Disney Princesses Re-Imagined with Different Ethnicities

For years, we have hoped for more variation in ethnicity when it comes to Disney Princesses. Don’t get me wrong– we love the current Princesses, but who doesn’t want a Princess they can connect with on a cultural level?

This may be the reason that Tumblr artist lettherebedoodles created a series depicting famous Disney Princesses with different ethnicities.

“I honestly just did this for fun. No political agenda, no ulterior motives,” the artist, who goes by TT, explained. “I just love Disney and chose a few of my favorite characters to alter. I feel like there’s beauty in every racial background, and this is honestly nothing more then an exploration of different races from a technical and artistic standpoint.”

“Fairy tales are constantly being taken out of their cultural context. Most of the fairy tales that we know now were taken out of their original cultural context and altered,” TT continues. “Aladdin was originally set in China. The Frog Prince was Latin, and was altered over and over again in several countries. The stories have been and can be altered in many ways.”

TT also says that the race-bending art was created in hopes of seeing more diversity in our media. Of course, we whole-heartedly agree. Check out the thought-provoking art below:

 


Screen Shot 2014-05-14 at 12.08.44 PM
Screen Shot 2014-05-14 at 12.08.57 PM Screen Shot 2014-05-14 at 12.09.06 PM
Screen Shot 2014-05-14 at 12.09.16 PM

 

Screen Shot 2014-05-14 at 12.09.27 PM

Screen Shot 2014-05-14 at 12.09.43 PM Screen Shot 2014-05-14 at 12.10.11 PM

 

(source 1, 2)

Incredible Miniature Art by Tatsuya Tanaka

Tatsuya Tanaka, a Kagoshima-based artist and art director, is quickly becoming a big deal for his project called “Miniature Calendars.”

Tanaka places delicate and tiny figurines with real, life-size objects. He has been able to create impressive and creative backgrounds and settings using these everyday objects. In one photo, pins and rubber bands create the ring of a boxing match. In another picture, the curve of a banana becomes the perfect snowboarding slope.

“Everyone must have had similar thoughts at least once. Broccoli and parsley might sometimes look like a forest, or the tree leaves floating on the surface of the water might sometimes look like little boats,” Tanaka explains on his official website.

His work may be small, but Tenaka’s creative mind has given him giant attention. Tenaka has nearly 14 thousand followers on Twitter and his Instagram, where he posts most of his artwork, has nearly 60 thousand followers.

Step into Tenaka’s creative world with his photos below.

Screen Shot 2014-04-24 at 12.28.54 PM Screen Shot 2014-04-24 at 12.29.25 PM Screen Shot 2014-04-24 at 12.30.04 PM Screen Shot 2014-04-24 at 12.30.22 PM Screen Shot 2014-04-24 at 12.30.38 PM Screen Shot 2014-04-24 at 12.30.56 PM Screen Shot 2014-04-24 at 12.31.15 PM Screen Shot 2014-04-24 at 12.31.33 PM Screen Shot 2014-04-24 at 12.31.49 PM

Screen Shot 2014-04-24 at 12.32.21 PM Screen Shot 2014-04-24 at 12.32.38 PM Screen Shot 2014-04-24 at 12.33.10 PM Screen Shot 2014-04-24 at 12.33.59 PM Screen Shot 2014-04-24 at 12.35.51 PM

 

This Malala Portrait Has An Estimated Value of $80,000

A portrait by one of Britain’s leading portrait painters, Jonathan Yeo, has an estimated value of  $60,000 to $80,000. What’s so special about the portrait? It happens to have one of the most widely known icons of our generation, Malala Yousafzai.

If you don’t know who Malala Yousafzai is, then you ought to learn up. Malala was only a young girl when she became an activist for rights to education and rights for women. At the young age of 11, she began blogging about her life under Taliban rule. This was so powerful that in 2009, a New York Times documentary was filmed about her life. Her actions were seen as unacceptable and in 2012, Malala was shot in the head and neck by Taliban gunman in an attempt to murder her. The strong young lady survived and continues to fight for what she believes in.

The canvas, which measures nearly one meter by one meter, has been on display at the National Portrait Gallery in London.

“The funds raised will support the work of the Malala Fund, including helping young Syrian refugees in Jordan and girls freed from child labor now attending school in Pakistan,” said Malala. “I hope that whoever buys the painting knows that their generosity will directly help children in some of the most challenging environments in the world.”

Yeo met Malala back in 2013 and painted the young girl in Britain. “I hope the painting reflects the slight paradox of someone with enormous power yet vulnerability and youth at the same time,” he said.

(source)

Time Travel Through South Korea

Korean artist Sungseok Ahn was shocked when he paid a visit to Seoul, Korea. Many of the historical landmarks he had studied about had transformed into bright and shiny skyscrapers over the years.

These emotions inspired Ahn to create the art project “Historical Present.” The idea behind the project was simple. Ahn projected an old image of a popular site onto its current state. The pictures were usually taken at sunrise or sunset when the light is ideal for beaming.

Ahn got the black-and-white photographs of Seoul in it’s former state from an old picture book that was published by the Japanese government when Korea was under imperial Japanese rule. His projections have framed Seoul’s best known and historic surfaces such as the Gyeongbokgung Palace and the Great South Gate.

Using this method of “time traveling” and showing us both the past and present of South Korea, Ahn allows us to “question the way we treat our history and explores the dynamics between space and time at the same time.”

Ahn says this project is about “the “psychological void that emerges as we live our lives forgetting.” He adds that the project is a reminder that “someday…we’re [all going to disappear] likes people in old pictures. Things change and we’re gone.”

Though his words are sad and clearly mourning the past, the photographic in “Historical Present” are nothing short of beautiful.

ahn 1 ahn 2 ahn 3


ahn 4 ahn 5 ahn 6

(source)

 

Julie’s Kitchen: Introducing the Food Collage

Here at Audrey, we’ve seen all sorts of art mediums. We’ve seen a Jackie Chan portrait made entirely of chopsticks, cultural art made from make up, and even stop-motion art using a tissue. Well Julie Lee is here to add her name to this list of creative artists.

Lee is the mastermind behind popular blog, Julie’s Kitchen. Her form of art? Food collages. Lee defies all parents who have told their children not to play with their food and the results are beautiful. Using goods from the Saturday Santa Monica Farmers Market, Lee creates captivating photography.

“My food collages on Instagram started out as a way to showcase seasonal and local offerings from neighborhood farmers markets,” Lee writes on her website. “It’s evolved into an ongoing project in the study of plant design, exploration of color theory, and pure, unadulterated food-love. Let’s be real– I like to play with my food. Thanks for letting me nerd out.”

The julieskitchen instagram account has nearly 60,000 followers and for good reason. Her photos are both beautiful and delicious. Check them out below.

fc 1 fc 2 fc 3 fc 4


fc 5 fc 6 fc 7 fc 8

 

Sailor Moon Characters Re-imagined as The Avengers

Yesterday, we showed you what happens when an artist re-imagines some of the most beloved Disney characters in the opposite gender. Today, we have yet another artist blowing us away with creativity.

An artist known as Jei Shepard caught our attention for this impressive artwork. Not much is known about this artist. In fact, all we know is a list of interests on Jei Shepard’s tumblr which include Iron Man, Avengers, X-Men, Batman, Supergirl, Mass Effect, Sailor Moon, Dragonball Z, Final Fantasy, BBC Sherlock, Grimm and Agents of SHIELD.

Luckily for us, Jei Shepard decided to take two of those interests for a crossover: Sailor Moon and the Avengers. The result is better than anyone could have expected.

Even though these girls aren’t actually Marvel superheros, they certainly look good in the outfits. Check it out below and be sure to support Jei Shepard’s art here.

sma 1 sma 2 sma 3

sma 4 sma 5

Talented Artist Gender-Bends Disney Characters

Not much is known about the Canada-based artist Sakimi Chan, but one thing is certain: this is one talented artist.

Although Sakimi Chan’s Facebook was only created in January 2014, it has already gathered 124,000 likes and for good reason! According to the Facebook description, Sakimi Chan loves to “draw fantasy, sci-fi and gender bending.”

It seemed only a matter of time that the digital artist took on beloved Disney characters. Sakimi Chan recently gained viral attention for her gender-bending of Ariel, Belle, Pocahontas and various other characters we grew up with.

Check them out below and be sure to support Sakimi Chan’s work through these sites:
Facebook
Tumblr
deviantART

GB 1 GB 2 GB 3

GB 4 GB 5 GB 6 GB 7 GB 8

(source)

 

 

Jackie Chan Portrait Made Entirely of Chopsticks

A few months ago, we showed you the art of Red Hong Yi. Referred to as the artist who “loves to paint, but not with a paintbrush,” Hong Yi utilized make up to recreated scenes from Chinese myths and create cultural and traditional symbols of the country such as opera masks, firecrackers, cherry blossom trees and goldfish.

Luckily for us, Hong Yi continues to use unique mediums for her work. She has made portraits out of flower petals, sunflower seeds, candle wax, bamboo sticks and coffee cup stains. She’s even painted an entire portrait using a basketball as a brush.

Most recently, Hong Yi has payed homage to actor, action choreographer, comedian, director, producer, martial artist, screenwriter, entrepreneur, singer, and stunt performer, Jackie Chan.

In addition to managing his first K-Pop band, JJCC, Chan is also celebrating his 60th birthday this year. In honor of this, Red Hong Yi decided to create a portrait of him. Of course, this isn’t just an ordinary portrait. It’s created with 64,000 chopsticks.

In the video description, Hong Yi writes, “Jackie turns 60 this year and being an artist who paints without a paintbrush, I spent a looong time thinking about what material to use for his portrait! He is an actor, a martial arts master, an environmentalist and is a world-renowned face! I finally decided on chopsticks – a symbol of the Chinese culture, Jackie has used chopsticks during his kungfu scenes in a few movies like the Fearless Hyena and Karate Kid. I used disposable bamboo chopsticks to show that disposable materials can be reused and made into something else more meaningful and beautiful. I spent a month collecting these chopsticks from cafes, stalls and factories in Zhejiang and Beijing, then tying each of them up. So honoured to present it at his concert on 6/4/14. Happy 60th birthday, Jackie!”

 

 

Must-See Origami Street Art

When Paris-born Mademoiselle Maurice spent time in Japan, she experienced earthquakes, a tsunami and the nuclear power plant explosion of Fukushima. The devastating experiences inspired the 29-year-old artist to remind others of the beauty life still has to offer. Maurice decided to do this by using an art she learned in Japan: origami.

During her stay in Japan, Maurice learned of the thousand paper crane legend. The ancient Japanese legend says that anyone who folds a thousand origami cranes will be granted a wish. This legend is most known through the story of Sadako Sasaki who developed leukemia at the age of 12 because of exposure to radiation from the atomic bombing of Hiroshima during World War II. In the popular book Sadako and The Thousand Paper Cranes, Sadako folded a little over 600 paper cranes before succumbing to her illness. Moved by her efforts, her friends and classmates decided to fold the rest in her honor.

Maurice realized that she too could create beauty and emotions through origami. Rather than put her work up in museums, Maurice has decided to practice her craft in the streets so that the public could enjoy it.

According to her website, the goal of her work is to “break the monotony of urban living to bring a carousel of emotion to those who see her work.”

It takes her many days to complete each art piece. Mademoiselle Maurice has decided to involve local schools, organizations and volunteers to help her fold the beautiful paper creations and create art as a community.

ori 2 ori 3 ori 4


ori 5 ori 6 ori 7 ori 8

Check out her official website here. 

(source)

“It’s not what it seems” by Hikaru Chu

A 21-year-old Japanese art student has been attracting quite a bit of attention for her art. In particular, the work of Hikaru Chu seems to be gaining popularity because of her talented ability to trick our eyes.

Using acrylic paints, Chu has taken a number of items and has disguised them to look like something entirely different. She has titled the series “It’s not what it seems” and has given audiences a kick out of trying to guess what the object is without the disguise.

Chu’s attention to detail, color and texture proves that her talent is beyond her years. Check out the photo series below.

And trust us when we say her other art pieces are just as impressive and convincing. She has been able to make it look like a woman’s head completely detaches and a man’s back is made entirely of books. Don’t believe us? Take a look at her artwork for yourself.

hc 1
What appears to be a cucumber…
hc 2
… is actually a banana.
hc 3
What appears to be a tangerine…
hc 4
… is actually a tomato.

hc 5
What appears to be an eggplant…
hc 6
… is actually an egg.
hc 7
What appears to be a daifuku rice cake…
hc 8
.
..is actually an orange.