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Fall 2012 | Mind and Body: Fighting Adult Acne
  • by Audrey Archives
  • May 31, 2013
adultacne

DEPT Mind and Body
Issue Fall 2013
Author Anna M. Park

HED: Fight the Blight

Acne affects 40 to 50 million Americans; nearly 85 percent of all people have acne at some point in their lives. And while acne medications abound to treat this most common skin disorder in the U.S., more and more experts are recommending lifestyle and diet changes to fight adult acne.

The best explanation I have ever found on adult acne is in celebrity dermatologist Dr. Jessica Wu’s book, Feed Your Face (feedyourface.com). Contrary to popular belief, Dr. Wu espouses that what you eat does affect your complexion. According to Dr. Wu, “women with adult acne also tend to have higher levels of insulin in their blood, elevated androgens (the male sex hormone), and higher rates of insulin resistance than those without.” Androgens naturally spike around ovulation, which can lead to hormonal acne, usually showing up on the chin, neck and jawline. While there’s not much you can do about PMS, there hormone associated with increased oil production and clogged pores. are things you can do to minimize the hormonal effects on your complexion.

Avoid high glycemic index foods.
High-sugar and refined carbs cause your blood sugar to spike, which stimulates your body to pump out insulin, which in turn raises androgen levels, excess oil and increased skin cell production, all of which lead to clogged pores and breakouts. In other words, no white rice or bread, and limit sugars, including processed luncheon meats, ketchup and pasta sauces.

Cut out full-fat milk and dairy.
Even organic cow’s milk contains hormones, which have been shown to elevate insulin production the way white bread does.

Avoid foods high in iodine like eggs, seaweed, sushi rolls and salty food.
Eat more zinc-rich foods like lean red meat, lentils and raw oysters, which fight inflammation and acne- causing bacteria.

Eat more Omega-3s found in almonds, walnuts, flaxseed, and cold- water fish like salmon or tuna, which fight inflammation and decreases the hormone associated with increased oil production and clogged pores.

Diana Seo also believes that what goes into our body is reflected on the outside. As founder and president of B Spa Bar (bspabar.com) in the Privé Salon at New York’s Soho Grand Hotel, Seo incorporates both Eastern and Western techniques to maintain balance and a healthy life. By using a system similar to the way ancient Chinese herbalists map the face, Seo can often tell the cause of the acne. If the breakout occurs near the jawline, it is usually hormonal; cheek acne may be lung-related; stomach issues often lead to breakouts on the mouth or chin; acne on the nose relates to the heart.

To treat adult acne, Seo will put her clients on a detox program using GliSODin Skin Nutrients powder for 15 days. She encourages clients to drink a lot of water and eat lots of col- orful veggies and fruit, and consume less sugar, salty food and processed foods. She also likes LED light to treat blemishes. At B Spa Bar, she utilizes the ANSR: BEAM, a two-in-one device that utilizes blue LED light to treat blemishes followed by red LED light to increase collagen production and reduce redness.

Finally, says Seo, change your nighttime routine. Shower and cleanse at night before going to bed — your skin heals itself during sleep. Sleep on your back, not on your side or face down, to avoid clogging pores. And change your pillow covers often to avoid getting the dirt on your pillow onto your face. >>

Eat more Omega-3s found in almonds, walnuts, flaxseed, and cold- water fish like salmon or tuna, which fight inflammation and decreases the hormone associated with increased oil production and clogged pores.

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