Futuristic Chopsticks Can Detect Spoiled Food & Will Even Count Calories For You

 

Remember the good ol’ days when chopsticks were just used as utensils? Okay fine, we may still be in the “ol’ days” right now, but if the Chinese company Baidu succeeds, we may be kissing the reign of plain chopsticks goodbye.

Last week at an annual tech conference in Beijing, CEO Robin Li revealed that Baidu has been working to incorporate technology into our beloved utensils. To everyone’s amazement, he announced that these chopsticks of the future can detect the nutritional makeup of the food it touches. Apparently, this means the chopsticks can count calories, determine salt content and provide you with all sorts of information that you would want to know about your food before consuming it. 

Many seem to be intrigued by the chopsticks’ ability to determine whether food has gone bad. The chopsticks can also be used as a thermometer to ensure that you are frying and cooking at the correct temperature.

So how can a pair of sticks tell us so much? Apparently the high-tech chopsticks will connect with an app that will give you all the information that the chopsticks detect.

By now, many of you are probably itching to get a pair of these. No more food poisoning for you! But unfortunately, these are nicknamed the chopsticks of the future for a reason. Apparently the chopsticks are still at the very early stage of development and all information regarding the price or release date of this product has yet to be announced.

Until then, check out this cool promo video.

Photo courtesy of rocketnews24. 
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Adorable Chinese Boy Does The Best Michael Jackson Impression EVER

 

We’ve found the perfect person to help make your Friday even better! Pan Cheng Hao the tiny toddler who made his debut appearance on China’s Got Talent will certainly put a smile on your face.

The panel of judges didn’t quite know what to make of Pan Cheng Hao when he ran up on stage. He begins by very seriously teliing them that he joined China’s Got Talent to train himself and his body. Of course, later he clears things up and admits that he took part in the show to try and get the other kids to play with him again (Awww). 

The second the music begins, Pan Cheng Hao snaps into attention. He nails everything from the moonwalk to MJ’s hip thrusting and even does an impressive amount of facials. This adorable and impressive dance pushes the crowd to their feet and Pan Cheng Hao walks away with a giant “yes” from the judges.

But not before striking a few more poses, of course.

 

 

Replacing Wrinkles With Muscles: Chinese Senior Citizens Who Are More Athletic Than You

 

Whenever I spend time with family members in their 50s and 60s, they like to remind me that my 20s are my prime years and physically, things will only go downhill from this point on. They usually follow this up with horror stories about joint and muscle pain, but I won’t go into that.

Now as it turns out, if I were talking to some of the senior citizens in Beijing, China, the conversation would be very different. In fact, I may find a few who would challenge me to a push up contest. And trust me– they would win.

Head over to Beijing’s Temple of Heaven Park and you will see it covered in senior citizens. No, they’re not there peacefully feeding pieces of bread to ducks (which would have been my initial guess). They’ve taken over the jungle gym to work out.

And these aren’t just tiny, delicate work outs either. Men are doing sit ups while hanging from metal bars, women are jump-roping and just about everyone seems to be able to do pull ups better than I ever could.

You may be surprised to discover that many of these athletic senior citizens didn’t actually exercise before retiring. With a job to maintain and kids to raise, many admit to not even caring too much about their physical fitness in their younger years. Now retired, the senior citizens finally have time to focus on exercise.

As expected, China’s life expectancy seems to have benefitted from this senior citizen hobby. Huffington Post notes:

Despite rampant cigarette smoking, suffocating pollution and some ghastly food-safety scandals, China compares favorably with other upper middle income countries on life expectancy. At 75.2 years, China’s life expectancy currently lags only 3.5 years behind that of the U.S., despite China having around one-eighth of America’s per-capita GDP.

 

Check out this video below and see their athletic skills for yourself. Keep in mind that nearly everyone in this video is over 60-years-old and retired. In fact, the man in the beginning is 86 and ran a marathon just four years ago.

 

China’s Bizarre “Face-Kini” Makes It To French High Fashion

 

Back in 2012, a Chinese beach accessory known as the “face-kini” began attracting worldwide attention.

The term face-kini gained online popularity years ago when Time Magazine showed off a picture of some Chinese beach-goers who wore the bizarre mask. Now, it seems the craze is back, but not in the way you’d expect. Recently, French magazine CR Fashion Book had their models sporting (you guessed it) face-kinis.

 

 

Despite the undeniable popularity of the face-kini, the beach accessory was never actually worn for the sake of fashion in China. The full head mask, often paired with a long-sleeved body suit, was a hit in China because of its ability to protect its user from the sun. The accessory helped with Asia’s questionable obsession with pale skin.

“I’m afraid of getting dark,” a face-kini wearer explained to The New York Times. “A woman should always have fair skin. Otherwise people will think you’re a peasant.”

 

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While China used the mask as a way to retain paleness, CR Fashion Book, which was created by former editor-in-chief of French Vogue Carine Roitfed, saw the masks as an opportunity for fashion.

Check out the French fashion photos below and tell us what you think!

 

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Heartwarming Video Of Chinese Soldiers Dancing With Young Yunnan Earthquake Victims

 

How does one pick up the pieces and resume his or her life after experiencing a traumatic earthquake with a 6.5 magnitude?

On August 3, this became the question for the thousands of Chinese netizens from Ludian County in Southwest China’s Yunnan province who had survived the powerful earthquake that killed more than 600 people, injured 2,400 others and destroyed thousands of buildings, as well as 80,000 homes.

 

 

In light of the major damage the earthquake caused, more than 10,000 soldiers and volunteers rushed to the scene to help. Some of the soldiers, however, upon meeting dozens of heartbroken children who had lost their homes and family members in the quake, took it upon themselves to try and lift the spirits of the children.

Together, they taught the children China’s famous “Xiao Ping Guo” dance, from a song that has gone viral since it was featured in the movie Old Boys: The Way of The Dragon.

 

 

This video, now circulating all over social media in China, has melted the hearts of netizens everywhere. One user commented, “Finding strength does not necessarily mean crying — optimism is the best weapon you can hold on to when facing difficulties. Thank you soldiers, for this little act of kindness and your warm and generous love!”

Feature photo courtesy of xw.qq.com

 

First Chinese Woman To Successfully Climb K2, One of the World’s Deadliest Mountains

 

For those of you unfamiliar with Mount Godwin-Austen, also called K2, it is the second highest mountain in the world following Mount Everest. With a peak elevation of 8,611 meters above sea level (28,251 ft) and subject to frequent, severe storms, it is also one of the deadliest and most difficult mountains to climb in the world. In fact, it is estimated that one in every four people die from trying.

Luo Jing, 39, however, recently became the first Chinese woman to successfully climb K2, which also makes her the fourth Chinese person ever to reach the summit. But this was no new challenge by any means for the single mom. Prior to the 41-day expedition, Luo already had seven other 8,000 meter level summits conquered under her belt. She even quit her job in the IT industry in 2008 to continue her lifelong dream of conquering 14 summits, the goal she set for herself.

 

 

As you can imagine, climbing mountains is no easy task regardless of gender and it is also the reason that Luo has developed a passion for this hobby.

Different from other sports, mountain-climbing has no female or male distinctions,” she tells China Daily. “Everyone has to face the same conditions and depend on themselves as soon as they start climbing, and no one can give you particular care because you are female.” She also admitted, however, that it has been increasingly difficult to persuade fellow females to embark on this dangerous journey with her. 

 

Feature photo courtesy of Women of China 

 

Chinese Student Rejected From College Because of Disability, Reminds Us Not To Take Education For Granted

 

As any high school senior would know, applying to college can be in itself a stressful situation. Just thinking about the application process, financial aid and, of course, waiting around for the letter that will ultimately determine your future, is enough to cause a whirlwind of unnerving emotions.

In the grand scheme of things however, it’s easy to forget that most of us are lucky to even have the option of going to college at all. Especially when we live in a world where girls in other countries, like activist Malala Yousafazi, are banned from going to school under the Taliban rule because of their gender.

 

 

Fujian student Liu Wanling, a bright girl who regularly achieved high grades in her classes, unfortunately faced a huge obstacle when she applied to Jiang Xia College. Though she had scored 549 on her gaokao (the national college and university entrance exam), she was denied admission due to failing a physical test, because she is handicapped. For those of you unfamiliar with the gaokao test, it is the ultimate test that determines a student’s placement into university. Unlike the SAT, the gaokao can only be taken once a year, which means it is the only shot that most Chinese students have at attending their dream schools.

 

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According to Shanghaiist, Liu received a phone call by the university, who asked her if she would be willing to change to a less popular major. Liu agreed, but after a meeting was held by the school, as well as a discussion with doctors, they came to the consensus that she would not be able to attend the university. Disheartened by the news, Liu told reporters, “I’ve already prepared myself for the worst, but even if I try again next year, will I still be denied admission?”

Liu’s story was later posted by a user on Weibo, and immediately attracted the attention of many Chinese users. As of today, there are over 600 comments from angry netizens on the trending topic, defending Liu and even calling China “an abyss that kills people’s hope.”

 

How Technology Helped a Chinese Soldier Marry the Love of His Life

 

In this day and age, with the rapid development of technology, pretty much anything is possible. We’ve seen everything from hologram waiters to virtual girlfriends in Japan, and it seems like each latest device or invention is even more bizarre than the last.

But sometimes, technology can also be used to fulfill a man’s simple wish to get married to the love of his life when he can’t physically be there on his own wedding day. Now this we can definitely appreciate.

Xinjiang army soldier Liang Tao was set to marry his fiancée, surnamed Yang, on July 26. Sadly, though he was already on leave, Liang was called into a mission that required him to stay in Xinjiang, as he was the only leader available. Deciding to put his duties first, Tao and his fiancée called off the wedding — only to be surprised by the commissioner of the army, Zhang Jiang Guo.

 

 

Having heard of Tao’s plans to marry, Guo decided to throw the couple a surprise video wedding. Guo and Tao’s fellow army soldiers were able to connect Tao to his wedding via satellite, where he appeared on a screen at the wedding ceremony.

Though this was nowhere near ideal for the bride, Yang reportedly burst into tears as she saw her husband’s face on the screen. She expressed her gratitude to the Xinjiang army, saying, “Thank you for everything you prepared for me. Although my husband is not with me here right now, this is a more meaningful and unforgettable wedding than others.”

Check out the happy couple’s wedding pictures below:

 

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Photos courtesy of Shanghaiist

 

Why You Need To Know Chinese Actress Yao Chen

 

She is currently one of China’s most popular award-winning actresses, she’s been placed on Forbes‘ list of 100 Most Powerful Women at age 34, and she’s gorgeous. Those are just some of the many, many reasons you should get to know Yao Chen, Chinese actress, activist and philanthropist.

Named by Time Magazine as China’s “darling” of romantic comedies, the Fujian province native has starred in an a variety of films and shows, debuting in the TV drama City Man and Woman in 2002. Chen has also appeared in a slew of well-known Chinese films such as Firestorm and Colour Me Love, as well as Sophie’s Revenge, where she starred alongside A-listers Fan Bing Bing and Zhang Zi Yi.

Though she has enough awards under her belt to make any actress in the industry envious, that is not the sole reason why Chen currently has an unbelievable amount of followers on social media. She was even nicknamed the “Queen of Microblogging” because of her impressively large fan base of more than 71 million followers on Weibo, the Chinese microblogging service, surpassing Katy Perry’s 54.8 million Twitter followers.

 

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Yao Chen’s street style is pretty amazing, too.

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Turns out, the Chinese darling is way more than just a pretty face — Yao Chen also has a heart to reach out to others. According to China Daily, in 2010 she was named as UNHCR’s (UN’s Refugee Agency) first Chinese honorary patron, and in 2013 she was named Goodwill Ambassador of China by the same agency. That year, she took her first trip to Mae La, a camp in western Thailand to visit Myanmar refugees, and later on donated to UNHCR’s relief fund for people affected by the drought and famine in Africa.

Continuing with her philanthropy work, Yao recently took some time off her glamorous celebrity life and visited Syrian refugees in Lebanon, paying for the trip with money from her own pocket.

Of course, this was certainly no romantic getaway as one can imagine, and she was constantly in danger. Even after safely returning to China, she still has recurring nightmares. “On the way home from the grocery store, I find my house has been bombed. Everybody is running and crying. I cannot find my family. Then I survive alone in ruins …” she told China Daily about her nightmare. Sadly, this was reality for many of the refugees she had met, who had fled to Lebanon and sought shelter in old buildings, garages and storehouses.

 

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During her time in Beirut, Lebanon, the actress also had a number of scares, as car bombs frequently were set off in the city and noises of gun shots were constantly heard on the streets. Still, with an admirable attitude, Yao told China Daily that she would still have gone even if she had known about the amount of danger she would be put in. And though she admits she feels like there is not much she can do to help the refugee’s situation, she feels that her time there was well spent. “Our visit can’t change their fate or current situation, but it will draw attention from others, and I can share the area’s condition with more and more people,” she told China Daily.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photos courtesy of China Daily.

 

 

Chinese Doctors Bow For An 11-Year-Old’s Selfless Decision

 

These bowing doctors are not the only ones in awe of 11-year-old Liang Yaoyi. This image, along with its inspiring story, has been circulating all throughout China. Everyone seems to be impressed with this selfless young man who proved that children are most certainly capable of doing what is noble and good.

Liang was a fifth grader in Shenzhen, China. Despite his young age, he already knew that he wanted to save lives as a doctor in the future.

“There are many people doing great things in the world,” he told ChinaDaily.com. “They are great, and I want to be a great kid, too.” Well it was only a matter of time before Liang fulfilled that longing.

In April, Liang was diagnosed with brain cancer and even after multiple surgeries, his body could not handle the cancer. There on his deathbed, Liang told his parents about his final decision: After he died, Liang wanted to donate his organs so that he could help others live.

 

 

Soon after, the brave 11-year-old passed away. Touched by his incredible selflessness, Chinese doctors bowed to Liang before performing the surgery.

Although he didn’t end up becoming a doctor, Liang managed to fulfill his wish of saving lives. According to China Daily, the boy’s kidney and liver were successfully transplanted to people in need.

 

(Source 1, 2)