Jackie Chan Portrait Made Entirely of Chopsticks

A few months ago, we showed you the art of Red Hong Yi. Referred to as the artist who “loves to paint, but not with a paintbrush,” Hong Yi utilized make up to recreated scenes from Chinese myths and create cultural and traditional symbols of the country such as opera masks, firecrackers, cherry blossom trees and goldfish.

Luckily for us, Hong Yi continues to use unique mediums for her work. She has made portraits out of flower petals, sunflower seeds, candle wax, bamboo sticks and coffee cup stains. She’s even painted an entire portrait using a basketball as a brush.

Most recently, Hong Yi has payed homage to actor, action choreographer, comedian, director, producer, martial artist, screenwriter, entrepreneur, singer, and stunt performer, Jackie Chan.

In addition to managing his first K-Pop band, JJCC, Chan is also celebrating his 60th birthday this year. In honor of this, Red Hong Yi decided to create a portrait of him. Of course, this isn’t just an ordinary portrait. It’s created with 64,000 chopsticks.

In the video description, Hong Yi writes, “Jackie turns 60 this year and being an artist who paints without a paintbrush, I spent a looong time thinking about what material to use for his portrait! He is an actor, a martial arts master, an environmentalist and is a world-renowned face! I finally decided on chopsticks – a symbol of the Chinese culture, Jackie has used chopsticks during his kungfu scenes in a few movies like the Fearless Hyena and Karate Kid. I used disposable bamboo chopsticks to show that disposable materials can be reused and made into something else more meaningful and beautiful. I spent a month collecting these chopsticks from cafes, stalls and factories in Zhejiang and Beijing, then tying each of them up. So honoured to present it at his concert on 6/4/14. Happy 60th birthday, Jackie!”

 

 

First Look at Jackie Chan’s K-pop Boy Band JJCC

Everyone was in disbelief when it was announced that the Chinese action movie star, Jackie Chan, was trading stunts for management, starting with K-pop boy band JJCC.

However, Chan seems to have things perfectly under control. “Jackie Chan has always been overflowing with good words about K-Pop – after he saw K-Pop’s unlimited potential and possibility for development, he spent several years grooming JJCC,” reported Chinese media outlet Xinhua. They added that “[JJCC's] appearance is very handsome, and they’ve received individual training on their personality and stunts.”

Furthermore, Chan has been quite familiar with the Chinese music industry. In America, many of us are only aware of his action movie skills, but the 59-year-old studied at the Peking Opera School and has released more than 25 Canto-pop and Mando-pop albums.

It’s no wonder that audiences have been anticipating the debut of JJCC for months. Now that it’s here, no one seems to be disappointed.

JJCC consists of 4 Korean members SimBa, E.co, EDDY, San-Cheong, and Chinese-Australian Prince Mak who are all in their early twenties. JJCC’s agency has stated, “All of the five members possess skills in rapping, singing, songwriting, and of course, musicality, as well as dancing skills in popping, jazz, b-boying, and ballet for various performances. The group can speak three languages including English, Korean, and Chinese… The five members created a synergy effect with their different colors. We ask that you show a lot of interest and anticipation for the five gems who will represent Asia.”

On March 20, JJCC made its live debut on K-pop music chart program “M COUNTDOWN.” A few days later they released their debut single “At First.” Unfortunately, one of their members, Prince Mak, is not featured in the music video due to an alleged illness during the filming of the video.

Check out their music video and well as their live performance below.

 

 

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Why You Should Follow Jackie Chan on Facebook

Some celebrity Facebook pages are fan-made; others are run by their managers or agents. But international martial arts choreographer, director and actor Jackie Chan is one of the celebrities who frequently updates his Facebook page himself (though every once in a while one of his people will take over).

Sometimes he’ll advertise for a movie of his or a special event he’s hosting, but most of the time, Jackie likes to upload photos taken over the span of his career –– and his personal captions are nothing short of hilarious.

As if you need another reason to follow this legendary renaissance man –– not only is Jackie a trained martial artist and actor, he also directs, produces and writes his own movies –– here are a few of our favorite photos with captions he’s posted:

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“Call me maybe.”

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“#YOLO”

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“When I read I put on my thinking cap!”

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“I have always had a great sense of style!”

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“My younger years. No more mesh shirts for me!!”

Jackie Chan’s “Chinese Zodiac” Premieres in The U.S.

Story by Taylor Weik.

Audrey Magazine got up close and personal with the legendary Jackie Chan and actress Yao Xingtong to discuss the U.S. premiere of Chan’s award-winning film, Chinese Zodiac

After almost 10 months since its Hong Kong release, CZ12, also known as Chinese Zodiac, international superstar Jackie Chan’s newest –– and last –– big action movie as a director, was released in select AMC American and Canadian theaters October 18.

Filmed on location across five continents and seven countries, CZ12 takes audiences on a global adventure as Chan’s “JC,” a modern day treasure hunter, is hired by a group of antique dealers to track down six bronze sculptures that are missing from the original set of 12 representing the animals of the Chinese Zodiac. With the help of his team of explorers, a Chinese artifact student and a French heiress, JC races through French vineyards and braves the jungles of the South Seas in search of forgotten relics.

With a diverse number of locations comes a diverse cast, a casting decision that Chan owes to his many years of observation in the entertainment industry.

“I wanted to show the whole world that good guys and bad guys can be of any race,” Chan explains. He specifically mentions a band of pirates that shows up to sabotage one of JC’s missions. “If you notice, I cast a black guy, a Filipino guy, a Japanese guy, and so on. In Hollywood movies, the bad guys are always black. I always thought to myself, ‘Why are they always black?’ They’re not.”

The action-packed film is one of Chan’s most ambitious to date. Not only did Chan spend a hefty amount of money producing the film –– one of the major fight scenes cost more than $10 million to shoot –– but he also broke two Guinness World Records during the process for “Most Stunts Performed by a Living Actor” and “Most Credits in One Movie,” the latter of which includes 15 credits, among them Actor, Director, Producer, Co-Writer and Fight Choreographer.

Chan owes his ever-expanding list of credits to his developing urge for creative license. As Chan began to make more movies over the span of his 50-year career, directors began to allow him to choreograph fight scenes and even add comedy to the scripts. Eventually, he wanted to do it all.

“I spent six years writing the script [for CZ12] while I was in America,” Chan says. “During Rush Hour 3, during The Forbidden Kingdom, any time I had a break, I’d be sitting there writing my script. Fighting is always good, but I wanted to make people laugh.”

CZ12’s cast brings in numerous actors, from American actor Oliver Platt to a cameo appearance by Chan’s own wife, Joan Lin. Yao Xingtong, the 2009 nominee for Best Actress in China’s Golden Rooster Awards for her role in Blossom, plays Coco, a bright Chinese student and passionate activist who fights to return stolen cultural treasures to their countries of origin.

“It’s been very fun,” Xingtong says of the time she spent filming with the cast and crew. “Jackie worked hard and took care of all of us. In China, we all like to call him ‘Big Brother.’”

Since its release, CZ12 has earned over $160 million worldwide, making it the highest grossing action film and second highest grossing Chinese film of all time in China. It has also won Best Action Choreography at the 32nd Hong Kong Film Awards.

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