Watch DAVID CHOI’s Award Video: Arts & Entertainment Award 2013

Earlier this month, Audrey Magazine and KoreAm Journal presented their 12th annual awards gala, Unforgettable. Historically, this event recognized the success of the Korean American community, but in honor of Audrey Magazine’s 10th anniversary, Unforgettable expanded to celebrate the achievements of the entire Pan-Asian community.

Aside from a lavishing dinner and show-stopping performances, Audrey Magazine and KoreAm Journal honored three individuals with achievement awards: producer of The Joy Luck Club and Shanghai Calling Janet YangYouTube artist David Choi and journalist/activist Jose Antonio Vargas.

David Choi was presented with the Arts & Entertainment Award for his success in the arts & entertainment industry and for paving the way for future Asian Americans to thrive.

About David:
David Choi is a native Los Angeles singer, songwriter and producer. On YouTube, he has close to a million subscribers and over 117,000,000 total video views. David has toured all over the world performing his original songs and covers in front of thousands of people. He wrote and self produced all three of his albums including “Forever and Ever” which debuted at #97 on the iTunes top album charts.  His songs and tracks have been heard on NBC, FOX, VH1, MTV, A&E, E!, Travel Channel, Style, PBS, Food Network, Disney, retail stores all over the USA, as well as in national commercials overseas and he has worked with brands such as Kellogg’s, Starburst, American Cancer Society, GE, YesStyle, Blue Microphones, Google, Toyota, Samsung, Hyundai and JC Penney.

WATCH HIS AWARD VIDEO BELOW:

 

Spotlight on Unforgettable’s Awardees | David Choi, Arts & Entertainment Award

David Choi is a Los Angeles-based singer/songwriter/music producer who first gained fame on YouTube for his original song “YouTube A Love Song” in 2006. Since then, he’s paved the way for independent artists who are building a fanbase and making a living themselves by mobilizing social media resources. Choi wrote and self-produced all three of his albums Only You, By My Side, and Forever and Ever, which debuted at #97 on the iTunes top album charts, his songs have used in both American and Korean television shows, and his YouTube channel boasts close to a million subscribers and over 117,000,000 total video views.

You talk a lot about a moment in high school, where you went from hating practicing your musical instruments to being obsessed with composing music. What happened?

David Choi: Well, I didn’t know you could create music. Learning an instrument is not being creative. It’s just practicing someone else’s music. You can’t be creative when somebody is telling you exactly what to do.

Once I realized I could be creative with music, something just grabbed me and made me want to do this forever. It was weird. Maybe it was me wanting to succeed? I don’t even think it was that. I just really loved it. It’s like when you fall in love with somebody, and you want to spend time with them every single day. That’s how I felt about music.

Do you find that your good songs come to you very quickly, or do you have to work hard to rewrite, analyze the lyrics or the structure, and rewrite again?

David Choi: Now that I’ve been doing it for so long, it feels more innate. I will write a song, and what matters to me is not necessarily whether it sounds good, cool, or unique, but whether it’s honest. That’s the first part. Then the second part is sitting on it after I record it, and later listening back and being more judgmental. Here, I’m putting on my producer’s hat and looking at song structure etc.

There are definitely songs that I rewrite constantly but if I keep having to do that, often I’ll just let it go. I feel like it loses something after too much revision. But that’s just the art side of me talking, not the practical side. It’s about balancing the two.

 

Check out David Choi on the cover of KoreAm Journal’s December 2013 issue. Buy a copy to read the full cover story.

For more information on 2013’s Unforgettable annual gala, click here.

For free tickets to our Unforgettable after party, click here. Hope to see you there!

David Choi’s New Music Video Reminds Us To Stop Texting While Driving

Youtube star David Choi has joined forces with the AT&T “It Can Wait” campaign.

It is reported that 75% of teens believe texting while driving is normal among their friends. As expected, texting has quickly risen to be one of the major causes of car accidents and deaths. Because of this, the “It Can Wait” campaign aims to educate people, especially teens, on the dangers of texting and driving. Simply put– its not worth risking your life for a text. It can wait. The official website tells us more about their initiative:

Each pledge made to never text while driving is a symbol of commitment to be part of a movement that helps everyone make safe choices with their wireless devices on the road. Teens on average, text five times more a day than a typical adult. That’s a lot of texting! And drivers that text while driving are much more likely to be in a crash*. So we are partnering with teens to get the word out about the serious effect texting and driving could have on their friends, their loved ones and their future.

 

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“Chill Tonight” is David Choi’s new song and music video dedicated to the campaign. The lyrics remind us that couples can be sweet and understanding without texting one another while driving.

Choi was also able to include other stars such as Big Phony, Kero One, Arden Cho to participate in this video by taking the pledge themselves. Check it out for yourself below:

And what could possibly be cuter than David Choi writing a song for a good cause? That would be his excitement to spread the word about it.

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WongFu Presents Saved By The Bell

Racebending and yellowface.

This has been a constant issue for the Asian/Asian-American community in the Entertainment Industry. As Wong Fu Productions points out, the movie 21 took a real-life story about Asian MIT students, but casted only two Asian actors. Cloud Atlas took non-Asian actors and thought make-up would be enough to pass them off as Asian (because apparently the more appropriate decision of just casting Asian actors was impossible for them). A number of Asian films are remade to be “more fit for an American audience”. The main difference? Casting Caucasian actors instead of Asian actors.

So what does Wong Fu decide to do? Turn the tables. In this funny and enlightening mockumentary, we follow the boys for their first movie production- a remake of the popular television show Saved by The Bell with a full Asian cast. By mocking the decisions of some movie-makers, Wong Fu points out how ethnicity is taken so lightly.

Our favorite moment? By using tape to make Ryan Higa’s eyes look larger and a blond wig to make him look Caucasian, Wong Fu brilliantly points out how these tactics do a poor job of changing his actual ethnicity. Check it out for yourself and tell us what you think:

Concert Recap | Nate Tao Wins Kollaboration LA

Winner Nate Tao. Photo courtesy of Kollaboration.

On Friday, seven amazing singers competed at Kollaboration Los Angles but only one came out the winner. Nate Tao, the Taiwanese American singer/songwriter stole the show and will compete at the Kollaboration finals in November.

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