Move Over, Barbie: Lego Debuts Its First Female Scientist

We can all let out a collective cheer for one of the newest additions to the Lego family. Professor C. Bodin, according to her name tag, is Lego’s first female scientist. The best part? The model is simply labeled “Scientist” as opposed to “Female Scientist” or “Girl Scientist,” and does not pander to gender stereotypes by, say, making her pink.

This is certainly a step forward for Lego, which has been criticized for focusing too much on their male customers. The sex-ratio for the minifigure models is 4:1 in favor of males, and female minifigures tend to cater to gender stereotypes. (Their “Friends” minifigures are more shapely and have stereotypical “feminine colors and storylines.”)

Though Professor C. Bodin may be the first female scientist in the Lego universe, according to Scientific American, she is not the first female minifigure with a career in science, technology, engineering or math. Lego released a doctor (complete with pigtails) in the 1970s, as well as a female astronaut in the 1990s as a part of its Ice Planet 2002 series.

With Professor C. Bodin, Lego seems to be taking a small step in the right direction. In the meantime, we can look to others who are fighting to ensure equality in children’s toys.

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Japanese Female Bosses Are Cool (According to this Survey)

Ever wonder what are some of the big differences between male and female bosses? Well Japan sure did. A survey for Japan Labor Policy and Training discovered the following-

In companies containing over 300 employees:
97.1% of female bosses believe assessment of employee performance  has nothing to do with gender.
72.7% of male bosses believe assessment of employee performance  has nothing to do with gender.

In companies containing 100-299 employees:
93.6% of females bosses believe assessment of employee performance  has nothing to do with gender.
53.5 % of male bosses believe assessment of employee performance  has nothing to do with gender.

On assigning business trips and overtime duties:
72.2% of female supervisors make no distinction based on gender.
53.5% of male supervisors make no distinction based on gender.

 

Clearly the female population of Japanese bosses seem more intent on equality in the workplace. Is this the same case for us?
Read the original article here.