Chinese Cancer Patient Makes 1,000 Dolls to Raise Money For Hospital Bill

 

Medical bills these days can go through the roof — especially for local Chinese citizens who do not necessarily have the funds to pay for insurance.

When 26-year-old Zhou Jie was diagnosed with colon cancer, she turned to her family members, who emptied out all their savings in order to help relieve some of the costs. The treatment however, came at too high a price. Even with the aid of her family, she could not meet what the bills demanded.

It’s easy to throw your hands up and surrender when facing debt, and even more so with death — but the Suzhou native didn’t give up. Instead, she made 1,000 dolls and sold them online to raise money, to cover the costs of her illness.

doll

 

 

In no time at all, her story went viral, and Chinese citizens began reaching out to her with words of encouragement — along with their purchases of the dolls. The dolls were priced between 38 – 98 rmb (roughly $6 – $16 USD).

On June 30th, Zhou Jie, dubbed the “doll girl,” passed away peacefully. Her family had told China Times that she had no regrets, knowing that she had the support and love of her family, friends and complete strangers, whom all helped made her dream of raising money, come true.

Why Asian Barbie Dolls Are Important

When I was a little girl, I had a lot of dolls. I mean a lot of dolls. There were Barbie dolls cluttering my toy box, Cabbage Patch dolls lining my window sill and Ragdolls taking up most of my bed.

Despite my ever-growing collection, I noticed there was one doll in particular that I favored above the rest. She was the one doll that went on family vacations with me, accompanied me to the dinner table and was the only one in my arms for nap time.

As a child, I couldn’t figure out why I played favorites with her. Now as an adult, the answer is obvious: she was my only Asian doll. I quickly realized it wasn’t favoritism at all. It was my natural craving to find anything that looked like me in a toybox filled with blond hair and blue eyes. It was the craving to know that the way I looked was “pretty enough” to be created into a doll. It was the craving to know that it was okay to look different.

This is probably why there is quite some sadness over the recent news of American Girl discontinuing their only Asian American doll. Our community has lost an already rare opportunity for our little ones to see their culture and experiences reflected in mainstream/popular culture.

Luckily for us, in the midst of this bad news, we discovered something incredible. While looking for alternate Asian dolls that our little ones could have instead of an American Girl doll, we uncovered something even better.

As it turns out, Barbie, the world’s most popular series of dolls, saw the necessity in having diversity among their dolls. We found everything from Korean and Filipino Barbies to Japanese Kens.

Now don’t get us wrong. We’re aware of the various problems that come along with the Barbie franchise and we certainly don’t want our children facing unrealistic expectations to be thin, but having Asians portrayed in such a mainstream fashion is clearly a win for us. Imagine children going home with these and gaining a curiosity for the cultural significance of their Barbie’s dress or headpiece or jewelry. Imagine children having dolls that make them proud of their ethnic makeup.

Unfortunately, many of these very limited-edition dolls are no longer available from Mattel and are probably in the hands of hardcore doll collectors. Maybe if we cross our fingers enough, we can get these Barbies back? We could certainly use them.

barbie 1

Philippines Barbie® Doll

barbie 2

China Barbie® Doll

barbie 3

India Barbie® Doll

barbie 4

Japan Ken® Doll

barbie 5

Japan Barbie® Doll

barbie 6

Japan Barbie® Doll

barbie 7

Happy New Year™ Barbie® Doll

barbie 8

Sumatra-Indonesia Barbie® Doll

barbie 9

Thai Barbie® Doll

barbie 10

India Barbie® Doll 2nd Edition

barbie 11

Japanese Barbie® Doll 2nd Edition

barbie 12

Chinese Barbie® Doll

barbie 13

Japanese Barbie® Doll 1st edition

barbie 14

Malaysian Barbie® Doll

barbie 15

Korean Barbie® Doll

barbie 16

India Barbie® Doll

(SOURCE)

Inspiring Story of The Day: 10-Yr-Old Petitions For A Disabled Doll

American Girl Dolls is a popular line of 18-inch dolls with accompanying books, clothes and accessories. First released in 1986, the dolls and their stories were originally intended to focus on various periods in American history.

In recent years, when the dolls began telling stories of modern and contemporary life, American Girl Dolls became known for even more than teaching history. The dolls have received much praise for the diversity within their products. They have not only introduced dolls of various ethnicities and religions, they’ve even introduced dolls without hair and a hearing aid accessory for the dolls.

American Girl Dolls believe that by having dolls that they can relate to, girls can feel more comfortable in their own skin and will have an easier time accepting themselves. But despite the diverse choices, 10-year-old Melissa Shang still could not relate to the dolls she loved. That is why she began a petition to release an American Doll with a disability.

Shang has Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease which forces her to use a wheelchair. Shang is an avid fan of American Girl Dolls and wishes for nothing more than to find a doll she can relate to. More specifically, Shang enjoys the Girl of The Years. Every year, American Girl introduces a new character who faces common-day challenges.

Sheng’s goal is to have the next Girl of The Year have a disability as well. Her heartfelt petition states:

None of the American Girl Girls of the Year are like me. None of them have a disability.

Being a disabled girl is hard. Muscular Dystrophy prevents me from activities like running and ice-skating, and all the stuff that other girls take for granted. For once, I don’t want to be invisible or a side character that the main American Girl has to help: I want other girls to know what it’s like to be me, through a disabled American Girl’s story.

Disabled girls might be different from normal kids on the outside. They might sit in a wheelchair like I do, or have some other difficulty that other kids don’t have. However, we are the same as other girls on the inside, with the same thoughts and feelings. American Girls are supposed to represent all the girls that make up American history, past and present. That includes disabled girls.

 

Read her full petition here and watch her inspiring story below.

 

 

Life-Size Lady Gaga Doll VS. Gaga-Inspired Hello Kitty Doll

This past weekend, the oh-so-popular Lady Gaga was in Tokyo promoting her latest album Art Pop. Although Japanese netizens can say they’re accustomed to the eccentric, Lady Gaga still turned heads with her giant hair ears and and confusing outfit (typical of the pop diva).

During one of the press conferences, Lady Gaga held on to a Hello Kitty doll that was clearly inspired by her own look. The doll was created specifically for her by Sanrio designer Yuko Yamaguchi. As you can see in the image below, The Lady Gaga-inspired Hello Kitty doll wears a blond wig, a white pantsuit outfit with a shell bra and huge platform shoes.

After engaging in a kiss with the doll, Lady Gaga revealed that she would be auctioning the signed doll and the proceeds would go to Tomodachi, a non-profit organization. The proceeds for this particular auction would go to the Tomodachi Stella Adler Performing Arts Fellowship.

So what’s so special about this Hello Kitty doll? When we say its limited edition, we really mean limited edition. Only two of these Lady Gaga-inspired Hello Kitty dolls exist and the owner of the other one happens to be Lady Gaga herself.

The auction will continue until December 23rd and 10pm. The bid is already around $24,000. Check it out here.

In return, Lada Gaga was presented with four life-size dolls resembling herself. The dolls had such realistic detail and skin that it was hard to tell the singer apart from her dolls. The silicone “Gagadolls” were created by Orient Industry in Tokyo which specializes in synthetic “love dolls.”

All of the Gagadolls dolls were dressed up to replicate a specific outfit and look of Lady Gaga. The pop-star tweeted a photo of herself next to the dolls saying, “Who needs barbies when you can own your own life size pop star that sings to you #gagadollz.” Hey, Santa? Is it too late to add this to my Christmas list?”

Check out the video of the making of the Gagadolls below.

 

lady gaga hello kitty

lady gaga hk 2 lady gaga hk1

lady gaga doll
lady gaga doll 2

 

(Source 1, 2, 3)