These Naptime Adventures Are A Must-See

According to, babies are incapable of nightmares because they haven’t yet grasped the concept of fear. Instead, their dreams are filled with silent, vivid images. So what exactly do babies dream about during these sleep-fests? Researchers are still in the dark when it comes to knowing what babies actually dream about, but Queenie Liao certainly has an adorable way of showing what she thinks these dreams consist of.

Liao, mother of three, decided to utilize her baby’s naptime for some creative art. Using household materials such as blankets and stuffed animals, Liao makes every naptime photo an adventure.

Her photo art album, Wengenn in Wonderland, consists of over a hundred naptime adventures with Liao’s son, Wengenn. Trust us, it’s quite a delight.

If baby dreams are anything like the ones Queenie Liao imagines, then we certainly have something to be envious about.

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Throwback Thursday | How (NOT) To Pick Up An Asian Girl

Lets just make one thing clear: If you’re going to include race when trying to flirt with a girl (which we don’t suggest you do), you’d better choose your words wisely. Apparently, some people have an awfully strange approach to flirting with Asian women and (trust us) a lot of the time this won’t end in their favor. We’ve come across quite a few no-no’s ourselves and we’re here to share them. Continue reading for a list of things NOT to do to pick up an Asian Girl.

1. Do NOT make her part of your collection.

Stamp Collection

“I’ve always wanted to date an Asian girl”
“Asian is the only type I haven’t dated before”

The last thing we want is to have someone date us just so that we complete their collection of ethnicities. We understand that you may be intrigued by something new, but this is definitely not the way to show it.


2. Do NOT come up to an Asian girl saying “NiHao”, “Ahnyoung”, or “Konnichiwa”.

One Direction (even though I love them)

“I was at a bar with my language partner from Korea, mind you she’s fluent in English and German, and this guy approaches us and drunkenly says “Ahnyoung” in a really bad accent. She looks him dead in the eye and says in flawless English, “You’re not even saying it correctly…” and we walk away laughing. Wongfu Productions was incorrect in their “Yellow Fever” video, it is NOT true that Caucasian guys can get an Asian girl by saying hi in a foreign language with a bad accent.”

This is especially true if you’re not even sure of a girl’s race. We’ve already had to deal with a lifetime of people assuming Asians are all the same.



3. Do NOT compare her to “typical” Asian girls.

Angry Asian Girls by Lela Lee

“There was a guy who tried to compliment me by saying the way I speak and even my major in college (English) is not like all the other Asian girls. He went on talking about how Asian accents are unattractive and how it was such a good thing I was so “Americanized”. He thought he was complimenting me by elevating me above other Asians, but he really just ended up insulting my culture. No go.”

If you think that we take this as a compliment then you’re mistaken- especially if it’s clear that your definition of a “typical Asian girl” is distorted.



4. Do NOT think you’re gonna win her over by saying you like her food.

“Oh you’re Chinese? I love Chinese food!”

You’d be surprised how often we get this. We appreciate that you like our food, but that has absolutely nothing to do with you dating us. This may be an effort to try and connect with us, but really- that’s a stretch.



5. Do NOT think that racial comments are attractive.

See our post on “The New Alexandra Wallace” here.

“In high school, a boy said, “If i came to your house to pick you up on a date and met your dad, would he come at me with a samurai sword?” “

This tactic is neither cute, nor intelligent, nor charming. Quite frankly it’s just not very nice.



6. Do NOT point out that you have Asian friends to try to charm us.

21 And Over

“Once I had a guy try and connect with me by saying “I like Asian people. I have an Asian friend actually.” Did he really think that just because he got along with his one Asian friend, I would automatically think he’d be a good boyfriend?”

That’s splendid that you have Asian friends, but just like the food comment- it has nothing to do with us dating you.



7. Do NOT say you have “yellow fever” or only date Asian girls.

Watch Wong Fu’s Yellow Fever here.

“I once went on a date with a guy who complained and said his options were limited since his parents only approved of Asian girls. I don’t need a guy who thinks he’s settling for me”
“He thought it was cute to tell me he had Yellow fever.”

We don’t want someone who is dating us merely for the color of our skin. Its perfectly fine for you to have a preference to Asian girls (you can’t help what you’re attracted to). We don’t even have a problem if you only date Asian girls, but we don’t want to hear that our race is the only/main reason you’re dating us.



8. Do NOT overgeneralize Asian girls .

Alexandra Wallace

“I don’t usually date Asian girls, they always get too jealous”
“I don’t normally date Asian girls, I can’t deal with the accent”

Being like Alexandra Wallace when you talk about Asian girls would be counter-productive for you. You are simultaneously assuming that all Asian women are the same and insulting us. Heads up, this won’t work on us.

Why Japanese Youth Have Stopped Having Sex

Currently, Japan has one of the world’s lowest birth rates in the world. Although its population is 126 million, that number is dropping every year and it pales in comparison to the U.S. population of 314 million and China’s 1.35 billion. In fact, fewer Japanese babies were born in 2012 than any other year in history.

According to sex and relationship counselor Ai Aoyama, this number could drop dangerously low with the current views of the Japanese youth. Aoyama is hoping to cure Japan’s wave of “celibacy syndrome” which has young adults losing interest in both physical and romantic relationships. In fact, many do not see marriage in their future at all. In 2011, a study showed that 61% of unmarried men and 49% of women aged 18-34 were not in any kind of romantic relationship and a third of people under 30 had never dated at all.

There are many speculations as to why Japanese young adults feel no need for human affection. The Guardian argues that Japan is “battling against the effects on its already nuclear-destruction-scarred psyche of 2011’s earthquake.” This scared mentality leaves Japanese citizens with the feeling that there is simply no point to relationships and no point to love.

Some of Aoyama’s patients are in their 30’s and have shut themselves off from the world. In fact, some of these individuals can’t even touch a member of the opposite sex and prefer other forms of intimacy. For instance, Aoyama describes one of her clients who “can’t get sexually aroused unless he watches female robots on a game similar to Power Rangers.” Aside from talks and tutorials with her patients, Aoyama uses therapy, yoga and hypnosis to try and help her patients.

The Guardian also argues another reason for this loss of interest. With Japan’s current lifestyle desire, marriage and relationships simply do not make sense. In today’s modern Japan, marriage is seen as a “grave” for career-focused women.The World Economic Forum ranks Japan as one of the world’s worst nations for gender equality at work. Promotions for women in the workplace is difficult as it is. Once a woman is married, it is seen as nearly impossible because of the assumption that the woman will have children. 70% of Japanese women leave their job after their first child since it is socially expected for mothers to stay home and raise their children.  Japan’s Institute of Population and Social Security reports 90% of young women believe that single life is “preferable to what they imagine marriage to be like”.

Men also seem to have no problem in the apathy wagon. The Guardian claims that men have become less career-driven and as such, do not want the responsibility of the traditional household role as the provider.

Despite the overwhelming lack of enthusiasm, Aoyama is determined to put human intimacy back on the map. Hopefully this task can be achieved soon. According to Kunio Kitamura, head of the JFPA, the issue is so serious that he fears Japan “might eventually perish into extinction.”


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Image of The Day: Unbelievably Cute Food Art

Move over adorable rice pandas, we’ve found something even more squeal-worthy. Samantha Lee, a Malaysian mother-of-two, claims that she is not a professional chef and has not been to culinary school. Despite this, she has been able to produce some of the most impressive works of food art.

Lee began Bento making in 2008 while still pregnant with her second daughter. With a new baby on the way, she needed a method to encourage her eldest daughter to start eating independently. This is when her creativity and skilled hands took over.

Using ordinary household tools such as knives and scissors, Lee began turning her daughter’s food into adorable works of art that featured popular characters from mangas, movies, cartoons and more.

“I’m just an ordinary, regular and average mom, crazy about making mess in the kitchen.” Lee says. But thanks to this “mess,” Lee has become an international media sensation. Lee has grabbed the attention of people worldwide and is now a kids party planner.

Check out her must-see collection of food art. Trust us. After seeing these images, you’ll be positively envious of her daughters.

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Image of The Day: Kohei Matsuno’s Must-See Coffee Art

Coffee art has recently been growing in popularity. No longer do we merely see images of a leaf or a heart on top of a latte. Artists have become more and more creative with their coffee art designs and methods.

One artist in particular has been catching quite some attention for his detailed work. Kohei Matsuno, a Japanese barista, turned his part-time job into his canvas.

Matsuno began by creating detailed images onto his coffee. Often, these images were of traditional Japanese landscapes, popular manga characters and realistic portraits. Then, he decided to take his art one step further.

Feeling limited by the flat surface of the coffee, Matsuno began creating 3D pop-up coffee art. Using large amounts of milk foam, Matsuno created cute shapes with sharp tools and toothpicks.

Of course, this is no easy task. The designs often remain simple because Matsuno has only five minutes before his medium begins to melt away. Luckily, no one seems to mind the simplicity of his work. In fact his adorable work has made him one of the most popular latte artists in Japan.

Check out his work below:

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Asian Woman Turns To Photoshop To Change Appearance

Yesterday, we pointed out that the pressure to be thin is only one of the many issues that Asian women face. The need to be beautiful seems to increase daily and Asian women are taking extreme measures to get there.

One such measure is surgery. Last month, the public couldn’t stop talking about television personality Julie Chen and her decision to go under the knife to progress her career. Of course, this is nothing compared to the startling amount of surgeries happening in Asia.

Korean photographer Ji Yeo claims, “Plastic surgery has become an integral part of Korea’s current culture, often regarded as an integral step in the self improvement process. It is a culture where men are judged on their financial balance sheet and women on their beauty. The male-dominated media endlessly reinforces its model of the idea woman. As a result of these cultural forces Korea has become a beauty-oriented society where people are judged more for their appearance than their character.”

In fact, a Korean woman recently went through a number of surgical procedures to look like Victoria’s Secret model, Miranda Kerr. Of course, all this comes with a price. Aside from the rather large sum of money women are coughing up to be more beautiful, surgery runs the risk of long-term complications. Take Xiao Lian for example. The already pretty woman decided to get surgery on her face and is now struggling with the deterioration of her face years later.

So what’s a girl to do when she doesn’t want the risks of surgery, but can’t deal with the overwhelming pressure to be beautiful? Apparently, some Asian women are turning to photoshop.

The rise of social media and online dating has its share of ups and downs. A notable downside to online dating is the misleading profile pictures. Who hasn’t heard of proper “myspace angles” when taking pictures or the infamous guy who posts up a pictures of himself ten years younger. Social media users have all been warned time and time again– what you see is not necessarily what you get.

A Chinese news and gossip site recently posted up pictures of a woman before and after photoshop. The images quickly went viral and left many Chinese readers in disbelief. World News Views reports, “Reactions ranged from impressed to shocked to downright disturbed that such a ‘plain’ person could become a radiant beauty when equipped with the right tools. Some people needed to be convinced that it was even the same girl.”

To many of us, the altering of pictures is nothing new. In fact, this has become so common that there are even mobile apps which “beautify” pictures as well. For example, the app Beauty Plus smoothens pores, slims down your face, and brightens your eyes with just one tap.

The pressure to be beautiful will surely increase with the rise in photoshop and beauty apps. So tell us what you think– Is it too much? Did this girl even need photoshop to begin with?

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Why Nicolas Cage Hopes To See More Asian Male Actors in Hollywood

When we think of the people who advocate for the advancement of the Asian community in American cinema, we admit that Nicolas Cage is not one of the first names that come to mind. Nonetheless, an interview with Chinese state broadcaster CCTV shows that his name should be on that list.

Cage, an award-winning actor, producer and director, was in China to shoot an upcoming period drama Outcast. The film, which is directed by Nick Powell, is set in China and allowed Cage to work with a Chinese crew as well as Chinese co-stars such as  Liu Yifei.

Cage notes that this is his first time filming a movie in China, but hopes to continue working with China after enjoying this experience. After praising his co-star’s performance as well as the Chinese film industry, Cage turned the conversation to focus on Chinese actors in American Cinema.

“I hope that we will see more Chinese actors in American cinema too,” Cage says. “We do see Gong Li, Zhang Ziyi and Chow Yun Fat, but it’s very rare to see the Chinese male actor in Hollywood movies, which is something I take great umbrage with. You know, my son is Asian. He may want to direct one day; he may want to be an actor like his father — and I want that to be open to him. So I want to make some kind of effort to see more of that happen in Hollywood.”

For those who are unaware, Cage’s wife Alice Kim is Korean American. Because their 8-year-old son Kal-El (Yes, he’s named after named after Superman’s birth name on planet Krypton) is part Asian American, this is an issue which hits home for Cage.

We agree with you, Nicolas Cage. We certainly hope for that too.

Watch the entire interview here.

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Image of The Day: Disney Princesses Dress Up For Halloween

Recently, Disney Princesses have been getting quite a bit of attention. Just the other day Mulan was revealed to be bisexual on Once Upon A Time and last month, we got a look at Disney princesses portrayed by Asian Americans.

With Halloween around the corner, we can only expect the hype around these Disney Princesses to get larger. Year after year, more young girls wish to put on a costume of their favorite princess and act out a Disney fairytale.

But what if the tables were turned? Artist  Isaiah K Stephens decided to show how some of our favorite princesses would look like if they dressed up as their favorite superhero or heroine for Halloween.

Some of our favorites include Rapunzel as Japanese manga heroine Sailor Moon, Tianna as Katara from Avatar: The Last Airbender and Jasmine and Chun-Li from Street Fighter.

Check out more Disney Princesses dressed up and stay tuned for a second set which will include Alice, Kida, Megara, Jane Porter, Tinkerbell, Charlotte La boff,  Esmeralda, and Sally.

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Breaking The Asian Myth | “Asians Don’t Get Fat”


We’ve heard a lot of stereotypes about Asians.

There’s the very incorrect myth that all Asians have the same kind of hair. Apparently, being Asian automatically means straight, sleek, black hair. Then there’s the dangerous myth about Asians and breast cancer. Wrong again.

And now, we’ve come to a myth that many of us have heard since childhood:
You’re lucky you’re Asian. Asians don’t get fat.”

This is the part where we all let out a collective sigh. Obviously, that phrase is extremely problematic. Asians are human and fully capable of putting on weight. Sure, there are a number of Asians that are thin or petite, but by no means is this the case for all Asians. Setting the boundary that Asians don’t get overweight can create quite a few problems for our community.


Take Maria Kang (above) for example. Controversial photo aside, it is clear that this mother of three had to work hard to get the impressively fit body that she has now. Among the negative comments shot at her, there were a number of people saying that her achievements are nothing to boast about because she’s Asian and “Asians are naturally thin.” Suddenly, hard work of any sort is simply waved off as nothing.

Make no mistake– there are certainly Asians on the heavier side. Now imagine how a heavy-set Asian feels in the midst of such high expectations? What does a woman do when society makes her believe that her culture is genetically engineered to be thin, but she is not? Now more than ever, Asian women are turning to surgery to fit these high beauty standards. With the ideal weight for Asian women getting smaller and smaller everyday, we began to wonder just how true this stereotype is. Lucky for us, we weren’t the only ones who saw flaws in the idea that “Asians don’t get fat.”

NBC recently took a closer look at where Asian Americans rank on the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and noted two very big problems which would lead to incorrect results.

According to the survey, obesity does not appear to be an issue with the Asian American community, but it is important to take note of their definition of obese. In order to judge obesity, the NHANES looks at body mass index (BMI). A BMI above 25 is considered overweight and a BMI of 30 or higher is considered obese. By these standard, only 10.8 % of Asians are obese compared to the 33% of white, 42% of Hispanics, and 48% of blacks.

The problem? The BMI of an Asian is not an accurate indicator of whether or not that person suffers from the health risks related to obesity. For instance, Asian Americans are at risk for diabetes with a BMI of just 24 and at risk for cardiovascular disease with a BMI of 19. By the NHANES standards, these BMI’s are not even considered overweight and yet it is enough to bring the complications of obesity to Asian Americans.

The second major problem is the giant umbrella term “Asian.”  NBC notes that this term “is defined the same way the 2010 U.S. Census defined the term: Americans with descendants from the Far East, Southeast Asia or the Indian subcontinent — that includes Cambodia, China, India, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Pakistan, the Philippine Islands, Thailand and Vietnam.” By categorizing so many types of Asians into the same field, it is easy to overlook the results of the individual ethnicities.

According to a CDC report in 2008, Filipinos are 70% more likely to be obese compared to the other Asian Americans while a number of Vietnamese and Korean adults are underweight. Clearly, obesity issues vary amongst the different types of Asians. Scott Chan, the program director for the Asian Pacific Islander Obesity Prevention Alliance, points out, “Combined together, it looks like we don’t have a problem. It kind of propagates that ‘model minority’ myth — that Asians are healthier, we’re skinny, we’re fine.”

So as much as we buy into the idea that Asians are naturally thin, it is quite a danger to our community. Do some Asians get fat? Yes. Should we still worry about the health risks associated with obesity? Absolutely.



Must-See Video | Martial Arts Has NEVER Been This Cute

We’ve definitely shown you quite a number of cute children on this site. In July, we brought you the Adorable Asian Baby Overload. More recently, we threw some Halloween costumes on these babies and came up with the Halloween Costume Edition. Needless to say, these adorable children pull at our heartstrings and apparently we’re not the only ones.

This video has an incredible 1,430,000+ views and over 3,000 likes. Clearly, many people were just as taken with the cuteness. Although this video was put up in 2011, it appears to be going through yet another round of viral attention. This is probably thanks to Buzzfeed  and Reddit who have called this “The Cutest Taekwondo Match Ever.”

Don’t believe us? See it for yourself below and don’t worry. Check out those smiles- they’re far from hurting each other. In fact, they might just end up hurting us after smiling so much.