Cargo’s Judy Yonemoto Shares Celeb Makeup Secrets
  • by Audrey Archives
  • May 30, 2013
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Want gorgeous skin like Maggie Q’s? Read on.
Cargo’s Judy Yonemoto on how to look as good as your favorite celebs.

ISSUE: Summer 2011

DEPT: Beauty Kit


Makeup artist Judy Yonemoto, a member of cosmetic brand Cargo’s Elite Artist Community, specializes in film and television, and is currently working with the cast of NBC’s hit comedy Outsourced. It’s a perfect fit for the Japanese American because Cargo’s blu-ray High Definition line was specifically designed with photochromatic pigments and micronized minerals to meet the challenges of high definition filming. Here, Judy addresses some of the makeup issues important to Asian women.


Q. Makeup artists say too much foundation ages you, but we Asian women need to cover up our sunspots. What’s the right balance?

Judy: I agree that too much powder or heavy foundation can be aging, but there is definitely a way to apply it to keep a youthful look. First, use a light layer of primer to prep the skin for the foundation. Whether you apply a sheer or full coverage foundation, it is all about blending, blending, blending! Even a full coverage foundation can be applied lightly and blended carefully so that it doesn’t look heavy. Then take a small brush and lightly pat concealer over any imperfections. Finally, I use a sheer translucent powder and lightly brush over just the forehead, down the center and sides of the nose, and the nasolabial and chin area. I don’t powder under the eyes and the cheekbones. This way the face doesn’t look oily, but still has a nice dewy finish.


Judy Yonemoto.

Q. When I wear foundation that matches my face, it’s usually darker than my neck. But if I lighten up, I look like a ghost in photos. Help!

Judy: Match the foundation color to the area above the jaw line. Don’t try to match the forehead because that area is usually darker than the rest of the face. When applying the foundation make sure to blend it down the neck. If the neck and collarbone area still seem lighter than the face, lightly brush bronzer over the sides of the neck to even out the color.

Q. What are the basics in applying eyeliner and shadow if you don’t have an eyelid crease but still want to “open up” the eyes?

Judy: First, take a small eyeliner brush and apply a dark brown, charcoal or even plum eyeliner close to the lash line. Then take a medium tone shadow and very lightly feather up from the eyeliner without going too high on the lid. The effect you are trying to achieve is the darkest color close to the lashes, and gradually fading up very naturally. The shadow should be matte, but if you want a bit of shimmer, apply a darker, shimmery eyeshadow or eyeliner to the outer corners of the eyes, sweeping up and blending out. This will open up and emphasize the beautiful shape of the Asian eye.

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Audrey Magazine is an award-winning national publication that covers the Asian experience from the perspective of Asian American women. Audrey covers the latest talent and trends in entertainment, fashion, beauty and lifestyle.

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