Calling All ‘Frozen’ Fans: The Cutest Marriage Proposal EVER

It’s been months since its release, but people still can’t stop talking about the Disney animated film, Frozen. The film has been gathering nominations left and right, has stolen the hearts of many, and has already slid past the $300M mark domestically and over $600M worldwide. Frozen is on its way to being the highest-grossing Disney Animation release in history.

Because the film’s popularity, it’s no surprise that we’ve seen fans everywhere cover the songs in Frozen. Young girls are belting out the lyrics to “Let it Go” and social media seems to have been covered with a single question: do you want to build a snowman?

In the midst of all these fan tributes to the film, it was difficult to find just one that stood out. But then we stumbled upon this.

Here at Audrey, we’ve seen our share of marriage proposals. We’ve seen uncomfortable ones, elaborate ones, and even ones which defy gender roles. Now, it looks like we’ve found the most adorable proposal.

Watch it below:

 

 

Mindy Kaling’s Comic Strip!?

We know Mindy Kaling as the popular actress, comedian, writer and producer most known for her role as Kelly Kapoor in The Office and for creating and starring in The Mindy Project. Of course, here at Audrey Magazine, we also know her as our Winter 2011-12 cover girl. 

As it turns out, we’ve all been unaware of another talent under Kaling’s belt.

The 2001 Dartmouth college graduate apparently had a popular comic strip in the Dartmouth school newspaper titled “Badly Drawn Girl.”

“There were times I was at The D at like 3 a.m., outside in my car while it was snowing and I’d just put my blinkers on and sit there drawing. I don’t know how I kept up with everything.” Kaling tells Dartmouth Alumni Magazine who claim that the comic strip quickly made Kaling a “campus celebrity.”

Lucky for us, some of Kaling’s comic strips have been making its way onto social media. You may not recognize Kaling’s birthname Vera Mindy Chokalingam, but you will recognize her notable wit and humor sprinkled throughout her comics. Check them out for yourself.

 

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Did HIMYM Go Too Far OR Have Asians Become Hypersensitive?

By now, you’ve probably heard about the controversial episode of How I Met Your Mother. If not, lets get you caught up.

The newest episode “Slapsgiving 3: Slappointment in Slapmarra,”  continued an on-going joke throughout the show where Marshall Eriksen (Jason Segel) humorously slaps Barney Stinson (Neil Patrick Harris).

Segel’s character explains that he went through training in Shanghai, China to perfect his slapping skills. The show then reveals his three “masters” who turn out to be the other main characters sporting Asian attire, hair accessories, and even a  Fu Manchu mustache.

As you can expect, most of the Asian American community felt that all the “yellowface” used was a personal slap to our face. The episode angered so many viewers that  the hashtag  #HowIMetYourRacism blew up on twitter.

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In response to the massive backlash,  How I Met Your Mother co-creator Carter Bays tweeted his apology.

Hey guys, sorry this took so long. @himymcraig and I want to say a few words about #HowIMetYourRacism. With Monday’s episode, we set out to make a silly and unabashedly immature homage to Kung Fu movies, a genre we’ve always loved. But along the way we offended people. We’re deeply sorry, and we’re grateful to everyone who spoke up to make us aware of it. We try to make a show that’s universal, that anyone can watch and enjoy. We fell short of that this week, and feel terrible about it. To everyone we offended, I hope we can regain your friendship, and end this series on a note of goodwill. Thanks. @CarterBays@HimymCraig

— Carter Bays (@CarterBays) January 15, 2014

This is the point where opinions begin to divide. Some of the Asian community pointed out that while the apology is appreciated, something so obviously offensive never should have been aired. They have pointed out that we have had to hear this apology too many times and you would think that people would know to not use a culture as a costume. Angry Asian Man spilled out his sentiments by writing:

I appreciate apologies that acknowledge wrongdoing and avoid placing blame on the offended. People make mistakes. But this apology sounds a lot like the really really nice guy who hates it when people are mad at him. We get it, you feel terrible that we were offended. You feel terrible that you messed up. So how about actually addressing what you did to mess up? Aw, hell. I’m nitpicking at lackluster apologies.

Really, you just wish they’d had the sense to avoid this bullshit altogether. Obviously, as usual, that was asking too much. Now we all have that image of fu manchu’d Ted Moseby seared into our souls.

But then others in the Asian American community are disagreeing with the backlash all together. They claim that the apology is sincere, they acknowledged their mistake, and as a community, we are slowly opening the eyes of others. They point out that it’s a process and we need to allow people to see, acknowledge, and change their mistakes. This opinion can be seen with CNN host Don Lemon interviewing the popular Vietnamese comedian Dat Phan on his thoughts towards the controversy. Watch it below.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KGU4BGBzpqw&feature=youtu.be

 

So now we turn towards the real question. Did How I Met Your Mother go too far? Are we tired of hearing all the excuses given to us when all we’re asking for is respect for our culture? OR is Dat Phan correct in saying that we have become hypersensitive and not everything concerning Asians should cause offense?

Watch the How I Met Your Mother clip below and tell us what you think. 

 

Strange New Japanese Photo Trend?

One of Japan’s most popular subcultures is the gyaru/gal subculture. Gyaru is largely characterized by having heavily bleached or dyed hair fashioned in big and eccentric hairstyles, highly decorated nails, dramatic makeup and equally dramatic clothes.

Even more interesting, this Japanese street fashion has various subcategories which have distinct styles. Some wear more glitter, some dress up in school uniforms, some even sport dark spray-on tans. Needless to say, these boys and girls are not afraid to catch attention.

And that’s exactly what they’ve been doing. The current trending topic on Japanese twitter as well as 2ch, the country’s largest and most popular online forum, is a new Japanese photo trend that seems to be gaining popularity in the gyaru subculture.

If you were upset that the duckface ruined pictures, you haven’t seen anything yet. This possible new photo trend seems to defeat the purpose of the picture all together.

According to Kotaku, the latest photo trend to hit Toyko is to hide your face by looking down while a picture is being taken. Everything else about the photo seems natural. Many of the girls are even still throwing up a peace sign.

You can bet people have been confused about this pose which Japanese media is calling the “Face Down Pose.” People have tried to find the meaning and purpose behind the photo trend. Some claim the teens are trying to make their head/hair appear larger. Others have said that the culture is shy and ashamed of how they look, but we doubt that one.

Realistically, trends may not have a reason behind them at all. Someone could have looked down once and others followed along for humorous purposes.

Whatever the reason, let’s just hope the trend doesn’t make its way here. The last thing we need is a bunch of faceless pictures. pt 2 pt 3 pt 4 pt 5 pt 6

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Already Broke Your New Year’s Resolutions? Feel Better With Wong Fu’s Resolution Fails

It’s hard to believe that its been two weeks since the Times Square Ball dropped and welcomed 2014.

And what comes along with every New Year? You guessed it- a handful of determined people making New Year’s resolutions. According to Statistic Brain, the top ten New Year’s resolutions of 2014 are as follows:
1) Lose weight.
2) Get organized.
3) Spend less and save more.
4) Enjoy life to the fullest.
5) Stay fit and healthy.
6) Learn something exciting.
7) Quit smoking.
8) Help others in their dreams.
9) Fall in love.
10) Spend more time with family.

Unfortunately, less than 10% of people admit to being successful with their New Year’s resolutions every year. Even though we’re only two weeks into 2014, many people have already given up on their resolutions, haven’t started yet, or say they’re “taking a break.”

So where do you fall?

If you seem to have already broken your New Year’s Resolutions, don’t worry! It’s time to bring back Wong Fu’s “Two Weeks Later: Resolution Fails” short to remind us that we’re not alone with our resolution fails. Check it out below.

 

Besides, who says New Years is the only time you can improve your life?

This May Be The Most Awkward Thing You Watch Today

These days, we embrace awkward and quirky. In fact, many of Hollywood’s top celebs (looking at you Jennifer Lawrence) embrace and openly admit to awkwardness. Even the newest Disney Princess, Anna from the Golden Globe-winning animated film Frozen, points out that she’s awkward.

But Rio Mints Hong Kong has decided to take this word to a new level. A Rio Mints commercial, which was released late last month, has been making its way around social media and has gathered quite some attention.

In the commercial, a pair of friends are innocently sporting some beachwear and enjoying what seems to be a carnival of some sort. After the woman offers the man a Rio Mint, the commercial becomes completely unrelated to candy. With a… unique way of utilizing a puppet llama, this commercial certainly tops our awkward list.

And no, not the cute-and-charming kind of awkward. This is the kind of awkward that leaves you confused and not sure how to feel. Watch it for yourself below.

 

Calling All Screenwriters!

Are you an aspiring screenwriter? Do you have material, but need some guidance on how to successfully pitch your project? We’ve got just the thing.

The 14th Annual Coalition for Asian Pacifics in Entertainment (CAPE) New Writers Fellowship is now open for submissions.

The two submission categories are Film and Television. If you are one of the 10 fellows selected, you (or your writing team) will receive $1,000 stipend, intensive 11-session curriculum with industry professionals in Los Angeles from March to April (all finalists must be attend all classes and lab sessions), and exclusive opportunities to meet with successful entertainment agents, managers, producers, and executives.

The deadline to enter is January 31, 2014. For more information, click here.

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Adorable Asian Babies Who Dress Better Than You

Our faithful Audrey readers have made one thing clear to us: they love adorable Asian babies. Of course, we don’t blame them. Who can resist squealing over those round eyes and chubby cheeks?

To appease our readers, we brought you the Adorable Asian Baby Overload, Asian Babies With Puppies and even A Halloween Costume Edition. Looks like we’re all out of cute babies, right?

 

Don’t you worry. We noticed one thing in particular with these children who reach social media fame. Many of them have a killer fashion sense. That, or they have parents who understand how much we eat these pictures up. Some people complain that these fashion-heavy photos are simply parents vicariously living through their children by dressing them up to reach viral fame. Others claim that these parents simply enjoy the idea of a well-dressed toddler. Whatever the reason may be, they certainly caught our attention.

Here are kids who make the playground their runway and lower our self-esteem by dressing way better than we ever did during our toddler years.

 

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Problematic Image of The Day: Japanese Show Claims There Are Right & Wrong Ways To Be A Fat Woman

In the United States, the pressure for a woman to be thin is undeniable. Nearly $35 billion a year is spent on weight loss products such as pills, machines and supplements. Everyday advertisements remind us that society has an ideal body weight and we are pressured to try every method to obtain this ideal body image.

This is precisely why it’s striking to discover that Japan places even more pressure on Japanese women. Japan goes to extreme lengths to make sure their citizens are maintaining a slim physique.

Last year, a B&B in Osaka called Lady Share House had the rent of their rooms dependent on the tenant’s weight. The rent would increase with every pound gained and decrease with every pound lost. We can already see the problems which may arise from this tactic. What if someone is in the position of financial hardship and is willing to go to extreme and unhealthy measures  to decrease their rent price?

A week later, a Japanese weight loss app was released which had  “attractive” anime men encourage the user to lose weight. By encourage, I mean these anime characters would say verbally abusive things to the user like, “Fat girl, do some more exercise, okay fattie?”

Every now and then, some Japanese citizens show resistance towards this insane amount of pressure, but these methods can quickly backfire. For instance, La Farfa, a magazine which features only plus-size women, has started to advocate for the term “marshmallow girl.” The aim of the new nickname is to associate chubbiness with cuteness instead of the negative connotations of a nickname like “fatty.” Unfortunately, many readers seemed to dislike the idea of chubby women being associated to food of any kind. One Audrey reader simply stated that they would rather be called fat.

Clearly, good intentions may still be very negative and problematic. This seems to be the case with a Japanese television show pointing out the “right and wrong ways to be a fat girl.”

According to RocketNews24, a Japanese twitter user posted a chart which they saw on a morning television show. The chart distinguished the traits between “OK Chubby” girls and “NG (No Good) Chubby” Girls.


According to the RocketNews24 translation of the chart, the following are considered traits of “OK Chubby” girls:
-Charming and bright smile.
-A big eater.
-Makes an effort an effort to look cute and doesn’t worry about showing skin.
-Clothes are brightly colored.
-Hairstyle and make up is carefully done.

The following are considered traits of “NG (No Good) Chubby” Girls:
-Expressionless and always alone.
-A small eater.
-Clothes are not revealing and attempt to hide figure.
-Only chooses dark clothing.
-Dress like they don’t care or just gave up.


Where to begin? Let’s start with the very big fact that there is no right or wrong way to be chubby. The chart not only makes broad assumptions about women, it’s just plain insulting. How is a woman a “No Good Chubby” simply because she wears dark clothing?

We’re not sure if the chart was trying to be helpful, but it definitely missed its mark. There is no information about the television show which featured the chart, but we certainly hope this was poor taste in humor instead of actual opinion.

 

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Amazing Way Photographer Chino Otsuka Travels Through Time

Imagine how it would be like to meet yourself as a child. What would you say? How would you feel? How much would you have changed?

This is exactly the sort of questions that London-based Japanese photographer, Chino Otsuka, had in mind for her “Imagine Finding Me” series. With a unique and visually stunning method of venturing into her past, the creative photographer travels through time by inserting her current self into images of her childhood self.

The photos show Otsuka at various stages of her life as well as various places around the world. “The digital process becomes a tool, almost like a time machine, as I’m embarking on the journey to where I once belonged and at the same time becoming a tourist in my own history.” Otsuka tells to AGO.

AGO explains that Otsuka utilizes photography to “to explore the fluid relationship between the memory, time and photography.”

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JAPAN 1976 and 2005
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JAPAN 1982 and 2006
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SPAIN 1975 and 2005
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JAPAN 1980 and 2009
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JAPAN 1981 and 2006
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JAPAN 1979 and 2006
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FRANCE 1984 and 2005
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FRANCE 1977 and 2009 
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