The Daily SHAG | EXO For Ivy Club Photoshoot [VIDEO INCLUDED]

Recently, 17-year-old singer/songwriter Lorde was cyberbullied for her “nerdy Asian boyfriend,” James Lowe. Lowe was met with every negative Asian male stereotype in the book.

Situations like this is precisely the reason Audrey created the Daily SHAG (Smoking Hot Asian Guy) to prove that, contrary to popular belief, Asian men in all shapes and sizes can be desirable.

Who better to portray this than K-pop’s current dreamboats, EXO? The 12 member boy band, which consist of Korean and Chinese members, clearly bring an array of looks, personalities and body types. They easily prove that Asian men are perfectly capable of being hot.

Ivy Club has already used EXO to advertise many of their looks and thankfully, they decided to use EXO’s boyish charm for their Winter 2013-2014 line.

The boys are accompanied by actress Seo Yea Ji while they make school uniforms look more attractive than we could have ever imagined.

Click below for some Daily SHAG pictures you’re sure to enjoy. As an added bonus, we’ve included the behind-the-scenes footage of this swoon-worthy photoshoot. And if you still find yourself lost and unable to distinguish the members, have no fear. Check out The Ultimate Guide to EXO.

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Zhang Ziyi Wins Best Actress at 56th Asia-Pacific Film Festival (And Looks Stunning)

On December 16th, the 56th Asia-Pacific Film Festival Award Ceremony was held in Macau at The Venetian.

Wong Kar-wai’s much anticipated film The Grandmaster proved that it was worth the anticipation by taking home two awards that night: Best Cinematography and Best Actress.

Zhang Ziyi, one of the top actresses in China’s film industry and best known for her roles in the Oscar-winning films Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon and Memoirs of a Geisha, was well-deserving of Best Actress Award. She was also awarded Best Actress at the recent Golden Horse Awards for the same role in The Grandmaster.

Zhang Ziyi plays the strong-willed Gong Er who learned Kung Fu in secret when women were not allowed to. Zhang Ziyi admits that she simply could not say no to Wong Kar-wai, but certainly did not expect the film to take three years to shoot.

Clearly, that decision was worth it. The actress did more than stun audiences with her acting, she also took everyone’s breath away with her red-carpet look to accept the award. Zhang wore a stunning Armani Privé Spring 2013 red latex bustier mermaid gown coded in strands of sequins.

Check out more of her stunning look below.

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Comic Tackles Misconceptions About Feminism

These days, we get the striking feeling that feminism has become a misunderstood concept.

Time and time again, I’ve come across individuals who associate feminism as the hatred of men. Thats it. Apparently there is no actual and logical reason behind why women are feminists aside from the desire for bra-burnings, anger, and the shared hatred of all males.

Even worse, “feminism” has gained some negative connotations. Suddenly, women who are feminists are viewed as bad girlfriends and bad wives. As a result, even women who feel strongly for their rights as an individual do not want to be associated with the description “feminist.”

These misunderstandings are exactly why 20-year-old Katarzyna Babis designed a comic to show why feminism exists.

“I would like to take away the bad rep of the word ‘feminism,’ broaden the awareness of the actual agenda of this movement, and of the need for discussion about the way in which women are treated in our society,” Babis told HuffPost.

Her comic portrays the double standards that women often face and the judgements they receive no matter what lifestyle choice they make.

“[I wanted to start a] discussion about the problem with the way women are perceived by the society, about huge and often contradictory expectations that are put on their shoulders,” said Babis. “In this reality, a woman’s body doesn’t belong to her –- it is either a public property, intended only to be admired, or a source of sin, shame and guilt.”

As Asian American women, we are no strangers to expectations and judgements. Dressing a certain way or even choosing a certain career path can trigger a number of judgements from our very own family. This is exactly the thing that Babis portrays in her comic below.

 

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The Lylas: Much More Than JUST The Sisters of Bruno Mars

Story by Jimmy Lee. 

There is nothing in life quite like family. Your parents are the source of your being, and it is family members who can offer support and comfort, unconditionally. But those same people can also cause stress and frustration to the point where you wish you were dead. And no matter how much they piss you off or cause you grief — like the umpteenth time they nag you about being single into your late 30s — there’s no escape from them, because they will always be family.

For the Hernandezes of Honolulu, there is something else that binds them: music. And there’s one fortunate son who’s made quite a name for himself doing just that: Peter Hernandez, better known as Bruno Mars. But now his four sisters — Jaime, Tiara, Tahiti and Presley — want to demonstrate just how deeply the musical talent runs in their brood. Together, they’re The Lylas, and their journey to hopefully becoming the next pop stars in the family is documented in a new non-scripted series that premiered on WEtv in early November, simply titled The Lylas.

Now, before you start to roll your eyes about another gaggle of girls from the same family having their lives captured on camera, this quartet of women had some of the same thoughts. “Before we signed up to do a reality show, we weren’t 100 percent behind it. There’s a stigma with reality shows,” says eldest sister Jaime. “Are people going to laugh at us? Is it going to flop? Is it going to do well? Are we going to take it seriously?”

Watching the first episode, you’ll recognize some of the tropes that characterize these types of shows. First off, the four daughters of Peter Hernandez, Sr., and Bernadette Bayot certainly all have the prerequisite telegenic looks. And there is plenty of bickering to go along with the alcohol consumption.

But tragedy would befall that would change their outlook on the reality show experience: their mother, also known as Bernie, died this past June of a brain aneurysm in the midst of taping. “We’re so grateful to have documented our last few special moments with our mother,” says Jaime, “that all of [the concerns of doing a reality show] are out the window.”

The series premieres with the sisters coping with their loss, and then flashes back in time as they prepare to move from Hawaii to Los Angeles to pursue their musical dreams, with their mother’s support. There are some chilling moments as you hear Bernie say, “I’m just a baby star-maker,” as well as her making references to life and death.

As a child, Bernie and her family emigrated from the Philippines to Hawaii in 1968. She, along with some of her siblings, grew up to be a performer, including a hula dancer, as part of Honolulu’s many shows. That is where she met Peter Hernandez, who is of Puerto Rican and Eastern European Jewish descent, who is also an entertainer.

“When [our father] met our mom, he taught her how to sing. My dad cannot sing at all,” says Jaime. “But he’s an amazing producer. He can arrange harmonies beautifully.”

One of the projects in Honolulu Peter started was a revue called the Love Notes. “My mom ran the girl group, and he ran the guy group,” says Jaime. “Shows [and our parents’ rehearsals] were a part of our lives. For us, that was like going to soccer practice.”

“Have you seen The Sound Of Music?,” Tahiti chimes in, the second youngest sister and a mother of two boys. “That’s what our family was like, minus the whole Nazi thing. [The Von Trapp family is] what we aspired to be.”

Talking to all four sisters at once over a conference call is a daunting experience. They have fun at this writer’s expense when asked for their ages (in their 20s and 30s is all they would reveal; Presley’s the youngest). They certainly gab like sisters, interrupting one another and finishing sentences. And soon enough, the barbs are flying as they all poke fun of each other, even while they reminisce about their mother.

“My mom could dance hula, she could boogie dance,” says Tahiti. “My mom was the best dancer. Yes, Jaime, better than you. Way better than you.”

“I agree,” adds Tiara.

Jaime’s good-natured response: “Everyone, shut up!”

With music such a huge factor in their lives, perhaps it was inevitable that the sisters would form their own girl group (the sixth sibling, Eric, is the drummer in Bruno’s band). The Lylas, which stands for “love you like a sister,” came about when a nonprofit charity organization that Jaime founded, called 4 Mama Earth, was going to put out a benefit record to raise money for an orphanage in the Philippines. The sisters wrote a song called “Headed Home.”

“It’s all about going back to your roots and never forgetting where you came from,” says Jamie. “It was going to be a ‘We Are The World’ type of song, and we had a bunch of [Filipino American] artists on the song. And I called the girls and was like, ‘We need to do this together. Let’s just do a little bridge or a hook on the song.’ So we did, and it was just magic in the studio. And then we were like, ‘let’s work on another song,’ and so we started writing together and recording and it just sort of happened like that.”

They’ve released one single thus far, “Come Back,” a song about realizing you’ve dumped the wrong man. While it may not speak directly to Jaime, a married mother of two, she says, “but as sisters, when one person goes through something, we all kind of go through it together. It might not apply to all of us at the same time, but it applies to us at some point in our lives. When you date one of us, you date all of us.”

“It’s a blessing and a curse,” adds Tahiti.

“Mostly it’s a curse,” Tiara quickly responds.

Being related to Bruno Mars, too, has both positives and negatives. “It’s difficult because a lot of people think, ‘Bruno’s their brother, so it’s just going to be so easy for them,’” says Presley. “Actually, it makes things a lot harder because we have a lot more barriers to break. We have to get out of being ‘Bruno’s sisters.’”

“It’s been helpful in that it’s gotten us in the door,” says Tahiti, “but it doesn’t take us anywhere, really. We’ve got to do that ourselves.”

They are already making an impression on people, especially through social media. It was their fans who started urging them via Twitter to do a television series. “I think they’ve seen the chemistry that me and my sisters have together,” says Tahiti. “And everyone after that petitioned, ‘please have a reality show; open the doors and let us into your guys’ world.’”

Of course, mixing family and business can be a volatile combination. When asked if they like working together as sisters, Tahiti jokes, “I got to go, my phone’s cutting out.”

But, ultimately, just like family, being in a group together “has its ups and downs,” says Jaime. “But if we weren’t sisters, I could see why girl groups break up. It’s not easy. Just because we’re sisters doesn’t mean egos aren’t involved. We do fight. But at the end of the day, we’re still sisters, and we have to get over it. It makes us closer.”

 

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This story was originally published in our Winter 2013-14 issue. Get your copy here

 

Asian Guys Respond To Cyberbullying Over Lorde’s Asian Boyfriend

Last week, much to our dislike, New Zealand singer/songwriter Lorde faced what can only be described as racist cyberbullying.

Rumors began to spread that the 17-year-old singer called Justin Beiber and the members of One Direction “ugly.” As a result, Beiber fans and One Direction fans chose to retaliate. Their main focus? Lorde’s 24-year-old rumored boyfriend, James Lowe.

The worst part about all this is that the cyberbullies chose to use some of the worst stereotypes about Asian males. Although he did nothing to deserve the insults, Lowe was called ugly, scrawny, nerdy, Psy gone wrong, and a number of other derogatory terms.

While many Asians expressed anger about the racist remarks, comedian Andrew Fung tried to focus on some of the positives of this situation.

“I was like, ‘Oh, he’s a skinny Asian guy! It’s not like he’s a buff K-Pop guy,'” said Fung. “That’s very cool.”

Fun pointed out that the situation would be much less controversial had Lorde been dating a more “conventionally attractive Asian-American male,” but is glad that a “nerdy Asian guy is in the spotlight.”

Fung and his brother David expressed their full views on the situation through the following video. Though it was uploaded less than a week ago, the video has already gathered over 66,000 views on YouTube.

Another Video of Yerin Park Eating.. And We Still Can’t Look Away

There is no denying that cute Asian babies have become viral sensations. While some popular fads are questionable, we completely understand why adorable babies are irresistible to squeal over.

On the very top of our list is none other than Yerin Park. Her chubby cheeks, habit of smiling, and squeal-worthy facial expressions catapulted her into social media fame. Her father, a software engineer, claims that he first began videotaping Yerin to try and show her grandparents how she was growing. As it turns out, the rest of the world wanted to watch as well.

With the rise in popularity of gifs, one simply could not scroll through tumblr without seeing a laughing Yerin. Now, there are multiple facebooks, blogs, and channels dedicated to Yerin Park.

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Now, Yerin is joined by an adorable younger sister named Yeseo. Although Yerin is no longer a baby, she is still a captivating young toddler.

Earlier today, a video was uploaded of Yerin eating a meal. As many of us know, Yerin is a rather picky eater so her parents encourage her by pretending her food is her friend and wants to meet her. Sure, it makes no sense to us, but we must admit that we couldn’t take our eyes off the two cuties. Check it out for yourself.

 

Controversial Fitness Mom Opens Up About Her Struggle With Bulimia

Most readers have made it loud and clear that they are tired of hearing about Maria Kang, the 32-year-old mother of three who caused a social media uproar when she posted a photo of her toned body on to Facebook captioned “What’s your excuse?”

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Half the readers are tired about Kang’s inability to “get over herself.” The other half  seem tired hearing about how upset everyone is over her “inspirational success.” Whether you support her or not, Kang has made it clear that she is not ready to leave the spotlight and yearns to tell both her controversial success story and her story of struggle.

Recently Kang opened up to MailOnline about the other side of her story: her struggle with bulimia. Kang has been called a bully for being insensitive about the struggles that other women have to endure, but Kang argues that her weight-loss journey was a battle as well.

Kang claims that she was always considered “chunky” and often compared herself to her leaner sisters and supermodels in magazines. In her early 20’s, the self-conscious Kang suffered from Bulimia. Her weight fluctuated dramatically and at one point, her 5ft 4in frame weighed 152lbs. Kang admits to binging and purging on sweets two to three times almost every day of the week.
“I used disordered eating to fill an empty void,” Kang explains. “It was worse when I was feeling anxious. People often call bulimia the “good girl drug” because we don’t do drugs or drink alcohol we just abuse food.”

I felt like I had no control over my  mind and I had such self-defeating thoughts. I felt a variety of emotions, sadness, guilt, emptiness.”

Kang’s life finally took a turn for the better when she made the conscious decision to “start loving herself.” Additionally, the entrance of her husband, David Casler, into her life truly pushed her to take care of her health. When she became pregnant with her first son, she found her new motivation.

“I had to let go of being perfect,” she said. ‘When I became pregnant with my first child I was like “Wow this is what my body is really made for.”

After promising to eat in a more healthy manner, Kang was able to slim down to 125lbs after birth. She was able to get back into shape after two more children. She attributes this to having a toned foundation and advises other women to be fit before pregnancy so that losing weight becomes more manageable.

To maintain her current body, she does 30 to 60 minutes of strength training and cardio a day. Additionally, she likes to eat protein and carbohydrates at each meal.

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Celebrity Style Guide: Padma Lakshmi Accessorizes with Leigh & Luca New York

We know what you’re thinking. She’s gorgeous. But aside from her beauty, Padma Lakshmi is quite talented. The 43-year-old Indian American is a cookbook author, actress, model and television host.

Known for her award-winning cookbooks, Lakshmi has been the host of the reality show Top Chef since 2006.

Here, Lakshmi is seen taking a break from hosting to relax on a beach in Miami. What caught our eye was her gorgeous way of accessorizing her scarf from Leigh & Luca New York. The official Leigh & Luca New York website describes their pieces as:

Highly addictive expressions of individual style that beg to be worn in a variety of ways. LEIGH & LUCA’s alluring collection captures the essence of ancient spiritual cloth with modern motifs and patterns, season after season. The relevant and trent-driven designs are sensuous, edgy and modern, capturing that downtown vibe with uptown notes of luxury and style.

 

 

Creative Director Susann Luca travels the world looking for inspiration and more and is inspired by the less structured garments that stem from exotic cultures such as Asia and Africa. Each piece is woven on antique wooden looms using the highest quality cashmeres, silks and cottons, and can take up to a full day to make. Embellished with innovative hand embroidery, printing, and flocking techniques, the oversized scarves are made with love in Inner Mongolia.

Utilizing the color contrast of the scarf with her bikini top, Lakshmi wraps the scarf around her waist like a sarong. Although it may be a bit too cold for you to venture off to the beach during the winter time, there are many other ways to wear Leigh & Luca New York scarves.

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For more information, visit the official Leigh & Luca New York website.

AUDREY’S WOMEN OF INFLUENCE | Komal Ahmad, CEO of Feeding Forward

Story by Ada Tseng. Photo by Deborah Nagai-Cromer.

Like many children of immigrants who have worked hard to provide for their families, Komal Ahmad remembers being taught not to waste food at her daily family dinners. “It was always like, ‘Finish your food!’” says Ahmad, imitating her parents’ stern Pakistani accents. “‘People are starving in Africa, and you’re not even finishing your food? Who do you think you are?’”

Ahmad, the 23-year-old CEO of the nonprofit organization Feeding Forward, grew up in the suburbs of Las Vegas, where homelessness was neatly tucked away. But when she began to study at the University of California, Berkeley, the problem was impossible to ignore. Just across the street from Crossroads, the university’s popular dining hall that served much of the student population, was People’s Park, a public park that acts as a daytime sanctuary for Berkeley’s large homeless population.

“As college students, our eyes are bigger than our stomachs, and there were various initiatives to try and reduce food waste, like getting rid of trays so you only take what your hands can carry,” says Ahmad, who graduated in 2012 with degrees in international health and development and global poverty and practice. “But at the same time, it was frustrating when I asked the dining managers what they did with the excess food, and they said that, due to liability reasons, they can’t donate it, so they have no choice but to throw it away. And it was so absurd to me, because I felt like they could just walk across the street, and I guarantee the homeless people at People’s Park won’t sue you.”

While for many of us, these moral frustrations are fleeting, Ahmad made it her mission to do something about it. She’s always been devoted to public service (Gandhi’s “Be the change that you wish to see in the world” is a quote she lives by), and as a naval medical officer for the U.S. Navy during her four years at Berkeley, she deployed to Tanzania to help launch a mobile HIV clinic during the summer after her second year in college. What she found was that treating people was one thing, but without greater public health education and effective systems in place, patients would be back in a week with the same problems. After her return to the United States, she felt helpless, unsure whether any of the initiatives she started would be continued — and knowing that, as a college student, there was no way she could realistically go back to Tanzania to sustain them herself. She realized that even if her goals were global, she needed to start local.

So she turned to her own neighborhood. While she was skeptical about giving money to Berkeley’s homeless, she was always happy to give food. And when she would periodically strike up conversations with them, she realized that many of the homeless people around campus were former veterans in their mid-20s and 30s who had served their country but were now on the streets.

She soon discovered that the ingrained concern about liability that was keeping Cal Dining (and many other organizations) from donating excess food was based on a misconception. In 1996, President Clinton passed the Federal Bill Emerson Good Samaritan Food Donation Act, that has been renewed since, which allows individuals and corporations that donate food to a non-profit organization in good faith to be free of any liability as long as they don’t engage in any gross negligence.

Once the Cal Dining managers understood this, they were quickly onboard to donate their extra food to people in need. By starting the organization Bare Abundance (a play on words referring to the Cal Bears), Ahmad mobilized her fellow Berkeley students to volunteer to redistribute food from campus dining halls and events. She essentially started a movement that spread to other universities also interested in reducing food waste and eventually co-founded the Food Recovery Network, an overarching nonprofit that united all the campus organizations. By the end of this December, Ahmad expects that 100 universities across the United States will be fully functional with food recovery programs embedded in their dining halls.

“There is more than enough food to feed the entire population over three times, but the problem is that we have an inequitable distribution of food,” says Ahmad. “And it’s staggering that even in a wealthy and powerful nation like the U.S., we still have so many people begging for it.”

While giving surplus food that would otherwise go to waste to people who would otherwise go hungry seems self-explanatory, facilitating this trade is not without its struggles. Often, once restaurants are relieved of their liability concerns, they are quickly onboard, but it’s the receiving organizations that are skeptical of the good will. Connecting with charities and soup kitchens on a personal level was necessary to build familiarity and trust in the beginning, and the next crucial step involved figuring out how to streamline the process in order to respect the time of workers and volunteers. Ahmad remembers one day when the Cal Dining manager had called, alerting her of a university catering event that no one showed up to, leaving 500 sandwiches that needed to be picked up within two hours. “We’re dealing with perishable foods here, so I drove there, loaded up my car, and immediately started calling a list of agencies everywhere from Oakland to Berkeley to Richmond,” says Ahmad. “One-third of them didn’t answer their phones, one-third of them said they didn’t need food today, and the last third said, ‘Thanks, I’ll take 20 sandwiches,’ which left me thinking, ‘Great, but now I have 480 sandwiches left!’”

At that moment, it became clear that even though she wanted to do something good for society, no one has six hours to drive around aimlessly with 500 sandwiches. She yearned for an iPhone app that would automatically locate the supply and demand for food and link the two sources together. Though computer science was not her forte, she sought out programmers who would help her create a program that would steer the market. This past January, Ahmad and her team placed fourth out of 88 teams at Foursquare Hackathon 2013 and won a mentorship that helped them develop their software platform and matching system. Feeding Forward, an online and mobile interface that facilitates communication between food service organizations and charities in the San Francisco Bay Area, was born.

“Now, say you have 100 sandwiches to donate,” says Ahmad. “You can go into the mobile app, upload a picture, list a pick-up time, give your contact, and when you post, you enter a virtual marketplace. The algorithm matches the amount and type of food you have with the needs of soup kitchens and homeless shelters and matches you with a nearby volunteer who’s available to deliver at that particular time. The volunteer confirms the food’s been received, the receiving agency sends back pictures showing the donors the people they’ve fed, and that’s Feeding Forward.”

Officially launched in April 2013, Feeding Forward’s food recovery programs have altogether recovered more than 250,000 pounds of food to date. Earlier this year, they won the prize for outstanding social entrepreneurship venture at Innovation Alley, a pop-up tech area at the Jewish Community Federation’s Israel in the Gardens event in San Francisco.

Now that Ahmad is confident the organization can make a sustainable impact, she’s passionate about accelerating and expanding their movement. “The Bay Area is our case study. Our goal is to implement Feeding Forward in cities nationally, and from there, I’ve already initiated conversations with other countries, in Hong Kong and Israel, so we can eventually go global,” says Ahmad. “Because ultimately, inequitable distribution is a global issue in both developing and developed countries.”

For more information about how to support and donate to Feeding Forward, visit Feedingforward.org or their Facebook page

This story was originally published in our Winter 2013-14 issue. Get your copy here

Asians in Most Iconic Feminist Moments of 2013

Yesterday, PolyMic.com released a story titled “28 Most Iconic Feminist Moments of 2013.” We’re not going to lie, we definitely jumped and cheered for many of these moments.

Of course, we were proud that these individuals helped women take a much-needed step forward, but what really caught our eye was the amount of Asians that made their way onto this list. We decided to take a closer look at these women.

Needless to say, we are awfully proud of the Asians who took part in the most iconic feminist moment of 2013. To check out the full list, click here.

 


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1. Bollywood Actress Slammed Down a Reporter Who Criticized Her Views on the Patriarchy

When a female reporter asked Mallika Sherawat to defend her comment that India is “regressive and depressive,” she ripped her apart. “As a woman, I should lie about the state of women that’s in our country?” the actress replied. When the reporter wouldn’t give it up, the Bollywood actress just started dropping knowledge: “With female feticide, infanticide happening on an almost daily basis; with gang rapes making the headlines of almost every newspaper; with honor killings …” Her response came only a few weeks after the head of India’s Central Bureau of Investigation said if rape can’t be prevented, it should be enjoyed.

So who is this fiesty woman who dropped some knowledge? That would be none other than Indian actress and model Mallika Sherawat. Quite like her actual personality, Sherawat is known for playing characters with a bold attitude. Currently, the 37-year-old actress is trying to cross over to Hollywood. Thus far, she has been in two Hollywood films, Hisss and Politics of Love, and was featured in a Bruno Mars parody video. 

Because of her time spent in Los Angeles, as well as her comment that India is regressive for women, Sherewat received a handful of negative criticism for those who felt like she did not like India. In the following video, Sherewat says exactly whats she meant by that and calls attention to a number of very important issues.

The description also calls attention to Central Bureau of Investigation chief Ranjit Sinha who faced a lot of heat for comparing rape to gambling and stating “if you can’t prevent it, enjoy it..” Read more on his controversial statement here.

 


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2. International Outrage After Gang Rape in India Sparked Historic Change in Laws

After the fatal, brutal gang rape of a student caused international uproar and mass protests, the Indian government took drastic action. On March 19, the parliament passed an anti-rape bill that doubled the punishment for rapists. “Under the changes, the minimum sentence for gang rape, rape of a minor, rape by policemen or a person in authority will be doubled to 20 years and can be extended to life without parole,” BBC reported.

This set the stage for a global conversation about sexual assault and the persistence of rape culture across borders.

 

According to the Atlantic, three woman in India are raped every hour and yet the country has one of the lowest conviction rates. Thankfully, the discrepancy has been given a little more (deserved) attention. The new anti-rape bull includes double the amount of punishment for rapists. The minimum sentence is now 20 years and can be extended to life without parole. Additionally, voyeurism and stalking is now punishable by law.


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3. GoldieBlox Proved That Girls Can Be More Than Princesses

Who knew feminism has so much viral potential? For decades, we’ve been targeting women and girls with pink princess junk, but as it turns out, telling females they can be anything can also work! When the good folks at GoldieBlox noticed that women only make up 11% of engineers in the world, they decided to reverse that trend. “By designing a construction toy from the female perspective, we aim to disrupt the pink aisle and inspire the future generation of female engineers,” a statement on the company’s website says. “We believe there are a million girls out there who are engineers. They just might not know it yet. We think GoldieBlox can show them the way.” Well, I know what to give my niece for Christmas this year!

 

Debbie Sterling, a female engineer, realized that part of the reason many girls don’t grow up considering the engineering field has a lot to do with our childhood. Young girls don’t come home from the toy store with legos, lincoln blocks, or robots you to be built build for battle. They go home with dress-up barbies, build-a-bears, and fake make-up kits. Although there is absolutely nothing wrong with these toys, the problem is simply that the opportunity to go out and explore is not available. Many young girls never considered being an engineer simply because they were never programmed to have any sort of interest in the field. Sterling decided to change that.

She described GoldieBlox as “a series of interactive books + construction toys starring Goldie, a curious girl with a love of engineering.”

 


Screen Shot 2013-12-12 at 4.45.10 PM4. Mindy Kaling Exposed One of the Worst Double Standards for Women

In an interview with Parade magazine, Mindy Kaling made a brilliant point about the assumptions we make about women. “I always get asked, ‘Where do you get your confidence?’ I think people are well meaning, but it’s pretty insulting. Because what it means to me is, ‘You, Mindy Kaling, have all the trappings of a very marginalized person. You’re not skinny, you’re not white, you’re a woman. Why on earth would you feel like you’re worth anything?'”

Mindy Kaling is on our list of The Worlds 15 Most Followed Asian Female Celebrities on Twitter and happens to be one of Audrey’s cover girls. She talked more about her confidence and explained where it came from. “As confident as I feel,” she explained, “it takes an almost comically confident person to be able to say that they were destined to be in movies and television. I don’t think I was destined, but I think I am of the personality type where the rejection or odds of something doesn’t scare me. Maybe it was because my mom moved to Africa at 20 by herself, but there’s a certain fearlessness that runs in my family for things where there’s absolutely no reason to believe that it should work out. I get that from my parents.”

Check out the cover photo below.

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5. Malala Made a Groundbreaking (and Very Feminist) Speech at the United Nations

On July 12, Malala Yousafzai celebrated her 16th birthday by delivering her first speech since she survived a bullet to the head by the Taliban. Her words inspired millions around the world, especially after she made some enlightening feminist statements like, “We cannot all succeed when half of us are held back.”

The teenage girl’s courage and grace left us all (including Jon Stewart) speechless. TIME magazine got it wrong because in our hearts, she was definitely the Person of the Year.

 

If you don’t know who Malala Yousafzai is, then you ought to learn up. Malala was only a young girl when she became an activist for rights to education and rights for women. At the young age of 11, she began blogging about her life under Taliban rule. This was so powerful that in 2009, a New York Times documentary was filmed about her life.

Her actions were seen as unacceptable and in 2012, Malala was shot in the head and neck by Taliban gunman in an attempt to murder her. The strong young lady survived and continues to fight for what she believes in.


its your fault
6.  This Awesome Rape Prevention Video Parody From India Traveled ‘Round the World

This parody video created by All India Bakchod went viral around the world for its honest look at the worst persisting stereotypes about sexual assault. It features women using humor and sarcasm to point out the absurdities of rape culture. Given that a recent United Nations report found that two women are raped every hour in India, this video couldn’t come at a better time. Its reception was positive. The filmmakers told Al Jazeera that within a couple of days, they were already flooded with requests to translate the video into Hindi in order to reach a wider audience.

 

Known for her films Zindagi Na Milegi Dobara and Yeh Jawaani Hai Deewani, Bollywood actress Kalki Koechlin joined forces with TV presenter Juhi Pandey for the video AIB365: It’s Your Fault. This short is a brilliantly done satire on rape and the blame that is often placed on women.The video was made in response to the high levels of violence against women in India and the misconceptions over who is at fault.

The video begins with Koechlin saying, “Ladies, do you think rape is something men do out of a desire for control, empowered by years of patriarchy? You’ve clearly been misled by the notion that women are people too. Because let’s face it, rape is your fault.” If the satiric tone is not yet obvious, Koechlin goes on to say, “Scientific studies suggest that women who wear skirts are the leading cause of rape. Do you know why? Because men have eyes.”

The video continues by showing various articles of clothing which are unacceptable for women to wear, from skirts to a fully-covered astronaut suit. The video points out that women are to blame for rape regardless of what they wear simply because they are women.  Watch this entertaining and enlightening video below.