Viral Video Alert: How Languages Sound to Foreigners

When we don’t understand a language, our minds naturally focus on things outside of comprehension. We focus on how the dialect sounds. We notice the accents, the tongue rolling, the dips and the particular pronunciations. You may only speak a few languages, but you’d be surprised to discover how many you recognize based on sound.

Similarly, I’m sure we’ve all wondered how our own dialect sounds like to a foreign ear. Is it pretty? Do our words sound beautifully slurred together or do they rise and dip in an intriguing manner?

Well this Finnish woman has certainly thought about it and seems determined to master the art of various accents.. without actually learning different languages.

19-year-old Finnish YouTube user Sara is seen in this video spending nearly two minutes speaking absolute gibberish. She may not know many languages, but she certainly sounds like she does.

Throughout the video, Sara mimics what various languages sound like to her. While she may throw in a few correct words here and there, she clearly does not know how to actually speak the languages. She reminds us that correct speech is not the purpose of her video anyway. She simply wants to demonstrate how different languages sound like to the foreign ear.

During her demonstration of an American accent, she says “Yeah, I mean, uh. Trevor-mis-underpairing-like-monin-fair. Follow me, like a pending friend-tricket. Balone-a-value precise-y. Hello?”

Clearly, she only knows a few words in English, but her ability to capture the accent is undeniable.

She also does a version of Japanese. Unfortunately, many viewers have said this is her weakest accent. Additionally, she ends the video with an “East Asian” demonstration that sounds closer to South Asia’s Vietnamese accent.

Of course, we understand that what we hear is simply a demonstration of how languages sounds like to her. This doesn’t seem to stop people from putting in their two cents. While the majority of viewers are impressed by her skills, there have been some people who are insulted that their language was not perfected and is shown in this manner.

Whatever the opinions may be, there is no denying this video is going viral. Less than a week since its release, the video has already gained nearly 4 million views on YouTube.

 

What Happens When Japanese Students Have No Dresscode For Graduation?

Graduation in the U.S. is quite different from culminating ceremonies in Japan. While we generally imagine shiny graduation gowns and square-shaped caps, Japan doesn’t typically require such an outfit. Instead, junior and highschool students wear matching uniforms while college graduates wear formal clothing. This usually means men in suits and women in kimonos.

But the Kanazawa College of Art is not like other colleges. Graduates are apparently allowed to wear absolutely whatever they would like. So what happens when Japanese students have no dresscode for graduation?

Some of the best cosplay ever.

Of course, all the efforts put into their graduation costume has gained quite some popularity for the school and has gotten media attention.

Check out some of the creative graduation costumes below.

grad 1 grad 2 grad 3

 

grad 4 grad 5 grad 6

grad 7

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(source)

Tearjerker Alert: Parents Receive Letter From Their Daughter Three Years After Her Death

The Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami, otherwise known as the Great East Japan Earthquake, left Japan shattered in 2011. With a magnitude of 9.0, this earthquake is the most powerful recorded earthquake to ever have hit Japan.

According to the National Police Agency, there were 15,884 deaths, 6,147 people injured, 2,636 people missing, 127,290 buildings totally collapsed, 272,788 buildings ‘half collapsed’ and 747,989 buildings partially damaged.

Among those who died in this tragic earthquake was the daughter of a 59 year-old father and a 51 year-old mother.

Although the identity of this family remains hidden, Kotaku reports, “The daughter graduated high school in 2003 and got a job as a bus guide in Kyoto. After that, she returned to her hometown of Otsuchi and got part-time work. It was hit by a 9.0 magnitude earthquake and ensuing tsunami. The daughter was in Otsuchi town hall, which was swallowed by the tsunami. She was never found.”

The parents were left grief-stricken and the father reportedly stopped caring whether or not he lived or died.

Suddenly, three years after the death of their daughter, the parents received a letter from her.

“Mom and Dad, by the time you get this letter, perhaps you’ll have a grandchild?” the daughter wrote. “I think I’ll be married with a child, but what if I’m all alone?”

The parents quickly wondered if their daughter was still alive. After all, her body had never been found. Instead, they discovered that she wrote the letter ten years ago on January 10, 2004. She had used a service called “Heartful Letter” which will hold your letter and deliver it ten years later.

“Dad and Mom, you have taken so, so much care of me,” she wrote, “From now on, I will take care of the both of you.”

The touching letter was enough to pull the couple out of their grief. They have decided to live of happiness that would make their daughter proud.