Mindy Kaling’s Comic Strip!?

We know Mindy Kaling as the popular actress, comedian, writer and producer most known for her role as Kelly Kapoor in The Office and for creating and starring in The Mindy Project. Of course, here at Audrey Magazine, we also know her as our Winter 2011-12 cover girl. 

As it turns out, we’ve all been unaware of another talent under Kaling’s belt.

The 2001 Dartmouth college graduate apparently had a popular comic strip in the Dartmouth school newspaper titled “Badly Drawn Girl.”

“There were times I was at The D at like 3 a.m., outside in my car while it was snowing and I’d just put my blinkers on and sit there drawing. I don’t know how I kept up with everything.” Kaling tells Dartmouth Alumni Magazine who claim that the comic strip quickly made Kaling a “campus celebrity.”

Lucky for us, some of Kaling’s comic strips have been making its way onto social media. You may not recognize Kaling’s birthname Vera Mindy Chokalingam, but you will recognize her notable wit and humor sprinkled throughout her comics. Check them out for yourself.

 

kaling 1 kaling 2 kaling 3 kaling 4

kaling 5 kaling 6 kaling 7.

 

 

Comic Tackles Misconceptions About Feminism

These days, we get the striking feeling that feminism has become a misunderstood concept.

Time and time again, I’ve come across individuals who associate feminism as the hatred of men. Thats it. Apparently there is no actual and logical reason behind why women are feminists aside from the desire for bra-burnings, anger, and the shared hatred of all males.

Even worse, “feminism” has gained some negative connotations. Suddenly, women who are feminists are viewed as bad girlfriends and bad wives. As a result, even women who feel strongly for their rights as an individual do not want to be associated with the description “feminist.”

These misunderstandings are exactly why 20-year-old Katarzyna Babis designed a comic to show why feminism exists.

“I would like to take away the bad rep of the word ‘feminism,’ broaden the awareness of the actual agenda of this movement, and of the need for discussion about the way in which women are treated in our society,” Babis told HuffPost.

Her comic portrays the double standards that women often face and the judgements they receive no matter what lifestyle choice they make.

“[I wanted to start a] discussion about the problem with the way women are perceived by the society, about huge and often contradictory expectations that are put on their shoulders,” said Babis. “In this reality, a woman’s body doesn’t belong to her –- it is either a public property, intended only to be admired, or a source of sin, shame and guilt.”

As Asian American women, we are no strangers to expectations and judgements. Dressing a certain way or even choosing a certain career path can trigger a number of judgements from our very own family. This is exactly the thing that Babis portrays in her comic below.

 

babis

 


(Source)