Japan’s Creative Take on the Haunted House

In case you needed more proof that Japan is always taking old, tired concepts and turning them on their heads before the rest of the world can.

This past summer 2013 and continuing into 2014, The Museum of Contemporary Art in Tokyo, Japan opened a new exhibit for children titled “Ghosts, Underpants and Stars,” but its most popular project is the Torafu Architects’ Haunted Play House.

Created by Koichi Suzuno and Shinya Kamuro, Haunted Play House spins off the traditional dark, zombie and ghost-filled Halloween houses with a subtle yet eerie art gallery. The architectural installation contains hidden passageways, contorted paintings, funhouse mirrors and thousands of watching eyes.

It may be spooky, but the project also aims to educate children on art history while simultaneously fueling their imaginations.

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What Happens When Asian Kids Swap Outfits With Their Grandparents

The Singaporean artist simply known as “Qozop,” proves that age is just a number in many ways.

For instance, the artist appears to be rather new to the scene. Qozop’s facebook emerged late last month and the official blog has only two posts thus far. In fact the artist is such a mystery that the about me is kept plain and simple. It reads, ”There is nothing special about me. I am just an artist who has caught a picture-making sickness.”

Despite Qozop’s ”young” talent, the artist has already picked up quite a bit of attention. Qozop has been featured in Design TAXI, Demilked and Huffington Post.

The art that has sparked attention is Qozop’s series titled “Spring — Autumn.” He photographed pairs of relatives, such as parents and kids or grandparents and grandchildren, then had them exchange outfits.

“Fashion (other than wrinkles) is one of the best tell-tales of how old a person is, or what generation they hail from,” Qozop writes. “Skinny jeans just aren’t a thing for old people. But! Imagine a world where people of a certain age need not necessarily dress a certain way.”

Many viewers have interpreted the series as an exploration of identity and age, especially within Asian Americans.

Take a look at the entire series of Asian youth trading outfits with their parents and grandparents.

 

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Red Hong Yi’s Chinese Makeup Art

No, we’re not talking about Michelle Phan-esque YouTube tutorials. Malaysian artist-architect Hong Yi, who also goes by her nickname “Red,” has been referred to as the artist who “loves to paint, but not with a paintbrush.”

Yi, who owns her own design studio and travels for work in between Shanghai and Malaysia, is known for using unique mediums for her work. She has made portraits out of flower petals, sunflower seeds, candle wax, bamboo sticks and coffee cup stains. She’s even painted an entire portrait using a basketball as a brush.

The artist claims that she was inspired to use everyday objects for her artwork after moving to Shanghai to work. She argues that some of the most overlooked items can create the best pieces of art.

In honor of Chinese New Year, Yi has made one of her most creative projects yet. Using only make up, Yi has managed to recreated scenes from Chinese myths and create cultural and traditional symbols of the country such as opera masks, firecrackers, cherry blossom trees and goldfish.

The artist explains, “Chinese art requires a lot of precision and skill – one stroke can make a huge difference I felt that this is similar to how a woman carefully puts on her make-up.”

Check out her impressive artwork below and be sure to look into her other works here.

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Mindy Kaling’s Comic Strip!?

We know Mindy Kaling as the popular actress, comedian, writer and producer most known for her role as Kelly Kapoor in The Office and for creating and starring in The Mindy Project. Of course, here at Audrey Magazine, we also know her as our Winter 2011-12 cover girl. 

As it turns out, we’ve all been unaware of another talent under Kaling’s belt.

The 2001 Dartmouth college graduate apparently had a popular comic strip in the Dartmouth school newspaper titled “Badly Drawn Girl.”

“There were times I was at The D at like 3 a.m., outside in my car while it was snowing and I’d just put my blinkers on and sit there drawing. I don’t know how I kept up with everything.” Kaling tells Dartmouth Alumni Magazine who claim that the comic strip quickly made Kaling a “campus celebrity.”

Lucky for us, some of Kaling’s comic strips have been making its way onto social media. You may not recognize Kaling’s birthname Vera Mindy Chokalingam, but you will recognize her notable wit and humor sprinkled throughout her comics. Check them out for yourself.

 

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You Won’t Believe What This Artist Did For Her Late Mother

Sun Yuan and Peng Yu are artists who have been working together in Beijing since the late 90′s. The duo is known for using extreme and sometimes controversial mediums. For instance, the two have used live animals, human fat tissue and baby cadavers within their installations. These works of art often deal with the theme of death. As expected, the two have come up with some of China’s most controversial pieces of art.

This year, the duo put together a very personal piece inspired by the passion of Peng Yu’s mother.

According to RocketNews24, Peng Yu conducted an interview with her mother before she died to discuss the end of her life and her thoughts on afterlife. Peng Yu’s mother went into detail about rebirth and reincarnation.

“If I die, I don’t want to come back as some creature that lives on land,” she explained. “I want to fly, soaring above the earth in the company of red-crowned cranes. How free it would be, live where I want, land where ever I wish.

Inspired by her words, the artists decided to honor her life with a piece called “If I Died.” The installment portrays what his mother hoped for in her afterlife. The piece shows Peng Yu’s mother soaring with the bird and see creatures. Precisely as she had wished, she seems at peace.

The birds are stuffed specimens while Peng Yu’s mother and the sea creatures are made from fiberglass and silica gel. Check them out below.

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Must-See Stop Motion Ad Using Just A Tissue

Say goodbye to the usual tissue ads showing sick kids and pink noses. Nepia, a Japanese tissue company, has decided to go a completely different direction with their advertising.

Quite a bit more visually stunning than a child blowing their nose into a tissue, Nepia has opted to use “tissue craft art.” The very skilled hands behind this video uses the soft tissue to form trees, animals and even human beings for their stop-motion video.

Audiences are stunned that material as soft as a tissue could be used for such intricate shapes.

The video shows much appreciation for the trees that the tissues are made from. Because of these sentiments, the ad includes the statement “Great tissue comes from great trees. We thank our forests.”

Watch the ad below as well as the behind-the-scenes footage. You’ll definitely grow an appreciation for all the hard work put into this advertisement.

MUST SEE: Chinese Artist Liu Bolin Disappears Into His Artwork

Over the years, you’ve probably seen Chinese artist Liu Bolin grow in popularity. Or rather, you probably haven’t seen Liu Bolin because his art pieces, which consist of him disappearing into intricate backgrounds, have given him the nickname “The Invisible Man.”

Liu Bolin’s style of artwork originally began as performance art from his solo shows in Beijing in 1998. By 2005, he began to work on his most famous series “Hiding in the City,” which addressed social problems due to China’s rapid economic development.

His art pieces, which are both amazing to look at and meaningful, have gained him international recognition and have been featured in a number of major contemporary photography festivals.

This month, Liu Bolin  has blended himself into shelved lined with comic books as part of a series of performances in Caracas, on November 2013.

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Check out his other amazing pieces below:
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Adorable Engagement Photo Idea: Paint War

Story by Taylor Weik.

Typically, newly-engaged couples opt to send out their “Save the Date”s on fine stationary with elegant calligraphy. Jagdeep and Jasleen decided to take their engagement to the next level by smothering their announcement on a white wall with paint.

New York City-based wedding photographer Amandeep Nagpal of A.S Nagpal Photography, who shot the couple’s messy, bright engagement photos, fell in love with the idea after Jagdeep suggested bringing paint into the shoot.

Nagpal brought his studio setup to the indoor location, laid out cans of vibrant paint and brushes, and let the paint war commence between the white-clad couple.

“I love couples that want to go the extra mile to help create something fun and different,” Nagpal wrote on his photography website.

Check out more of his photography here.

 

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Survival Kit For Deteriorating Air Quality: A Look Into Our Future?

Designboom.com receives projects from the public under their “DIY Submissions” feature. One project in particular, which addresses a very real and very scary issue, caught our eye.

The air quality within crowded living environments has been getting worse with every progressing year. Recently, Huffington Post reported on the dangerous smog conditions in China. The northern city of Harbin, for example, has air pollution 40 times higher than the international safety standard set by the World Health Organization. Harbin’s official news site noted that the smog is so overwhelming, it is impossible to even see your own fingers in front of you.

This toxic atmosphere forces Chinese citizens to wear masks, but what happens when the masks aren’t enough? If air pollution is getting worse each day, what other options will we have?

Designer Chiu Chih explores that very question in the project titled “voyage on the planet.” Design boom describes the hard-hitting project below:

The subtle mysteriousness of the planet’s unknown future often forces human beings to adapt – and potentially create new equipment just to survive. The design responds to a sense of curiosity towards this ever-changing environment – where old buildings are demolished and new modern ones continue to rise. Society and culture modify from one moment to the next, which in some cases Chiu Chih believes renders people hopeless, while for others it brings about hope and new expectations. The scary nature of this vulnerability is most poignant in the depletion of natural energy resources. ‘Voyage on the planet’ brings attention to the sate of the earth, and like new energy that is sought after as a replacement, it raises the question of further exploration and continued survival on the planet.

 

Check out the powerful images below.

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These Naptime Adventures Are A Must-See

According to Parenting.com, babies are incapable of nightmares because they haven’t yet grasped the concept of fear. Instead, their dreams are filled with silent, vivid images. So what exactly do babies dream about during these sleep-fests? Researchers are still in the dark when it comes to knowing what babies actually dream about, but Queenie Liao certainly has an adorable way of showing what she thinks these dreams consist of.

Liao, mother of three, decided to utilize her baby’s naptime for some creative art. Using household materials such as blankets and stuffed animals, Liao makes every naptime photo an adventure.

Her photo art album, Wengenn in Wonderland, consists of over a hundred naptime adventures with Liao’s son, Wengenn. Trust us, it’s quite a delight.

If baby dreams are anything like the ones Queenie Liao imagines, then we certainly have something to be envious about.

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