New Reality Show to Feature Lives of ‘Ultra Rich Asian Women’

Story by Ruth Kim. 

When we said we needed more Asian representation on screen, this wasn’t exactly what we had in mind. A new Vancouver reality show will spotlight the “luxurious lifestyles of ultra rich Asian girls.” The name of the series: HBIC TV, which stands for Hot Bitch In Charge. Cringe.

hbic tv 1

Although details on the show are sparse at the moment, HBIC TV has announced that a casting call and audition will be held on June 26. The producers, Kevin K. Li and Desmond Chen, say that most of the show will be in Chinese and will feature young women who have inherited large fortunes, according to CTV News Vancouver.

On the show’s official Facebook page, there’s a brief description of the types of girls producers are looking for:

Are you the next #HBIC of Vancouver? Got a Centurion Black Amex Card?

Hermes, Lanvin, Dior, Louboutin, Chanel, Lambos and Ferraris are all a part of the daily lives of our HBICtv Divas.

“If you’re into the high fashion, the couture, the fancy cars, and the foie gras dinners, and popping the champagnes on the weekend like it’s every day,” Li said. “You know, Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous, but in Vancouver with this demographic.”

A short preview video for the show features a group of rich, Asian women buying necklaces worth $150,000 and gabbing about each other’s plastic surgery results.

While the show has already been met with groans from the Asian American community, there will likely be an audience that tunes in to all of the drama. Think we’ll have our next Asian Kardashian?

Top photo via HBICtv Facebook, other photo and video via VanCity Buzz
This story was originally published on iamkoream.com.

DOs and DON’Ts: Harem Pants

Harem pants are all the rage. They’re flowy like a skirt, but have legs like pants. It’s the best of both worlds, but only if you wear them right. Here are the dos and don’ts of this fashion trend:

 


DO pair them with cropped jackets and shirts. It accentuates the pants and makes your torso look longer.

crop top


DON’T over accessorize. The pants are the attention getter, not the bling.

accessory


DO wear heels. Harem pants can make your legs look short and stumpy, so add height with a pair of heels.

heels


DON’T wear baggy tops. Balance the fullness of the pants with a fitted top.

baggy

 

Even More Photos Of The Brazilian Man Who Got Surgery To Look Asian

The newest internet sensation is undoubtedly Xiahn, a 25-year-old Brazilian man who had 10 surgical procedures to achieve an Asian appearance. The former model has been catapulted into online fame and has been able to shed some light on his interesting decision.

Xiahn, who has been studying in South Korea as a foreign exchange student, commented on the startling amount of surgery among Koreans and pointed out that his procedures are not all too different.

He pointed out that the desire for plastic surgery is quite similar to anyone’s desire to use make up. “Many people change their original look with make up and look completely different so I think it’s the same with surgery,” he explained.

So what sort of surgery did he get done? To alter his eyes, the skin around Xiahn’s eyes was injected with hyaluronic acid to make the eyes appear smaller. The acid in Xiahn’s eyes will only last a couple years. He told the Herald he is not sure yet if he will repeat the injections.


Xiahn’s growing popularity has given him both positive and negative reactions from readers. Despite criticism, it is clear that Xiahn has no regrets about his alterations.

“I think I look handsomer like this. Maybe some people think it’s not, but I think it is,” he said. “I’ve always been shy but now I’m more happy, more confident with myself.”

Most importantly, Xiahn has explained that he is still Brazilian despite the changed look. “I don’t see myself as an Asian. I see myself as something in between,” he said. “I just wanted my eyes to look that way. I don’t feel like I’ve become an Asian or a Korean person”

“There are many mixed Brazilian people,” he continued. “For me, a Korean person looks Brazilian as much as a German person or any other person that has born here.”

Check out before & after photos below!


BEFORE SURGERY:

bef 1

bef 2 bef 3


AFTER SURGERY:

xiahn brazilian to korean surgery with permission

xiahn brazilian to korean surgery with permission

aft 3

aft 4

aft 5aft 6

aft 7

aft 8

 

 

aft 9

aft 10aft 11

 


(Source 1, 2, 3, 4)

Beat the Heat: Frizz-Free Hair

Tis the season for suntans, short shorts and flip flops! There are many things to love about summer, but sometimes the hot weather doesn’t exactly help us look our best. Hot, humid, summer days are great for hitting the beach, but not so much for keeping your hair smooth.

Although people believe in the stereotype that all Asians are blessed with sleek, straight hair, I know from experience that this is not the case.

straight hair

Hair is made up of three layers and the outer layer looks like a shingled roof. When your hair is smooth, the “shingles” lie flat, but when your hair is frizzy the “shingles” are lifted. No one wants to spend their summer having bad hair days, so we’re here to help. Try these steps to keep your hair frizz-free all summer long!


 

1.) Apply a hair mask and relax outside in the sun. The heat opens the hair’s cuticle, and allows the product to sink in more deeply.

Try Carol’s Daughter Monoi Repairing Hair Mask ($32)

hair mask


2.) Don’t brush your hair. Brushing disrupts your hair’s cuticle. Instead of using a brush, use a wide tooth comb, gently combing through any tangles.

Try RickyCare No Frizz Jumbo Detangler Comb ($8)

comb


3.) Don’t over-process your hair. Straightening and blow drying your hair daily can make hair brittle and leads to breakage.

straight


4.) Put moisture back into your hair. Frizzy hair tends to be drier, so use natural oils to replenish the hair of its moisture.

Try Moroccanoil Oil Treatment ($14.80)

oil

 

 


 

The World’s Last Women With Bound Feet

The tradition of foot binding is one that is deeply rooted in Chinese culture. The popularity of this practice continued for nearly 10 centuries and it was not until the early 1900’s that foot binding was officially banned.

As you can imagine, the process of foot binding was quite a painful one. Extremely tight binding was applied to the feet of young girls to prevent the feet from growing. To ensure that the foot stayed small, toes were curled inward and pressed with a great force until the toes were broken. As you can expect, infection and lifelong disabilities were extremely common.

Foot binding was a very obvious way of showing status. The idea was that women from wealthy families could afford the luxury of having their feet bound while women from impoverished families could not participate in the practice because it would restrict their mobility to work. Bound feet became a mark of beauty and many women who did not have their feet bound would not be able to find a husband.

The very few remaining women who had their feet bound are now in their 80s and 90s. British photographer Jo Farrell decided to document and celebrate the lives of these women. She has been photographing and interviewing women since 2006 and is currently raising funds to compile her research into a book, Living History: Bound Feet Women of China. Fastcodesign.com‘s Carey Dunne managed to speak to the photographer:

Though the foot-binding process was excruciating, Farrell says the women she spoke to didn’t express anger over their past. “The women know that having bound feet was a part of normal life at the time. It was what was required of them to find a suitable marriage,” she says. Often, women and their husbands took great pride in their tiny feet–the ideal length for a bound foot was three inches. In many cases, foot-binding led to permanent disabilities, but in the cases of the women Farrell photographed, most of whom are in their 80s and 90s, “they get around on their own just fine. Most of their ailments are to do with old age,” Farrell says. If anything, “they feel somewhat ashamed of their feet, as it is a bygone tradition and does not represent modern ways in China. They are a generation of forgotten women.”

 

Farrell acknowledges that her photographs are shocking and, at times, difficult to look at. However, she points out that we currently have a number of body modification practices which may seem just as bizarre to an outsider’s eye. We have plastic surgery, tattoos, FGM, etc.

“Perhaps her documentation of the painful remains of one culture’s insane beauty standards will help shed light on our own.” Dunne remarks.

fb 1 fb 2 fb 3


fb 4 fb 5 fb 6

 

This Summer’s Guilty Pleasure Must-Read: ‘The Ring & The Crown’

Looking for a good summer read to bring along to the beach? We have just the thing: Filipina American author Melissa de la Cruz, best known for her young adult Blue Blood series, is back with another page-turner.

The Ring & the Crown is touted as a melding of European history and magic, but the book doesn’t focus on magic at all. Rather than a politically-driven fantasy one would expect, the story’s driving force is allll drama, and trust me, there’s a lot of it.

The story shifts between the narratives of four very different girls who lead four very different lives. Marie-Victoria is a sickly princess who wants nothing to do with royalty. Aelwyn is a mage who wishes she were royalty. Ronan is a social-climbing beauty, while Isabelle is willing to do whatever it takes to reclaim her prince.

 

As you can expect, The Ring & the Crown is filled with jealously, betrayal, manipulation and love triangles. Get through the first couple of chapters and you’ll soon find yourself quickly flipping through the pages just to find out who’s sleeping with whom.

So will this make it onto your list of all-time favorite books? We’re not sure. Feminists will be tempted to rip this book apart and there are some plot holes here and there. But should you read this book anyway? You bet. The Ring & the Crown certainly has all the qualifications for a guilty-pleasure read. Besides, it’s summertime. Go ahead and indulge in all the addictive drama. You’ve earned it.

Details Hardcover, $17.99, ringandthecrown.com.

This story was originally published in our Summer 2014 issue. Get your copy here

Forget Cuteness, This 7-Year-Old Will Destroy You

Back in October of last year, we showed you just how cute martial arts can be when performed by little Asian toddlers. The video, most known as “The Cutest Taekwondo Match Ever,”  features two little girls gently swaying their hips and lightly hitting each other to show off their taekwondo skills.

Of course, this isn’t always the case. Take 7-year-old Mahiro-chan as an example. She proves that little Asian girls can be much more than “cute” while performing martial arts. 

Mahiro-chan begins her routine with a vicious scream and as soon as she begins showing off her moves, one thing is clear: this little girl can kick assMahiro-chan moves with an intensity, fierceness and speed that would impress any martial artist.

Mahiro-chan is practicing Kankudai which is also known as Kūshankū (クーシャンク, 公相君) or Kūsankū. It is an open hand form of karate kata that is known to be basic, but very technical and long to perform.

Apparently, it’s also extremely impressive. Check it below and don’t feel too bad about your own fighting skills after seeing this– she can probably beat up all of us.

Beauty Bargain: Self Tanners Under $20

Now that it’s summer everyone wants bronzed, glowing skin. Of course, achieving this golden skin is a lot harder than it looks. For instance, many risk their health in an effort to achieve this summer look.

One of the largest misconceptions within the Asian community is the belief Asian’s can’t get skin cancer. Let’s clear that up right now: Asians are most certainly susceptible to skin cancer. Believing in an immunity is the main cause that many Asians do not discover their cancer until a later stage.

Thankfully, we know another way to achieve bronzed and beautiful skin: self tanners. Self tanners are a cheaper and much less harmful way of getting that gorgeous glow. We’ve found our favorite self-tanners under $20. Check them out below.

 

Jergens
Jergen’s Natural Glow & Protect
($9.99)
This sunless self tanner gives you a gradual glow while protecting you from the sun’s harsh rays.

 

Nature's Glow
Nature’s Gate Glow Lotion
($13.99)

After two or three applications of this product, your skin will glow. Not only is this self tanner paraben free, bur it is highly moisturizing.

 

 

Victoria's Secret
Victoria’s Secret Self Tanning Tinted Spray
($15)
This super fine mist leaves skin with an instant, natural looking tan.

 

Australian Gold
Australian Gold Faces Sunscreen with Instant Bronzer
($9.99)
Self tanner, bronzer, and SPF 45 sunscreen all in one, this product is a triple threat.

 

Top 5 Most Extreme Cases of Cosmetic Surgery

Cosmetic surgery seems to be the debate of the year. Half our readers believe that we should all just accept our physical appearance while the other half believe people should not be judged for their decisions.

Regardless of where you stand on this issue, plastic surgery rates are growing fast in Asia. After all, a double eyelid procedure is a common graduation gift given to high school girls. As you can imagine, we’ve seen quite a bit of instances where people alter their looks to better fit society’s standard of beauty, but some cases are more intense than others. The following are the top 5 most extreme cases of cosmetic surgery that we’ve come across.

 


eps 3
1) Woman gets surgery to look like Miranda Kerr.
“On a recent episode of Martian X-Files, a Korean reality TV show that spotlights eccentric and unique non-celebrities, one of the guests was a woman who underwent plastic surgery to look like Australian model Miranda Kerr.” (Read the full story here)


eps 2
2) Twins sisters look unrecognizable after appearing on plastic surgery show.

“The purpose of this show is to “help those with special circumstances or people who are too ugly to feel confident in their life.” The participant facing “special circumstances” will have their plastic surgery sponsored by the television program and audiences follow along during the transformation.” (Read the full story here) 


eps 4
3) “Hand lifts” for engagement ring selfies.

Note: We realize that this is invasive surgery and not plastic surgery, but it makes it onto the list since hand selfies qualify as an extreme justification for cosmetic alteration. (Read the full story here) 


eps 1
4) Television show reverses excessive surgery… with more surgery. 

“Back to My Face features contestants who have had 10 or more procedures done and may have some regrets about their decisions.” (Read the full story here) 



brazil-plastic-surgery
5) A Brazilian man gets plastic surgery to look Korean

“A 25-year-old model has had 10 surgical procedures on his eyes to achieve an Asian appearance. Originally blonde and blue-eyed, the man who goes by “Xiahn” became fascinated by plastic surgery while studying in South Korea as a foreign exchange student.” (Read the full story here) 

 

Kina Grannis: A New Sound & A New Look For Her Latest Album

Story by Ada Tseng.

It’s been half a decade since Kina Grannis began writing her 2010 debut album Stairwells, which featured songs that were practiced, appropriately, in the stairwells of the University of Southern California, where she attended college. Now 28, she’s gone through much personal growth, spurred by everything from the tragedy of her grandfather’s passing to the joy of a new marriage to her frequent musical collaborator, Jesse Epstein. These life experiences gave her the courage to write songs about topics she may have shied away from in the past. She also began working with producer Matt Hales (also known as Aqualung) to experiment with her music sonically.

In the days leading up to her new album release this past May, Grannis uploaded a series of “Making the Album” videos onto her YouTube page, where she let her large and supportive online fan base glimpse behind the scenes, from Hales’ unique instruments (the glockenspiel is featured on the track “This Far”) to her pet corn snakes, Hubert Cumberdale and Jeremy Fisher, who often joined them in the studio. Now that the album’s out, we follow up with the Japanese American hapa.


Audrey Magazine: Why the title Elements?

Kina Grannis: I was looking over the titles [of my songs] one day — “The Fire,” “Dear River,” “Write it in the Sky,” etc. — and the word “elements” came to mind. The idea of the basic elements of life really struck me. To me, that’s what this album is all about: family, love and loss. Beginnings and endings, past and future.

AM: You wrote a lot of the songs in a cabin in the woods. Have you secluded yourself in nature to write before, or was this a new experiment?

KG: I’d actually never done this in the past. A sophomore album is an interesting thing. For the first album — in my case, Stairwells — you basically have your pick from all the songs you’ve written in your life, up to that point. And before Stairwells, I had all the time in the world to be writing. Since then, however, I’ve been touring and posting videos almost nonstop, so by the time I needed to start working on the new album, I had very few songs to start from. I started doing these retreats as a way to get out of my normal routine, connect to myself and nature, and really give myself a safe place to start flexing those creative muscles again. Thankfully, it ended up being a really natural and inspiring way for me to get back to writing.

AM: Can you talk about what inspired the song “Winter,” about the impending ending of a relationship?

KG: Strangely enough, “Winter” was inspired by a vase of dead flowers. I found them in one of the cabins I stayed in, and they were so beautiful, but there was something really sad about them to me. Soon enough, I found myself singing the chorus. This song really hit me hard emotionally when I was writing it — when I realized I wasn’t singing about the flowers at all.

AM: The song “My Own” features your two sisters. What was it like growing up with musical siblings, and how did that collaboration come about?

KG: My parents had a lot of instruments in the house [when we were] growing up. We had a grand piano, and under it, there were about 15 different assorted instruments, from violins to recorders to an accordion to a Japanese koto. Most of them didn’t really get touched by us, but just having them around led me to really experiment with music as a kid. My sisters and I used to sing together all the time — usually Disney songs, Christmas carols or whatever our favorite albums were. “My Own” came about one day when I was thinking about my family — how they are so unique and amazing and entirely mine.

AM: Looking back, was there a moment when you realized music was something you wanted to pursue more seriously?

KG: Before I even started taking singing seriously, and before it ever occurred to me to touch a guitar, I had that moment. I was at an annual Christmas concert when I was about 15. Something struck me so deeply, watching all these people standing in front of us and singing their hearts out, that I basically ran out of the concert balling. I hid in the bathroom for the rest of the night trying to figure out what was wrong, and that’s when it hit me. I felt if I didn’t make singing a main focus in my life, that I was going to be missing out on who I was.

AM: By the way, we love your new look! Was this just a fun change, or does it feel like the start of a different phase in your life?

KG: It definitely coincided with a new chapter in my life. I had been touring around, living a Stairwells-driven life for the better part of three years. When I got home after the last tour, it just felt different. There were also a lot of other significant changes going on in my life at the time. I felt the need to start this chapter fresh and uninhibited, and that’s when I said goodbye to 19 inches of hair.

This story was originally published in our Summer 2014 issue. Get your copy here