Can Hari Kondabolu Stay In the Top Five, Plus Dan Choi and Cary Fukunaga Join the Pack

 

We’re collecting votes until Tuesday, August 25 at 11:59PM PST to see who we should pursue for our 2016 Haikus with Hotties calendar, and we’re giving you Daily Hot Five charts so you can see how your hottie is doing and determine when it’s time to rally up the fanbase.

 

 

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Infographic below updated daily:

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Haikus With Hotties Nomination #6: Cary Fukunaga

 

In case you hadn’t heard, we successfully funded a Kickstarter in less than 3 days on August 18, 2015, and now we’re making a 2016 calendar out of our series Haikus with Hotties. We have room for 5 more hot guys in the calendar, but we need your help choosing. We started with 10 dream picks and allowed nominations, and today is the last day to vote!

The votes not only tell us who you want us to pursue, but they make it easier for us to convince them to participate if they know that their fans really, really, really want them to be in the calendar.

Our sixth nomination is Cary Fukunaga:
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Cary Joji Fukunaga mades waves for his hotness after he won the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Directing for a Drama Series for the first season of HBO’s True Detective. Fans were equally impressed with his body (of work) and his ability to pull off perfectly symmetrical man braids. Fukunaga burst into the scene with his debut 2009 feature Sin Nombre, which earned him a nomination for Best Director at the Independent Spirit Awards. Since then, he’s directed 2011’s adaptation of Jane Eyre, True Detective, and this October, his latest film Beasts of No Nation will release simultaneously in theaters and online. Beasts of No Nation, which he wrote and directed, is a war story about a West African child soldier based on 2005 novel of the same name by Uzodinma Iweala starring Idris Elba.

 

To vote, follow us on Twitter @audreymagazine and tweet at us with “My vote for the ultimate hottie goes to Cary Fukunaga @audreymagazine #HaikuswithHotties http://kck.st/1N8wnGK


 

Here are the list of people you can vote for:

 

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Also, the campaign is still running until September 13, so if you want to pre-order or check out one of the other reward perks, go for it!

 

 

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Haikus with Hotties Nomination #5: Dan Choi

 

In case you hadn’t heard, we successfully funded a Kickstarter in less than 3 days on August 18, 2015, and now we’re making a 2016 calendar out of our series Haikus with Hotties. We have room for 5 more hot guys in the calendar, but we need your help choosing. We started with 10 dream picks and allowed nominations, and today is the last day to vote!

The votes not only tell us who you want us to pursue, but they make it easier for us to convince them to participate if they know that their fans really, really, really want them to be in the calendar.

Our fifth nomination is Dan Choi:

danchoi1 danchoi2 Lieutenant Dan Choi who has just been di

Dan Choi served in the United States Army in Iraq from 2006-7, and he became an LGBT icon for the movement to repeal America’s Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell policy, which forbade LGBT service members from serving openly. After he came out on The Rachel Maddow Show in 2009, he was promptly discharged, and he penned an open letter to President Obama and the US Congress: “[It’s] a slap in the face to me. It is a slap in the face to my soldiers, peers and leaders who have demonstrated that an infantry unit can be professional enough to accept diversity, to accept capable leaders, to accept skilled soldiers.”

Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell was repealed in 2010, with Choi in attendance. Since then he’s spoken out at numerous LGBT rights events, often getting arrested for his protests, and he is the subject of a documentary by Pearl Park titled Introspective with Dan Choi.

Introspective with Dan Choi from KoreanAmericanStory on Vimeo.

To vote, follow us on Twitter @audreymagazine and tweet at us with “My vote for the ultimate hottie goes to Dan Choi/@prochoi2014 @audreymagazine #HaikuswithHotties http://kck.st/1N8wnGK


 

Here are the list of people you can vote for:

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Also, the campaign is still running until September 13, so if you want to pre-order or check out one of the other reward perks, go for it!

 

 

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Behind the Mask: Everything You Need to Know About Sheet Masks

 

There’s simply no escaping it, whether you’re 20 or you’re 40 — you’re going to have to incorporate a facial sheet mask into your regimen at some point. And why not? Sheet masks have gotten so technologically advanced and are so wide-ranging, there’s something to address practically every skin care woe. So don’t bypass the opportunity to treat your skin with your own mini facial. At the very least, it’ll force you to give yourself some me time once a week.

 

THE BASIC (AND NOT-SO-BASIC) SHEET MASK

Sheet masks are usually made with fabric or pulp soaked in all sorts of skin-loving goodness. This skin care basic comes in a wide range of price points, so you can wear one every day if you wanted to, or save a more luxe mask for a special occasion. Because the sheet mask sits on your face for anywhere from 10 to 40 minutes, it creates a protective seal as your skin absorbs the nutrients.

 

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La Fresh Eco-Beauty Good Times Facial Treatment Mask

This is a good, basic cotton-silk mask from the eco-conscious company started by Eve Yen. In 10 to 15 minutes, skin is nourished with hyaluronic acid, vitamin B5, cucumber and an anti-aging botanical complex including maqui berry, licorice root, ginkgo biloba leaf, grape seed and hickory bark. It’s also biodegradable, natural and made in California. $20 for 5 masks.

 

Karuna Clarifying+ Face Mask

Created by Linda Wang when she couldn’t find the exact sheet mask she wanted in Asia, Karuna distinguishes itself with its all-natural, biodegradable wood pulp fiber cloth, which retains 50 percent more moisture than synthetic material. The Clarifying mask features antibacterial shiso leaf, antiseptic ginger and soothing honey for oily, hormonal skin. For extra absorption, she recommends soaking the mask in its sealed packet in a bowl of hot water for 3 to 5 minutes. $28 for 4 masks.

 

Dr. Jart Brightening Solution Ultra-fine Microfiber Sheet Mask

This sheet mask from the Korean skin care brand is unique in that it’s made of soft microfiber that they say is finer than a strand of hair, so it conforms to the contours of your face and stays there, allowing for better absorption of active ingredients into the skin. Power ingredients include niacinamide, the antioxidant glutathione and α-bisabolol to even out skin tone. What also differentiates this line of masks are its offerings targeting nasolabial lines, eyes and cheeks, cellulite and even the V-line (chin and jawline). $9 for 1 mask.

 

Dolce & Gabbana Aurealux Mask

This seriously luxe mask features the brand’s signature gold silk sericin in a rich, creamy gel formula on a thick cloth mask that doesn’t budge once it’s on. The mask is so drenched in serum, there should be plenty left over in the packet for you to tap on top of the mask once you have it on, as well as on your neck, chest and even back of your hands. After the requisite 10 minutes, your skin is beyond hydrated — you’ll almost not need to put any other product on afterwards. $169 for a set of 6.

 

THE NEXT GENERATION OF SHEET MASKS

 

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Skin savvy women in South Korea have moved beyond regular cotton sheet masks to hydrogel masks. “The hydrogel is made of polymers that are very absorbent and hold water against your skin,” says Jessica Wu, M.D., Los Angeles dermatologist and assistant clinical professor of dermatology at USC School of Medicine. “The mask traps water more effectively than a sheet mask because water evaporates more slowly from a hydrogel mask.” Another benefit, adds Dr. Wu, is that the gel-like material — which is similar to what she uses on surgical wounds or burns — is more flexible and conforms to your face better than cloth masks. Try Dr. Jart Water-Full Hydrogel Mask, $42 for 5 masks.

Another innovation in mask technology is bio cellulose, which is found in When masks. Founded by Jin Han Lee, the Korean-based company claims that eco-friendly bio cellulose is superior to hydrogel in its ability to conform to the face, thereby minimizing evaporation. As any regular user of masks may know, applying a sheet mask (and keeping it on) is not the most elegant of activities. But once you get the When mask on, massage out the air bubbles and gently press the mask into the contours of your face, and you’ll begin to see the mask almost “melt” onto your skin. $28 for 4 masks.

For a wholly unique mask experience, Dermovia’s Lace Your Face LaceTex Facial Mask offers something akin to shapewear for your face. Yes, the pretty lacy cotton mask is infused with hyaluronic acid, chamomile, dew grass, apple stem cell, Tahitian seawater and squalane, but the kicker is the straps that go around your ears to not only hold your mask in place but give you a little lifting and tightening action around the V-line. $55 for 4 masks.

According to Christine Chang and Sarah Lee of Korean beauty e-tailer Glow Recipe, fermented beauty is the next big thing. And no one does fermented skin care better than Korean eco brand Whamisa. “Cosmetic fermentation is a technique considered to be the next horizon in natural beauty as it helps to micronize ingredients for improved absorption,” says Chang and Lee. One of the brand’s cult-favorite products is the Organic Sea Kelp sheet mask, which is made of actual fermented sea kelp. In fact, take it out of the pack and you’ll be instantly transported to the ocean — it feels and smells like sea kelp (because it is!). $14 for 1 mask.

 

Wanna know more about masks? Read our story on sleep masks here

 

Ryan Higa Fans Organize, and Chef Viet Pham Joins The Hot Nominees

 

We’re collecting votes until Tuesday, August 25 at 11:59PM PST to see who we should pursue for our 2016 Haikus with Hotties calendar, and we’re giving you Daily Hot Five charts so you can see how your hottie is doing and determine when it’s time to rally up the fanbase.

 

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Infographic below updated daily:

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Haikus With Hotties Nomination #4: Viet Pham

 

In case you hadn’t heard, we successfully funded a Kickstarter in less than 3 days on August 18, 2015, and now we’re making a 2016 calendar out of our series Haikus with Hotties.

We have room for 5 more hot guys in the calendar, but we need your help choosing. We started with 10 dream picks, but now we’re putting it up for a general vote — and allowing nominations. (Check out the Kickstarter for details on how to nominate.)

The votes not only tell us who you want us to pursue, but they make it easier for us to convince them to participate if they know that their fans really, really, really want them to be in the calendar.

Our fourth nomination is Viet Pham:

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Sh*t just got real, folks. Of course we all admire these show business men with the camera-friendly muscles, but we all know the surefire way into anyone’s heart is through his or her stomach, and Viet Pham IS THE GUY WHO BEAT BOBBY FLAY IN IRON CHEF AMERICA. A recent contestant on Next Food Network Star, he co-founded Forage Restaurant in Salt Lake City, has been named Food & Wine’s Best New Chef and is a 3-time semifinalist for Best Chef award from the James Beard Foundation. And check out that winning smile. His new venture is a new restaurant called ember + ash.

To vote, follow us on Twitter @audreymagazine and tweet at us with “My vote for the ultimate hottie goes to [Viet Pham/@vphams] @audreymagazine #HaikuswithHotties http://kck.st/1N8wnGK


 

Here are the list of people you can vote for:

 

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Also, the campaign is still running until September 13, so if you want to pre-order or check out one of the other reward perks, go for it!

 

 

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Eugene Yang Fans Unite As He Overtakes the #1 Spot

 

We’re collecting votes until Tuesday, August 25 at 11:59PM PST to see who we should pursue for our 2016 Haikus with Hotties calendar, and we’re giving you Daily Hot Five charts so you can see how your hottie is doing and determine when it’s time to rally up the fanbase.

 

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Infographic below updated daily:

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Haikus With Hotties Nomination #3: Tim Kang

 

In case you hadn’t heard, we successfully funded a Kickstarter in less than 3 days on August 18, 2015, and now we’re making a 2016 calendar out of our series Haikus with Hotties.

We have room for 5 more hot guys in the calendar, but we need your help choosing. We started with 10 dream picks, but now we’re putting it up for a general vote — and allowing nominations. (Check out the Kickstarter for details on how to nominate.)

To vote, follow us on Twitter @audreymagazine and tweet at us with “My vote for the ultimate hottie goes to [Insert Name Here/Twitter] @audreymagazine #HaikuswithHotties http://kck.st/1N8wnGK

The votes not only tell us who you want us to pursue, but they make it easier for us to convince them to participate if they know that their fans really, really, really want them to be in the calendar.

Our second nomination is Tim Kang:

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Tim Kang is best known for playing FBI agent Kimball Cho for seven seasons on the CBS drama The Mentalist. This is a guy who likes fast cars and motorcycles, and he has a black belt in taekwondo which allowed him to tackle many of his own stunts on the show. On his off time, he works with the children’s charity National Center for Missing & Exploited Children® (NCMEC) and started his own production company One Shoot Films.

 


 

Here are the list of people you can vote for:

 

10hottiecollage_2

Also, the campaign is still running until September 13, so if you want to pre-order or check out one of the other reward perks, go for it!

 

 

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Forget KFC: Try Maangchi’s Korean Fried Chicken at Home

 

Maybe it’s the way she always says, “It’s so delicious” and “Hi everybody,” rolling her r’s in the Korean aunt-you-wish-you-had sort of way. Maybe it’s her unabashed style and pep, notwithstanding her 58 years. Whatever Maangchi’s appeal, there is no debating that her 650,000-plus YouTube subscribers are addicted to the Manhattan-based home cook, whose recipes, inspired by those of her grandmother and other women in her family while growing up in the coastal town of Yeosu in South Korea, are immortalized in her first major cookbook, Maangchi’s Real Korean Cooking.

Bona fides: Maangchi’s father ran a fish auction business, so he’d often bring home the choicest catches of the day. She learned to cook from her grandmother, mother and aunts by tasting their versions of each dish and picking up the best recipes.

Authenticity quotient: The recipe for making fermented soybean paste from scratch takes almost a year and requires an electric blanket, hay and ceiling hooks.

Fun aside: In Korea, there are Korean fried chicken restaurants in practically every corner, and many of them have names like mother-in-law’s chicken, son-in-law Lee’s chicken, and wife’s mother’s house. Maangchi explains that the names are a nod to an old tradition: When the son-in-law would visit his wife’s family in the countryside, the family would kill the best chicken and serve it for dinner as a sign of respect and appreciation.

“Woah” factor: Making your own kimchi? Piece of cake. Try making the spicy fermented skate, which is super pungent with a strong ammonia odor. (Skate fish don’t have bladders and basically pees through its skin — you get the picture.) Consider yourself hardcore if you can stomach this delicacy (it’s one of Maangchi’s favorites).

Must-try: KFC, or Korean fried chicken, as featured on the cover of her book. (Her video on it has been viewed almost 3 million times at press time.) Try your hand at her recipe below:

 

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Korean Fried Chicken (Yangnyeom-tongdak)

Serves 10 to 12 as an appetizer, 4 as a main course

When I started posting recipes on YouTube, one of the most requested recipes was for KFC, otherwise known as Korean Fried Chicken. Coated with a sweet, sour, spicy sauce, yangnyeom-tongdak is a relatively modern dish in Korea: it’s take-out food, rarely made at home, so my readers had to wait while I perfected my recipe, which is based on what I saw being made in local fried chicken joints in Gwangju.

When refining the recipe, at first I tried not to use corn syrup or ketchup, replacing them with more wholesome, less sugary ingredients, but I was never satisfied with the result. To get the authentic taste, corn or rice syrup and ketchup are essential. Something else is also necessary: frying the chicken twice.

Double-frying makes the batter-coated chicken stay crunchy for hours after cooking, while leaving the inside moist. When I made the chicken for my children and they said, “Mom, this tastes exactly like the chicken place!” I knew that the recipe was finally just right. You can use a whole chicken; use a cleaver to cut the breast, thighs, and legs into smaller pieces.

 


 

For the chicken

2 pounds chicken wings or chunks of chicken, rinsed in cold water and patted dry, tips removed, drumettes and flats separated

½ cup potato starch or cornstarch

¹⁄³ cup all-purpose flour

½ teaspoon kosher salt

½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

½ teaspoon baking soda

1 large egg, lightly beaten

Corn oil for deep-frying

 


 

For the sauce

2 teaspoons corn oil

3 garlic cloves, minced

¹⁄³ cup ketchup

¹⁄³ cup brown rice syrup (ssal-yeot), corn syrup, or sugar

¼ cup Korean hot pepper paste (gochujang)

2 teaspoons distilled white or apple cider vinegar

1 tablespoon toasted sesame seeds

 


 

1. Make the wings: Combine the chicken, potato starch, flour, salt, pepper, baking soda, and egg in a large bowl and mix with a wooden spoon or your hand until the chicken is well coated.

2. Heat about 4 inches of corn oil in a deep pot over high heat until it reaches 350°F. If you don’t have a thermometer, test it by dipping one piece of chicken in the oil. If it bubbles, it is ready. One by one, carefully add the chicken to the pot, in batches if necessary to avoid crowding, and fry, turning a few times, until crunchy, 10 to 12 minutes. Transfer to a strainer and shake to drain, then transfer the chicken to a large bowl. Return the oil to 350°F and fry a second batch, if necessary. As it sits, the chicken will become less crunchy.

3. Meanwhile, make the sauce: While the chicken is frying, heat a large heavy pan over medium-high heat. Add the corn oil and garlic and cook, stirring, for 30 seconds. Add the ketchup, brown rice syrup, hot pepper paste, and vinegar. Turn the heat down to low and cook, stirring with a wooden spoon, until the sauce bubbles and becomes shiny, about 7 minutes.

4. Fry the wings again: Fry in batches, turning a few times, until the wings are golden brown and very crunchy on the outside, 10 to 12 minutes. Transfer the wings to a strainer and shake to drain, then add them to the pan with the sauce and stir until the chicken is coated.

5. Arrange the chicken on a serving platter, sprinkle with the sesame seeds, and serve.

 

Text excerpted from MAANGCHI’S REAL KOREAN COOKING, © 2015 by Maangchi. Photos © Maangchi. Reproduced by permission of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. All rights reserved.

 

 

Recipe photo credit: © Maangchi

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