Artist Shows Disney Princesses As Acid Attack Survivors to Raise Awareness

For some people, the idea of an acid attack is far too cruel to even fathom. But for the 1,000 women who are attacked with acid every year in India, this is a very dangerous reality, and that’s exactly what artist Alexsandro Palombo wants to make sure the world realizes.

Acid attacks are a form of assault where the attacker throws acid or any other corrosive substance onto the body of someone else to try to maim and disfigure them. Because death is not a common result of an acid attack, the goal of this attack is lifelong bodily disfigurement. The acid often burns through skin, cartilage and bone. This not only leaves severe scars and disfiguration, it can lead to blindness, deafness, the inability to talk and various mental health issues.

Although acid attacks can happen to anyone, the majority of acid attacks happen to women in Central and South Asia. Worst of all, these inhumane attacks are often a response to a marriage refusal. Imagine being attacked for simply telling a man you’re not interested? Huffington Post points out that the Taliban has even used this form of assault to scare away young girls from the classroom. As much as we all want this to stop, there are no stern laws against acid attacks within the Indian judicial system. This is where artist Alexsandro Palombo wants to see change.

“If we just observe and stand still, then we are all accomplices,” Palombo said. “And [to] be complicit means to take the side of those cowards, monsters and criminals.”

Realizing that many people around the world do not know about (or simply ignore) acid attacks, Palombo wanted to draw attention to and raise awareness for this issue in the most startling way he could think of: He portrayed beloved Disney Princesses as acid attack survivors.

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Be sure to check out more of Alexsandro Palombo‘s work on his Facebook. If you want to see the brave faces of actual acid attack survivors, check out this incredibly inspiring photo shoot.

 

All photos courtesy of Alexsandro Palombo’s official Facebook page. 

 

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World’s First Latte Art Stop-Motion Video: 1000 Cups of Coffee in Two Minutes

 

You may have seen it in fancy coffee shops or on Instgram, but you’ve never seen latte art like this.

In recent years, latte art has gotten more and more popular. These days, it’s nothing new to see your favorite manga or cartoon character on a cup of joe. In fact, we’ve even seen 3D latte art made from the foam. But one thing we’ve never seen is 1000 cups of coffee art in under 2 minutes. Well now all you caffeine-lovers can rejoice because that’s about to change.

Japanese coffee maker, Maxim Stick, released one of the most impressive stop-motion videos we’ve ever seen. “Latte Motion” is described as the world’s first latte art animation. Using various items (such as nuts and macarons) to create the background, and an incredible combination of patience and determination, Maxim Stick shot 1000 cups of coffee to create the heart-warming video.

As you can see in the behind-the-scenes video [below], this was no easy task. The team had to carefully cut each stencil to create smooth transitions between the cups. All coffee cups were then gently covered with cocoa powder and placed in an exact position.

The video has generated nearly 500,000 views and has received ongoing praise for it’s creativity and the hard work behind it. So even though it looked like a painfully tiring process, it was certainly worth it.

Besides, if they ever got tired they sure had plenty of coffee lying around to stay awake.

 

 

Feature image courtesy of RocketNews24.


Filipino Artist Uses Sun and Magnifying Glass to Create Detailed Portraits

 

As a child, I was left in awe after I discovered that the sun is the source of the earth’s heat and energy. I can still recall hunching over a piece of paper with a magnifying glass to test if the sun would leave a burn mark. As it turned it out, this was a much harder task than I had anticipated. Unlike Toy Story, where it only took Sid a few seconds to burn a spot on Woody’s forehead, this task required a lot of patience and a steady hand– I had neither.

However, in the Philippines, Jordan Mang-osan is doing what my 5-year-old self couldn’t do. He uses the power of the sun to create images from vast landscapes of Philippine’s cascading green rice terraces to larger-than-life portraits of Manny Pacquaio. Many pieces draw inspiration from the natural beauty of his home–the Cordilllera mountains. Much like Kalinga’s last traditional tattoo artist, his choice in medium stays true to his roots as he uses only a magnifying glass, the sun and wood– a method that has been coined as “solar pyrography.” It requires the utmost patience and poise.

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All photos courtesy of Jordan Mang-osan.

 


Artist Reimagines Western Fairy Tales with a Korean Twist

 

Anna built a snowman and Elsa formed her ice castle in an unnamed Nordic country. But what if the story of Disney’s Frozen took place on the Korean peninsula?

Korean artist and illustrator Na Young Wu, who goes by the handle Obsidian (@obsidian00) on Twitter, recently unveiled a series of illustrations depicting Western fairy tales as if they had taken place in Korea. Elsa’s glittering dress, for example, would look more like a hanbok, like so:

 

Check out the rest of the artist’s Korean-Western fairy tales series below. You can click on the tweets to view each image separately. The Frog PrinceThe Little Mermaid and Snow White:

 

 

Alice in WonderlandLittle Red Riding Hood and Beauty and the Beast:

 

More Hans Christian Andersen: The Wild Swans and The Snow Queen with Chinese and Japanese influences, respectively.  

You can view more of the artist’s work on her Naver blog. Follow her on Twitter (@00obsidian00).

 

–STORY BY JAMES S. KIM
This story was originally featured on iamkoream.com

Video of the Day: Learn How to Draw Baymax and the Rest of Big Hero 6

 

There’s undeniable excitement over the release of Disney’s newest animated film, Big Hero 6. If you’ve already watched the heartwarming, action-packed movie, then we’re going to go ahead and bet that you fell in love with the huggable robot, Baymax.

Built by Tadashi Hamada, Baymax is a healthcare providing robot who can detect any patient’s level of pain with a simple scan, and is sufficiently programmed to treat nearly any ailment. Best of all, Baymax gives hugs.

Can’t get enough of this personal healthcare companion? Check out this tutorial from Disney Insider featuring Jin Kim, the Character Design Supervisor at Walt Disney Animation Studios. Kim skillfully demonstrates how to draw Baymax as well as all the other loveable characters from Big Hero 6.

 

 

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Need more Big Hero 6 in your system? Don’t forget to check out these:

1) Japanese American Hapa Ryan Potter on His Big Debut in “Big Hero 6″
2) The Super Jamie Chung in “Big Hero 6″
3) “Big Hero 6″’s Hapa Brothers: Daniel Henney and Ryan Potter 

Jen Lee’s “Dear Korea” Shows What It’s Like To Live In Korea As A Korean American

 

Residing in a little villa in Gwangju, South Korea, Texan Jen Lee is living the dream of being a comic artist. In 2010, Lee packed her bags in Houston and followed her boyfriend, an English teacher, to the Land of the Morning Calm. It was a unique and exciting opportunity for Lee to move to Gwangju, located some 180 miles south of Seoul. The city is best known for being the birthplace of the modern Korean democratic movement, as well as for its parks, museums and hip urban art scene. “I haven’t moved once since I got here,” says the 27-year-old. “I’ve grown fairly attached to this lovely city.”

As an adolescent, Lee often felt isolated from the Korean community in Texas. Her parents immigrated to the United States a few years before Lee was born. “I never really identified with the Korean side of myself,” she recalls. “That being said, growing up where my cultural background was mostly unknown to everyone around me came with its awkward moments.” So Lee turned to art. “According to my mother, I was drawing before I could form proper sentences,” she says. But it wasn’t until elementary school that she began drawing comics.

The idea for her popular comic strip, “Dear Korea,” stemmed from conversations with fellow expats about the funny and odd moments they’d experienced living in Korea. “I thought it would be interesting to create a comic that highlighted what it was like to live in Korea as a Korean American,” explains Lee. “While people like me are technically expats, I think our perspectives may be a little different from those who grew up with little or no Korean influences in their lives.”

Anyone who has lived on her own or has an interest in Korean culture can relate to Lee’s comics. Indeed, though “Dear Korea” started out as a Web comic, it has since branched out and the strip is now published in various magazines and publications around the country. “From what I can tell, my comics are read by expats from all over the world,” says Lee.

In addition to the opportunities — Lee supports herself with freelance art gigs, radio work and tutoring — living in Korea has given Lee a new perspective on her ancestral homeland. She says she loves the food and the affordable health care. But perhaps the best part of living in Gwangju is finally feeling connected to a community, one filled with a good number of expats: “I honestly don’t know how long I would have lasted here without them.”

For more “Dear Korea,” go to dearkoreacomic.com.

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–STORY BY JULIE CARLSON
This story was originally published in our Fall 2013 issue. Get your copy here

 

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Thailand Creates Art Exhibit For The Blind and Visually Impaired

 

The Thai Ministry of Tourism joined forces with Thai universities such as Chulalongkorn University and Silpakorn University to fulfill a single goal: To create a space where the visually impaired could experience art the same way others do.

Admittedly, many of us take our vision for granted when it comes to art. We forget that much of the beauty found in art exhibits — paintings, photographs and sculptures with giant “do not touch” signs in front– are only available to those of us with sight.

Well not anymore. In fact, you can kiss that “do not touch sign” goodbye.

Found in Chiang Mai, Thailand, a pilot project called “‘Feel the Happiness: Art for the Blind” aims to promote equality in the country by creating a space in which the blind and visually impaired can experience the country’s famous landmarks through feeling. For instance, there are bells in the shape of Buddha which can appeal to the sense of touch and the sense of hearing.

They hope to have artists create more sculptured and interactive artwork to be placed at Thailand’s tourist sites that allow the blind and visually impaired to experience the art.

Read more about this inspiring project here.

 

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Adorable 101-Year-Old Man Just Became A Model

 

Don’t get the wrong idea about what sort of modeling career 101-year-old Kaoru Nozaki has. He’s definitely not flaunting this season’s menswear down the runway. Instead, his modeling career began when he had photographs taken showing what he loves to do most: Drink coffee.

Nozaki was well-known in his Japanese hometown. The kind man could always be found at the coffee shop (and we mean he was always at the coffee shop). Apparently, he looked so natural and calm while drinking his beverages that he piqued the interest of a gallery that happened to be running a “Coffee Cup Museum” exhibit.

The exhibit featured coffee cups from all over the world as well as an array of photos showing coffee drinkers like Nozaki. Dramafever reports Nozaki’s local community has been supportive and positive about his adorable modeling experience.

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Controversial Japanese Illustration Tries To Show What Type of Women Attract Sexual Assault

 

No matter what a woman wears, she is never “asking” for sexual assault. No matter what. So whenever someone tells me I shouldn’t dress a certain way lest I attract unwanted male attention, it’s enough to send me into a angry rage about why they’re wrong.

This is undoubtedly why the Japanese artist who goes by Twitter username @Nakashima273, faced a lot of criticism for his controversial illustration.  In the illustration, he shows 6 females of different height, age, and clothing choice. He then goes on to explain which types of women are more targeted for sexual assault and why. As you can expect, his piece was met with an explosion of angry comments.

However, the artist argued that he was simply showing facts. He points out that the illustration aimed to disprove the common belief that dressing provocatively was “asking for it.”

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Apparently, the picture above shows the easiest targets to the hardest targets from left to right. Surprisingly, those who dressed more modestly attracted more sexual assault. The artist references a blog which states:

Suspects in sex crime cases were asked why they chose that person [to attack]. Fewer than 5 percent said they targeted someone because they were wearing provocative clothing. In rape cases, the most common reason given was ‘they seemed like they wouldn’t report it to the police’ (45%). In indecent assault cases, the most common reason was ‘they seemed meek; I didn’t think they’d be able to stop me’ (48%).

Ayako Uchiyama, who led the research, said ‘It’s often thought that [women] who wear provocative clothing will be targets [for sex crimes], but that’s not the case.

 

Admittedly, we’ve definitely heard the saying that says the more provocatively one dresses, the more likely they attract unwanted male attention. In fact, an Indian politician was under quite a bit of heat for claiming that “rape occurs when women dress and act inappropriately.”

The artist has protested that the point of his illustration was to show that such a belief was incorrect. Does this make his purpose justified? Not quite. As one commenter points out, “Talking about people who attract chikan [sexual assault] easily is looking at it the wrong way. It’s like saying the victim is in the wrong.”

Tell us what you think!

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Dog And Owner “Wear Each Other’s Hair” … Because It’s Art

 

Most pet owners know there’s a thin line between loving your pet and loving your pet. Well Japanese artist Aki Inomata dangerously walks that line with her new project “I Wear the Dog’s Hair, and the Dog Wears My Hair.” Yes, the title is quite self-explanatory.

Inomata collected bundles of her own hair and wove it into a small coat for her dog. She then collected heaps of hair from her dog and created a trendy, tan coat for herself. Yes, they literally wear each other’s hair.

Although this merely seems like an extreme pet love, Inomata swears that her art project aims to show a conflicted owner’s feelings over “owning” another living creature.

“The concept of my works is to get people to perceive the modes of life of various living creatures by experiencing a kind of empathy towards them.” she said in a statement to DesignBoom.

If you’re interested in checking out this peculiar piece of art, the exhibit is currently running at the Hagisa Gallery in Tokyo.

 

 

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Photos courtesy of Huffington Post.