Calling All Screenwriters!

Are you an aspiring screenwriter? Do you have material, but need some guidance on how to successfully pitch your project? We’ve got just the thing.

The 14th Annual Coalition for Asian Pacifics in Entertainment (CAPE) New Writers Fellowship is now open for submissions.

The two submission categories are Film and Television. If you are one of the 10 fellows selected, you (or your writing team) will receive $1,000 stipend, intensive 11-session curriculum with industry professionals in Los Angeles from March to April (all finalists must be attend all classes and lab sessions), and exclusive opportunities to meet with successful entertainment agents, managers, producers, and executives.

The deadline to enter is January 31, 2014. For more information, click here.

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Adorable Asian Babies Who Dress Better Than You

Our faithful Audrey readers have made one thing clear to us: they love adorable Asian babies. Of course, we don’t blame them. Who can resist squealing over those round eyes and chubby cheeks?

To appease our readers, we brought you the Adorable Asian Baby Overload, Asian Babies With Puppies and even A Halloween Costume Edition. Looks like we’re all out of cute babies, right?

 

Don’t you worry. We noticed one thing in particular with these children who reach social media fame. Many of them have a killer fashion sense. That, or they have parents who understand how much we eat these pictures up. Some people complain that these fashion-heavy photos are simply parents vicariously living through their children by dressing them up to reach viral fame. Others claim that these parents simply enjoy the idea of a well-dressed toddler. Whatever the reason may be, they certainly caught our attention.

Here are kids who make the playground their runway and lower our self-esteem by dressing way better than we ever did during our toddler years.

 

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Problematic Image of The Day: Japanese Show Claims There Are Right & Wrong Ways To Be A Fat Woman

In the United States, the pressure for a woman to be thin is undeniable. Nearly $35 billion a year is spent on weight loss products such as pills, machines and supplements. Everyday advertisements remind us that society has an ideal body weight and we are pressured to try every method to obtain this ideal body image.

This is precisely why it’s striking to discover that Japan places even more pressure on Japanese women. Japan goes to extreme lengths to make sure their citizens are maintaining a slim physique.

Last year, a B&B in Osaka called Lady Share House had the rent of their rooms dependent on the tenant’s weight. The rent would increase with every pound gained and decrease with every pound lost. We can already see the problems which may arise from this tactic. What if someone is in the position of financial hardship and is willing to go to extreme and unhealthy measures  to decrease their rent price?

A week later, a Japanese weight loss app was released which had  “attractive” anime men encourage the user to lose weight. By encourage, I mean these anime characters would say verbally abusive things to the user like, “Fat girl, do some more exercise, okay fattie?”

Every now and then, some Japanese citizens show resistance towards this insane amount of pressure, but these methods can quickly backfire. For instance, La Farfa, a magazine which features only plus-size women, has started to advocate for the term “marshmallow girl.” The aim of the new nickname is to associate chubbiness with cuteness instead of the negative connotations of a nickname like “fatty.” Unfortunately, many readers seemed to dislike the idea of chubby women being associated to food of any kind. One Audrey reader simply stated that they would rather be called fat.

Clearly, good intentions may still be very negative and problematic. This seems to be the case with a Japanese television show pointing out the “right and wrong ways to be a fat girl.”

According to RocketNews24, a Japanese twitter user posted a chart which they saw on a morning television show. The chart distinguished the traits between “OK Chubby” girls and “NG (No Good) Chubby” Girls.


According to the RocketNews24 translation of the chart, the following are considered traits of “OK Chubby” girls:
-Charming and bright smile.
-A big eater.
-Makes an effort an effort to look cute and doesn’t worry about showing skin.
-Clothes are brightly colored.
-Hairstyle and make up is carefully done.

The following are considered traits of “NG (No Good) Chubby” Girls:
-Expressionless and always alone.
-A small eater.
-Clothes are not revealing and attempt to hide figure.
-Only chooses dark clothing.
-Dress like they don’t care or just gave up.


Where to begin? Let’s start with the very big fact that there is no right or wrong way to be chubby. The chart not only makes broad assumptions about women, it’s just plain insulting. How is a woman a “No Good Chubby” simply because she wears dark clothing?

We’re not sure if the chart was trying to be helpful, but it definitely missed its mark. There is no information about the television show which featured the chart, but we certainly hope this was poor taste in humor instead of actual opinion.

 

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Amazing Way Photographer Chino Otsuka Travels Through Time

Imagine how it would be like to meet yourself as a child. What would you say? How would you feel? How much would you have changed?

This is exactly the sort of questions that London-based Japanese photographer, Chino Otsuka, had in mind for her “Imagine Finding Me” series. With a unique and visually stunning method of venturing into her past, the creative photographer travels through time by inserting her current self into images of her childhood self.

The photos show Otsuka at various stages of her life as well as various places around the world. “The digital process becomes a tool, almost like a time machine, as I’m embarking on the journey to where I once belonged and at the same time becoming a tourist in my own history.” Otsuka tells to AGO.

AGO explains that Otsuka utilizes photography to “to explore the fluid relationship between the memory, time and photography.”

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GET INSPIRED: 4 Years Later, Haiti Can Still Use A Good Neighbor

Earlier this month, Audrey Magazine and KoreAm Journal presented their 12th annual awards gala, Unforgettable. Historically, this event recognized the success of the Korean American community, but in honor of Audrey Magazine’s 10th anniversary, Unforgettable expanded to celebrate the achievements of the entire Pan-Asian community. Not only did we get to take part in this extravagant event, we presented Janet Yang with the very first Audrey Woman of Influence Award.

Aside from the awards, show-stopping performances and incredible food, Unforgettable stood out this year because of the event’s amazing charity partner, Good Neighbors.

Good Neighbors pride themselves in being an international humanitarian organization focusing on child education, community development, health, and disaster relief projects in  30 countries worldwide.

Needless to say, this organization has been doing an incredible amount of work over the years. For example, Good Neighbors has been aiding Haiti since the destructive earthquake in 2010. But now they need your help:

We’ve come a long way in four years.

This Sunday, January 12th, marks the fourth anniversary of Haiti’s catastrophic 7.0 earthquake in 2010. Right after the quake hit, Good Neighbors arrived with an emergency relief team to provide food, water, tents, and medical support to thousands–and ended up staying. Since then, we’ve established an official field office in Port-au-Prince to identify the most urgent projects and focus on community development. In four years, we’ve built 31 new homes for displaced families and two new primary schools for children in Wharf Jeremie, one of the most dangerous slums in the region. The homes currently house 50 families and the schools support 615 children and 27 teachers.

As a new year begins in 2014, we’re centering our attention on the rural village of Oranger, where 300 kids in the community still have no access to an education. The few that do attend school study in makeshift rooms made out of cut cloth and wooden sticks, with no real tables and chairs, and no textbooks. Our goal is to raise $18,000 to build new schools and cover these children’s tuition, supplies, and lunchtime meals. We believe that giving Haiti a fresh starts begins with giving every child an education. 

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CrowdRise Campaign:

Nelson Mandela said that “education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.” Every child has the right to a basic education and Project Promise300 will help us provide this to 300 children in the village of Oranger, Haiti.

 

In April 2011, Good Neighbors completed two schools in Cite Soleil and Wharf Jeremie, two destitute areas in Port-au-Prince where the majority of the population is illiterate and live in extreme poverty. These schools have since provided children ages 4-18 with primary school education, nutritious lunchtime meals, school supplies and uniforms.

Our plan is to expand these educational opportunities into the village of Oranger, where there are no schools built yet and only a few dozen children currently attend class in makeshift classrooms made from wooden sticks and cut cloth. By supporting Project Promise300, you’ll help us build new schools, provide school supplies, uniforms and meals, and hire teachers and principals. Help us enroll 300 children who are waiting to start their education, so they can create the future that Haiti deserves.

http://www.crowdrise.com/gnusa-haiti

 

 

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Top 5 Reasons We Love Variety’s 2014 Breakthrough Actress OLIVIA MUNN

Variety‘s Breakthrough of the Year Awards celebrates and recognizes rising stars in entertainment and technology. This year, the awards ceremony took place at the Consumer Electronics Show in Vegas.

Much of our attention was focused on Variety’s 2014 Breakthrough Actress Winner, Olivia Munn. The 33-year-old half-Chinese actress has been on our radar for quite some time. Thankfully, the world is taking notice.

Munn is most known for her roles in films such as Iron Man 2 and Magic Mike as well as her roles on television shows such as The Daily Show and New Girl.

Although she is considered a “rising star,” she has captivated the hearts of her fans for years. Don’t know her yet? Now’s the time. Here are our Top 5 Reasons We Love Olivia Munn.

 


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1. She never gave up on her dreams.
In a 2011 interview with Audrey Magazine, Munn admits that when she first told her mother she wanted to be an actress, her mother adamantly disagreed and insisted that she become a lawyer.

In fact, her mother wasn’t the only one who doubted Munn’s choice of acting. Initially, Munn found her dreams difficult to follow. Her unique look and Asian eyes originally caused her to feel doubtful.

But Munn didn’t give up on her dreams. In fact, it all made her work harder to prove to everyone (including herself) that she was capable. “I told myself, my bar will always be higher than what I was doing at the time. Then if I reached that one, I would make another higher one, and another one,” she says. “I’ve worked hard for a long time [so I could] tell myself, I’ll never be the reason I hear no.”


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2. She overcame social pressures.
Munn spent much of her childhood moving around. She was born in Oklahoma, but spent a large portion of her childhood in Tokyo, Japan. Needless to say, she found it difficult to fit in.

According to Refinery29, Munn tried to change her appearance to be accepted by her peers. “I wore men’s clothing a lot in high school because I wanted to hide behind baggy pants and T-shirts. When I moved from Japan to Oklahoma at 16 I tried to go more preppy to fit in. I ditched my skater clothes but I just ended up looking like some weird girl desperately trying to fit in. The kids in school would be wearing sweater vests from Gap, but we couldn’t afford brand new clothes so I would borrow my grandmother’s linty, moth-eaten sweater vests and not realise how much of a sore thumb I looked like.”

But as expected, she overcame this need to fit in. “When you’re always the new girl, it forces you to come up with new ways to make friends,” Munn tells Audrey Magazine, “because every time you go somewhere, it’s literally the same battle. Eventually with me, once I built up so much scar tissue, I didn’t have to worry so much about becoming popular or being welcomed or being accepted.”


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3. Her strong relationship with her fans.
Over the years, Munn has gathered quite a handful of loyal fans and has proven that she doesn’t allow fame to get to her head. Her fan club is called OMFGs (Olivia Munn Fan Group) and Munn has been known to be extremely generous and kind to her dedicated fans.  In an interview with US Magazine, Munn has stated that she owes everything she has to her loyal fan group, OMFG.

“They’re amazing. I’m very lucky. It’s a really good feeling to know they have my back,” says Munn. ““They put me on this ride. They’re coming along for the ride.”

 


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4. She’s a published author.
Although Munn pursued her dream of becoming an actress despite her mother’s initial sentiments about the career, the last thing Munn wanted to do was go against her mother’s will. Munn admits that no matter what, she needed her mother’s approval before making big decisions like moving to Hollywood.

To satisfy her mother, she graduated from the University of Oklahoma with a journalism degree and work for a year at a local television station before moving west.

Although Munn is now a successful actress, she still put her degree to good use and became a published author. Suck It, Wonder Woman: The Misadventures of a Hollywood Geek, was released on July 6, 2010.

 


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5. She’s an Audrey Magazine covergirl.
The beautiful Olivia Munn graced our Spring 2011 cover. Check out the must-read cover story here.

 

You Won’t Believe How They Paid For Their Son’s Tuition

With the rising cost of education, many families are left wondering if they can even afford to send their children off to college. The Asian community, however, is known to endure many obstacles in order to ensure an education for their children. Why? College is seen as a necessary step towards a better life- one in which parents will do nearly anything to achieve.

This appears to be the case for Jiagu Zhu and Jianying Liu, a couple in Hengyang, China. The couple realized early on that they would have to work hard to get their children into college in hopes of an easier future. To reach their dream the husband and wife rented a factory unit  in 2004 and got to work.

How was the determined couple planning to send their sons to college? By collecting and recycling over 180kg of plastic (about 7,000 plastic bottles) each day.

According to RocketNews24, the couple must both work tirelessly everyday to make a living. Mr. Jiagu Zhu rides through the streets on his tricycle and alleys to collect discarded plastic and Mrs. Jianying Liu separates and cleans the collected bottles.

“Having it tough is a fortune in disguise, as after the bitter times there will be sweet times. After putting in hard work, you’ll reap good results. We’re countrymen, there’s nothing we’re afraid of. We’re not afraid of leading a hard life, we’re not afraid of exhausting work, we can carve out a happy life with our bare hands,” says Mr. Zhu.

After ten years of hard work, the couple has been able to send both their sons to college and one to Germany to pursue his PhD. To them, all their hard work was entirely worth it.

 

The Daily SHAG: Mario Maurer

If there’s anyone that has the right to be called a SHAG (Smoking Hot Asian Guy), that would have to be Mario Maurer.

This 25-year-old Thai German actor and model is actually of Chinese and German decent. At the age of 16, Maurer began his modeling career, but it wasn’t until 2007 that he was thrown into fame with his lead role in The Love of Siam. The film received critical acclaim and dominated in Thailand’s 2007 film awards season. Maurer’s portrayal of the character Tong gained him the Best Actor award in Southeast Asian film category at the 10th Cinemanila International Film Festival, Best Actor Award for the Starpics Awards and a nomination for Best Supporting Actor in the Asian Film Awards at the Hong Kong International Film Festival.

Maurer is also known for his roles in First Love and as the lead role in Thailand’s highest grossing film of all time, Pee Mak, which has earned more than $33 million in revenue worldwide.

The Thai actor has also been gaining quite a bit of popularity in the Philippines for his role in the 2012 Filipino Thai romantic comedy romantic film, Suddenly It’s Magic. In an interview with Philippine Inquirer, Maurer discussed his good experience working in the Philippines.

“There are not many differences, except… in Thailand, it’s easier for me to get acquainted with coworkers. When I did “Suddenly,” I had to use my second language (English). But the Filipinos never let me feel I was from a different place. I was happy to work with them,” he remarked. When asked if he would consider working there again, Maurer replied, “Yes, of course. If I find time, I’ll come back-no problem. But first I want to speak better Filipino. It’s a very cute language.”

Polite, hardworking AND attractive? Mario Maurer clearly deserves to be our Daily SHAG.

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Check out our most popular SHAGs of 2013 here!

Can You Spot The Difference? Unnecessary Edits For Mindy Kaling’s ELLE Magazine Cover

February 2014 is Elle’s annual Women in TV issue. They’ve decided to feature four of television’s top celebrities: Zooey Deschanel, Amy Poehler, Allison Williams and Audrey Magazine Winter 2011-12  covergirl, Mindy Kaling. The four actresses all received their very own cover. This is reason to rejoice, right? An Asian American actress is finally being ranked equally in mainstream media!

But wait. Is she?

It doesn’t take much effort to spot the blatant difference between Kaling’s cover compared to the others. Many upset readers have pointed out the very obvious difference that Kaling’s cover is the only one black and white. Sure, the actress still looks stunning, but why are the other women not also in black and white? Why did they feel the need to take away the color of the one woman who was not Caucasian?

Other readers have pointed out that while the other three actresses received full-body covers, Kaling’s cover is a cropped close up.

Is it a coincidence? Is it just chance that Kaling (who happens to not fit the stereotypical body size of American actresses) is the only one who doesn’t receive a full body cover? Is it mere coincidence that the one person of color gets the black and white photo? Did they simply fail to notice that the other three photos are consistent and similar while Kaling’s is not?

Tell us what you think.

 

CONTROVERSY ALERT: Tiger Mom Claims “Some Races Are Superior”

Amy Chua is no stranger to controversy. In 2011, she gained the nickname “Tiger Mom” through her book Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother which advocated for a strict “Chinese” parenting style as well her belief that Chinese mothers are superior.

Now, she’s making headlines once again by taking that belief one step further.

Chua, a Chinese American law professor at Yale, joins forces with husband Jed Rubenfeld to write The Triple Package. The point of this book? To prove that certain groups of people are superior because they have innate qualities that make them more likely to succeed in life.

The Triple Package lists these groups as most likely to succeed in America: Jewish, Indian, Chinese, Iranian, Lebanese-Americans, Nigerians, Cuban exiles and Mormons. As the title indicates, the duo believe that these cultural groups have three traits in common which make them inherently more superior than others: a superiority complex, insecurity and impulse control.

“Mormons have recently risen to astonishing business success,” the authors write. “Cubans in Miami climbed from poverty to prosperity in a generation. Nigerians earn doctorates at stunningly high rates. Indian and Chinese Americans have much higher incomes than other Americans; Jews may have the highest of all.”

According to NYDailyNews, the book also explains why some cultural groups, including African Americans, “might not have what it takes to reach the top.”

The authors seem to recognize that they are making rather controversial claims, but are standing by their work. The books publisher, Penguin Press, released a statement yesterday in support of The Triple Package.

“We are proud to be publishing ‘The Triple Package’ in February and we look forward to a thoughtful discussion about the book and success in America,” the statement read.

Although the book will not hit shelves until February, it has already gathered a handful of criticism (for obvious reasons) from critics and public alike.

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