How School Lunch in America Compares to Japan, Philippines, India and Korea

 

Yesterday, Buzzfeed released a video called “School Lunches Around The World” which (as the title suggests) shows the average school lunch of children from various countries.  Most interesting of all was the difference in size, nutritional value and of course, content.

Screen Shot 2014-10-08 at 4.25.31 PMAccording to the video, a typical school lunch in the United States consists of a peanut butter and jelly sandwich, some chips, a Go-gurt, an apple and some milk. Although many comments argued that a more typical American school lunch consists of a slice of pizza instead of a PB&J, we have to admit that this combination pretty much hits the mark when it comes to average lunches.

 

But does the video accurately show the average school lunch in Asian countries?

 

  Screen Shot 2014-10-08 at 4.37.59 PMAlthough the image shows Japan’s lunch consisting of rice, mackerel and pickled spinach, it’s safe to assume that the vegetables and fish can be substituted with other ingredients. The main essence of a Japanese lunch is clear: food is made from scratch and made to be healthy. In fact, Japan’s child obesity rate, which is always among the world’s lowest, has declined for each of the past six years.        

 

Screen Shot 2014-10-08 at 4.49.14 PMFor the Philippines, the video shows rice and lechon kawali (pork) on a banana leaf rather than a plate. Admittedly, the banana leaf gave quite a few people a chuckle. Viewers recognized this as the tradition in many rural areas of the Philippines. The main issue some had with this image is that it did not feature seafood, a staple of Philippine cuisine. That aside, this simple combination is more than common. Unfortunately, a diet rich in meats like Lechon may be the reason for high rates of hypertension.          

 

 

Screen Shot 2014-10-08 at 5.13.50 PMIndia’s school lunch consists of rice and saag paneer (a classic Indian dish consisting of cooked spinach and fried paneer cheese with thickened cream or coconut milk) and dal makhani (another Indian staple consisting of whole black lentil and red kidney beans). The meal has become an average school lunch thanks to a massive school feeding program which aims to improve nutritional levels among children.          

 

 

  Screen Shot 2014-10-09 at 1.55.19 PM Korea’s average school lunch consists of purple rice, soup, kimchi, radish and bulgogi (grilled, marinated beef). While some viewers commented that this plate is inaccurate because it should be flipped to have the rice closer to us, we can go ahead and agree with the plate. Anyone who has dined at a Korean restaurant is accustomed to the colorful meal and the numerous side dishes.  

As viewers watched this video, they couldn’t help but notice that the American meal lacked vegetables and more importantly, it contained quite a large amount of processed and sugary foods. Many have linked this to the high obesity rates in the U.S. which have more than doubled in adults and children since the 1970’s.    

 

Check out more school lunches with the complete video below.

The World’s Smallest Woman Achieves Her Biggest Dream on “American Horror Story: Freak Show”

 

Tonight’s the night! The highly anticipated fourth season of FX television series American Horror Story premieres tonight and has fans on the edge of their seats in excitement.

As the name suggests, American Horror Story: Freak Show is is set in 1952 Jupiter, Florida and tells the story of a traveling freak show in America. There’s no denying our excitement for the expected suspense and horror (after all, there is a mysterious murderer in town), but truth be told, we’re more excited for something else.

AHS is including many actors from their usual cast, but in an effort to achieve authenticity, AHS went above and beyond to search for actors who may have actually been qualified for this type of show back when exhibitions of human oddities existed. This means AHS has opened their doors up and created opportunities for actors who have doubted their chances of ever being on screen because of their size, disability, etc.

Based on the numerous interviews with the AHS actors, many seem ecstatic about the opportunity. These actors finally get to show their talent in an industry that is not as accepting as many of us would like.

In particular, we’re excited to see 20-year-old Jyoti Amge from Nagpur, India. With a height of 23 inches and a weight of 11 pounds, Amge currently holds the Guinness World Record for the shortest woman.

“People like me might be small in stature, but can also act,” she says in an exclusive American Horror Story interview. “Regular people should not underestimate people who are small. In every aspect [we] can do things that normal people can.”

And Amge certainly proves that by achieving her biggest dream. When AHS producers checked out her official website, Amge openly stated that she wanted to move to Hollywood and become an actress.

Fulfilling that dream, Jyoti Amge plays the character Ma Petite, an assistant to the head of the freak show. Although Amge’s character is part of the freak show, she points out that an important message is to be learned from this: People who are different are not “freaks” and should not scare you.

Check out the American Horror Story: Freak Show interview below. Amge talks about everything from marriage, her pet peeves and of course, the must-see show.

 

 

14-0510_EDU_Multicultural_Parent_Banner_HS_AudreyMag_BD1

Newspaper Angers Bollywood’s Deepika Padukone With A Tweet About Her Cleavage

 

The beloved Bollywood actress Deepika Padukone was quite the topic of discussion this past weekend. Unfortunately, the attention was not because of her highly anticipated, English-language comedy Finding Fanny, which opened in the U.S. this past Friday. Instead it was about something completely unrelated: her cleavage.

It all began this past Sunday when the Times of India, a leading Indian newspaper, tweeted a photo taken of Padukone with the caption “OMG: Deepika Padukone’s cleavage show!” This was followed by a link to a slideshow of more pictures of the 28-year-old actress.

 

 

Screen Shot 2014-09-16 at 3.02.31 PM

 

 

Now if the Times of India thought Padukone was simply going to ignore the tweet, they were very, very mistaken. Padukone wasted no time calling out the newspaper by discussing it’s content and lack of respect for women.

 

 

14MKT_IW_300x250

 

The Times of India responded to the actress by insisting that they only meant to compliment her. They tweeted at her saying, “You look so great that we want to make sure everyone knew! :)”

In return, this fueled the anger of her fans who pointed out that when men catcall and objectify women, it’s not a compliment. Fans were so riled up that the hashtag #IStandWithDeepikaPadukone was trending in India. A number of other stars stood with Padukone and applauded her for speaking up. Among them was Audrey cover girl, Priyanka Chopra.     

 

 

After much controversy, the Times of India has taken down the tweet as well as the tweets related to it.

 

 


Why You NEED To See “Finding Fanny” This Weekend (Plus An Interview With Film’s Star Deepika Padukone)

 

Superstar actress Deepika Padukone (a member of the Bollywood 100 Crore Club a record-breaking four times last year) stars in the highly anticipated, English-language comedy Finding Fanny this fall. (The trailer alone has more than 3 million hits on YouTube; it hit the 1 million mark in a day.)

In the lazy tropical countryside of the Indian state of Goa, Padukone is a young virgin widow, bored with her mundane existence in the sleepy village. When the old local postman (Naseeruddin Shah) discovers a marriage proposal he had written 46 years ago mysteriously returned to him, never delivered, he is shocked and sets out to find out what happened to Stefanie “Fanny” Fernandes.

Under varying pretexts, he is joined by Padukone, the local (and bitter) mechanic, a belligerent artist and an obnoxious snob. What the dysfunctional characters do find on their journey is friendship and even love. The all-star cast includes Arjun Kapoor, Dimple Kapadia and Pankaj Kapoor, with a special appearance by Ranveer Singh.

Details FINDING FANNY opens across US/Canada this Friday, SEPTEMBER 12

 

 INTERVIEW WITH FINDING FANNY STAR DEEPIKA PADUKONE:

Q: From commercial success to doing a quirky comedy like Finding Fanny, what kind of cinema excites Deepika?
A: I love commercial cinema. But I also get a rush from doing clutter-breaking stuff like Finding Fanny.

Q: You are at the peak of your career with hits after hits. What made you do an off-the-wall film like Finding Fanny?
A: A lot of people told me it’s a risk. I did not think of it as a risk, but a brave move on my part to do it. I went with my instinct. What my heart said. I trust Homi (Adajania) and his vision.

Q: But what drew you to the film?
A: For me, the story of a film comes first and character next. I was looking to do something different and I am glad I did this film. As we work in a Hindi language film, we are used to it. But when you do an English language film it is a different experience and it takes time to get into this space. The challenge was to perform in English language.

Q: You have a Konkani connection in the film. Talk to us about it.
A: As far as the accent of Finding Fanny is concerned, it’s actually something I enjoyed because I got to speak my mother tongue, Konkani, a little bit in some scenes. The film is set in Goa and Goans usually speak Konkani. I got to experiment and improvise. But most importantly it’s a nice feeling when you have command over a language. Having said that, the first few days were very difficult on the sets not just for me but also for the entire team.

Q: You are working with Dimple Kapadia again post Cocktail and as reported you adore her. Talk to us about your equation with her.
A: What I feel for Dimple-ji and my equation with her, I can’t describe it in words. She took me for lunch and shopping while we were shooting for Cocktail. She pampers me and spoils me. She treats me like her daughter.

Q: How would you describe the film Finding Fanny?
A: It’s a different film. I found it to be different. It’s refreshing, it’s quirky and cool!

 

Screen Shot 2014-09-09 at 11.17.12 AM

14-0510_EDU_Multicultural_Parent_Banner_HS_AudreyMag_BD1
Screen Shot 2014-09-09 at 11.17.23 AM Screen Shot 2014-09-09 at 11.17.31 AM

 

 

Local theaters, ticketing, and showtimes will be posted on Wednesday at:

http://www.fandango.com/findingfanny_175019/movieoverview

http://www.movietickets.com/movie/mid/182500

For more information, visit the official website.

 

Finding Fanny was featured in our Fall 2014 issue. Get your copy here.

 

Film Shows The Dark Truth Behind Indian Brothels and Human Trafficking

 

“They took me to the hotel and even though I said no, they forcefully raped me, ” said one anonymous victim of human trafficking, her voice heavy with emotion. “In the morning I had no clothes on my body. I didn’t know what had happened, I was insensible. I felt very uncomfortable, blood was coming out. It was really difficult.”

Unfortunately, this vicious experience was endured by many of the woman who chose to tell their story for the documentary “Stolen Innocence.” Casey Allred, an American educator in India, and film director Chris Davis are the two behind this important project which all began in 2011.

Allred had opened a school in India and it was there that he noticed a peculiar trend: the girls were disappearing. Even when Allred and other teachers when to the homes of the missing girls to investigate, many were no where to be found and the citizens were reluctant to go into detail about the girls’ whereabouts.

14-0510_EDU_Multicultural_Parent_Banner_HS_AudreyMag_BD1

“I will never forget the day that I learned the truth,” Allred said. “I spoke with a local attorney who told me that he had parents coming to his office every day looking for their lost daughters. He then told me that these girls were being trafficked into the sex trade.”

Shocked by all this, Allred joined forced with Davis and went undercover to red light districts and brothels throughout India, Nepal and Bangladesh to interview the sex workers. They have created a Kickstarter in hopes of raising funds to complete filming so that they can show the world the truth behind these brothels.

Check out the preview below.

 

 

 

Kiosk Disguised As An ATM Machine Helps Indian Women Report Rape Without Fear

 

There have been countless efforts to try and decrease rape cases in India where terrifying studies show that a woman is raped every 30 minutes. Although all these efforts (such as as anti-rape clothing) try hard to change things, rape continues to be a very serious and prominent issue in India.

Although much focus has been on rape prevention, what about those who have already fallen victim to this unforgivable act? Apparently, they face a whole new layer of difficulties when they try to seek justice.

According to Think Progress, a 16-year-old girl in Calcutta reported a gang-rape to the police. As punishment, the men raped her again and burned her alive. It’s very likely that many women do not report rape out of fear. After all, these death threats are apparently quite common.

 

 

“Women were being denied a fundamental right because of this fear of going to the police. Why should they need someone’s help to do something so basic?” said Joydeep Nayak, a senior member of the police force in India.

Nayak decided to create an alternative to going to the police station. Her solution? She created an electronic kiosk that allows women to discreetly report abuse without fear of backlash. The “Instant Complaint Logging Internet Kiosk,” or “iClik,” resembles an ATM Machine and has been installed in a bank in Bhubaneswar.

Nayak has even addressed the illiteracy issue in India.  For those who are unable to write out a report, the kiosk also records audio reports and scans written complaints.

“My dream is to have a kiosk alongside existing ATMs, in schools, railway stations and bus stations, all over the country — so that women can walk in, complain and leave without any escort or hassles,” Nayak said.

So far, about eight to ten women use the machine every day.

 

 

Rice Tales: Indian Journalist Tweaks Ice Bucket Challenge To Fit ‘Indian Needs’

 

The ALS Ice Bucket Challenge that has flooded social media platforms for the past couple of weeks has, despite its charitable cause, stirred up controversy about excess and unnecessary waste of water. Some critics chastise Californians and point to the serious drought the state is currently facing, and others find fault with the participants’ lack of precaution and consideration for those living in conditions where water is dirty and scarce.

Without badmouthing the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge, a journalist from Hyperabad, India decided to slightly tweak the original challenge into an “Indian version for Indian needs.” Instead of using ice, the latest Rice Bucket Challenge calls for participants to fill a bucket with rice and give it to those who are needy, raising awareness of hunger and scarcity of resources in India.

The challenge gets rid of the option to opt out of donating by pouring ice water on your head, and instead, ensures that the challenge focuses on the cause: helping those in need.

10653463_260801067452537_5736186497950098049_n

 

The Rice Bucket Challenge Facebook page, which only launched a couple of days ago, has already garnered over 44,000 likes. The new-and-improved challenge was started by journalist (and, appropriately, an employee for a global rice research website) Manju Latha Kalanidhi, who is astounded at the wave the challenge has created, from India to the United States.

“It has a small incentive–post a photo and get liked…but from Sweden, from Australia, from America, people came up with their own little versions,” said Kalanidhi. “I sat up the whole night. Amazing to see the shares and the likes…It is like a social media tsunami. Exponential. It goes one, four sixteen…”

10563054_258008494398461_6373133639275119314_n

This could potentially spark a movement of “rice bucket challenges” all over the world, helping the needy in poverty-stricken areas of China to the unfortunate living on Skid Row in Downtown Los Angeles. However, it is important to keep in mind that these social media-crazed, hashtagged challenges should not be a platform for participants to highlight their own act of generosity, but instead an opportunity to contribute individual efforts into a larger, worldwide movement for improving the lives of the less fortunate.

[Photos credited to: Rice Bucket Challenge Facebook page]

 

Indian Acid Attack Victims Come Together For An Incredibly Inspiring Photo Shoot

 

Most of us can barely fathom what many innocent Indian women have had to suffer as victims of rape in a country where it happens so frequently that it has become the second most dangerous place to live in for women.

Another issue in India, one much less commonly addressed, is the approximately 1,000 women who are attacked with acid every year. In most cases, while the victims of the attacks do not die, they are forced to live with the memories of the attack, along with the disfiguring scars, for the rest of their lives. As cruel and inhumane as the heinous crime is, however, there are unfortunately no specific laws against acid attacks within the Indian judicial system.

Twenty-two-year-old Rupa is one of these victims. In 2008, Rupa’s stepmother and four men attacked her with acid while she was sleeping. The resulting scars were so extensive it became a hindrance when she tried to apply for jobs. Of course, she was discouraged at first, but she didn’t let her scars get to her. In fact, she joined the charity campaign group Stop Acid Attacks and has been working with other survivors of acid attack the last few years.

And she didn’t just stop there. Rupa, who has always had a lifelong dream of designing clothes, recently launched her own clothing line called Rupa Designs. With the help of Indian photographer Rahul Saharan, Rupa even modeled the clothes from the line in a gorgeous photo shoot, along with four of her friends — Rita, Sonam, Laxmi and Chanchal — all of whom are also acid attack survivors.

 

photo1

photo2

 

 

photo3

 

Saharan, who shot the photos of the women for free, has stated that these photos are “a tribute to all the brave women across the globe who have gone through this gruesome torture.” He is now working on a photo exhibition, the proceeds from which will go to help survivors.

I have been associated with Chhaon (meeting house for suvivors) for the last two-and-a-half years, but this is the first time I feel like I’ve put my skills to good use to help these lovely girls,” he said in an interview. “I feel blessed to have got this exclusive opportunity.”

Photos courtesy of New York Daily News.

 

Watch This Video of Indian Men Apologizing to Women For Rape

 

Just recently, a rape-themed photo shoot directed by Indian photographer Raj Shetye was brought to our attention. Like many of us here at Audrey, social media users all over the world burst into fits of rage and tweeted their disgust of Shetye and his severe lack of judgment.

Shetye claimed that he meant to send a message to women that rape can happen everywhere through his photo shoot. While we appreciate bringing the issue of rape to light, we definitely believe that is not the way to do it.

 

 

A couple of Indian men from the East India Comedy Group, however, got their message right. They issued a heartfelt apology through a video entitled “I’m Not A Woman” to Indian women, acknowledging that women are being wrongfully abused, raped and belittled in their country. We realize this is not going to fix anything overnight, but it is definitely a step in the right direction.

“Why should you ever need apologize to anyone for being yourself? I am sorry,” they say in the video. We couldn’t agree more.

Watch the video below:

 

 

Indian Rape-Themed Fashion Photo Shoot Sparks Major Controversy

 

Let the record show that here at Audrey, we have no problem with creative editorial fashion shoots that showcase photographers and designers who think outside the box. We do however, have a major issue with offensive photo shoots that depict the scenes of a real-life gang rape incident that occurred in New Delhi, India, in 2012, where a 23-year-old woman was brutally raped, tortured and murdered on board a bus home.

This pretty much goes without saying, but it’s just an incredibly insensitive idea to have a rape-themed photo shoot in a country where 93 women are raped every single day. In fact, rape happens so frequently there that Indian women have created anti-rape clothing to protect themselves. Clearly, this is still very much an ongoing problem that has yet to be resolved.

Mumbai-based photographer Raj Shetye, the man responsible for the controversial photos series titled “The Wrong Turn,” claims that the photo shoot was not an act of glamorizing the “Nirbhaya” case  (Hindi word for “fearless,” a nickname given to the 23-year-old victim to protect her identity), but rather as a way to raise awareness for the safety of women in India.

“The message I would like to give is that it doesn’t matter who the girl is,” Shetye defended himself in an interview with Buzzfeed. “It doesn’t depend on which class she belonged in — it can happen to anyone.”

 

i

embed-3

 

 

shoe

wtf

 

I don’t know if you see what I see, but those photos seem to be an exact, literal representation of glamorizing a truly horrific event.

What do you think? Are you as outraged as we are?

Photos courtesy of Refinery29.