 

By now, we all know about the popular Korean trend known as the “couple look.” To achieve the look, a couple coordinates their outfits with the same color, shirt, shoes. They can even go to extreme lengths and match head-to-toe in identical his-and-hers versions of an entire outfit.

Many couples have said they do this in an effort to show affection. Others say it helps as a clear sign for strangers to know they are off the market. Some even claim that they simply do it for fashion since it is so attention grabbing.

Whatever the reason may be, the matching trend has clearly been a hit for Korean couples. So what about American couples? It’s certainly not uncommon to see couples in the same color, but what about entire matching outfits?

Luckily for us, we don’t need to wonder. Refinery21 writer, Connie Wang, decided to go ahead and use this trend for her social experiment to see how it would play out for a couple in America.

match 1 match 2

“It’s hard for me to get embarrassed about what I wear,” Wang wrote. “However, upon receiving this assignment to test-run one of the most prevalent fashion trends in Korea, I broke into a cold, miserable sweat. When I told my boyfriend he’d be roped into it, too, he turned a similar shade of gray.”

The couple went through an entire week of matching and documenting their experience. On the first day, they admitted that the process of picking the outfit and getting ready was quite fun, but as soon as they stepped outside, things changed.

“Immediately after we left the apartment, I felt more self-conscious about my outfit than I’ve ever felt in my life,” she recalled. “It was like a joke, and like we were in costume instead of in clothes, and I wanted to hide.”

match 3 match 4

 

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The next few days remained uncomfortable for the two. In fact, Wang’s boyfriend had a tendency to keep away from her in public to avoid the discomfort. The couple did prove one thing though. Some Korean couples claim that they matched to make sure others are aware of their taken status. That also seems to be the case in America.

“Note to all women who want to avoid being hit on: Dress up in the exact same outfit as one of your male friends. It’s like wearing a wedding ring on your entire body.”

Eventually the couple became a little bit more accepting of the idea, but “not so bad after all” isn’t exactly the best response you can get. There were various emotions involved. Wang’s boyfriend felt emasculated while Wang herself felt the need to put on lipstick to appear more feminine than the man sitting next to her. Oddly enough, the couple eventually stopped noticing.

“I can’t say I liked it,” Wangs boyfriend said on the very last day of the experiment. “But now I get it.”

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All photos courtesy of Refinery29.

 

Korean Model and Actress Clara Lee Named Second Most Beautiful Woman in The World by “MODE Magazine”

 

South Korean model and actress Clara Lee was listed as the second most beautiful woman in the world on Oct. 28 by MODE Lifestyle Magazine.

Following American actress/model Tania Marie Caringi, Clara took second place on the magazine’s “100 Most Beautiful Women in the World 2014″ list. Meanwhile, German model Cristina Maria Saracut ranked third.

Aside from the top three, the list included Hollywood actresses Jessica Alba and Scarlett Johansson, Brazilian Victoria’s Secret model Alessandra Ambrosio, South African model Candice Swanepoel and American singer Beyonce.

According to MODE, Clara is the magazine’s first Asian cover model. “[Clara] has a refreshing image and bright personality. Her stellar performances in Korean movies, modeling and acting caught the attention of our U.S. judges, which led to her high ranking on the list,” said a magazine representative.

In response to the impressive title, Clara commented, “I’m grateful that people not only in Korea but also overseas are looking at me prettily with a good heart.  I want to make sure to relay my thanks to my fans both domestic and foreign through this opportunity.”

She also tweeted photos from the magazine.  

 

The 28-year-old celebrity comes from a unique background. Although she was born in Switzerland and educated in the U.S., she holds British citizenship. She starred in her first movie, Five Senses of Eros, in 2009 and skyrocketed into fame after throwing a ceremonial first pitch in a Korean professional baseball game in form-fitting leggings.

Photo courtesy of NEWSis

Photo courtesy of NEWSis

Clara has also appeared in numerous music videos, such as Jay Park’s “Joah” and Tei’s “Same Pillow.” She currently has more than half a million followers on her Facebook page.

You can view MODE’s “100 Most Beautiful Women in the World 2014″ list here.

 

–STORY BY REERA YOO 
This story was originally published in iamkoream.com

 

Meet the Designer: Moon Young Hee

 

 

During Paris Fashion Week Womenswear Spring/Summer 2015, Korean designer Moon Young Hee’s collection turned heads.

Moon Young Hee is known for manifesting Korean ideas in a modern form. This desing technique can be seen in her massive collection which shows an impressive amount of detail, mainly using monochromatic toned designs embedded with various patterns and textures. Her sophisticated design has sought to show the potential of materials being used and maximizes the elegant atmosphere.

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Even at an early age, it seemed Moon was destined for this career. Growing up, while other children played with toys, Moon was taken with needlework. Since then, she followed her dreams of becoming a designer and chose to study French literature in college since costume designing departments did not exist at her school back then.

Moon settled in Paris in 1996 to seek some challenge in a bigger world. What started as a curious adventure turned out to be much more difficult than what she had imagined, but that didn’t stop her from moving forward.

Showing hard work and dedication, she studied day and night at the library located nearby her atelier and studied early 20th century French fashion, which later inspired her to graft her own style using traditional Western designs.

Though Moon is recognized as a prominent designer today, she is known to live a very humble life. Not only does she prepare her lunch box on her own, but she also chooses to wear shoes that have been worn for more than ten years.

It is clear that Moon designs out of love and a passion for the art as opposed to commercial success. For the fashion shows, she dedicates her heart, soul and mind to work together to bring out the best in her collection. Her work demonstrates a pursuit of perfection and keeps an eye on every little detail. Needless to say, this pays off during the catwalk.

 

–STORY BY MICHELLE KIM
Photos courtesy of www.queenafashionstyle.com

 

Steven Yeun On How Korean Parents React To A Career In Acting

 

Steven Yeun recently went on Ellen as a first-time guest to promote the return of The Walking Dead. During his interview, he talked about his parents as well as the blood poisoning injury he received on set.

After Yeun admitted that The Walking Dead was his second audition ever in L.A., Ellen asked the Korean American actor if his parents approved of his decision to pursue acting as a career.

“No, my parents are Korean, and traditionally, that first generation of Korean Americans aren’t too happy with the little curveball that you throw them when you’re a kid,” said Yeun. Although his parents weren’t happy with his decision at first, Yeun told Ellen that they were now proud of him as an actor and would even give him advice about the entertainment industry.

“My dad wanted me to wear a suit everywhere I went,” Yeun said, adding that his father would tell him to wear a suit, even when he would go out to buy oranges. “He’s like, ‘You should get a suit … what if they get you and then you’re not in a suit? Then you look stupid.’”

 

Later in the interview, Yeun talked about how he got blood poisoning after performing a stunt where he falls and lands on his arm. When his arm started to bleed, he wiped off the blood and thought nothing of it until his arm swelled the next morning. As a result, he had to get a steroid shot and an antibiotic shot in the buttocks.

“And the nurse, she said I had a very taut tushy. I’ve been doing squats,” Yeun said.

“What a wonderful compliment,” Ellen responded. “I love when they compliment your butt right before they put a shot inside of you.”

The Walking Dead‘s fifth season will premiere October 12 on AMC.

 

–STORY BY REERA YOO
This story was originally published on iamkoream.com 

 

Must-Read of The Week: “The Birth of Korean Cool” by Euny Hong

 

Looking for a good read? We have just the thing. Find out what page-turner you should pick up with our Must-Reads of The Week!

There was a time when my American classmates would ask where I was from — Japan? China? When I answered “Korea,” they’d get a blank look on their face and say, “Crayon? Where’s that?” Today, from K-pop and Korean barbecue to Samsung and Hyundai, you can’t not know about Korea. And in Euny Hong’s new book, The Birth of Korean Cool: How One Nation Is Conquering the World Through Pop Culture, I’m getting a crystallized version of my life as a Korean in America — from absolute obscurity to hailing from just about the trendiest place on the planet.

After spending her childhood in Chicago’s suburbs, Hong, at the age of 12, moved with her family back to Seoul’s tony Gangnam neighborhood (yes, that Gangnam; in fact, Hong’s parents went to the same school as Psy’s). In 1985, Korea was still a developing country with regular brownouts, reused vaccination needles and squat toilets. (I remember when I visited Korea in the mid-’80s, I had to bring used clothing and loads of Sanka for my relatives because coffee was difficult to get there; today, Seoul has the most number of Starbucks in the world.) Through an interesting and often funny analysis of corporal punishment in Korean schools, Confucian ideals, that very Korean concept of han and the birth of irony (epitomized by Psy’s hit song), Hong makes the case for a perfect storm of circumstances — along with not an insignificant boost from the government — that eventually led to Korea’s rise as a worldwide “soft power.”

Details: Paper, $16, picadorusa.com, eunyhong.com.

 

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This story was originally published in our Fall 2014 issue. Get your copy here.