Audrey Magazine Is Looking For A Part-Time Staff Writer!


Audrey Magazine is looking to hire a part-time staff writer for its online magazine! Here’s your chance to gain experience at an award-winning, national publication that covers Asian Fashion, Beauty, Trends and Entertainment. We’re looking for creative writers who have a strong interest in the Asian/Asian American community. This job is based in our Los Angeles office.


-Time commitment of 25 – 30 hours a week
-Must be able to come into our Los Angeles office at least three times per week. No telecommuting.
-Write, edit and produce 9 – 12 stories per week
-Help spread Audrey content through social media (Facebook, twitter, instagram, etc.)
-Help maintain Audrey website as well as Audrey social media platforms
-Weekly brainstorm meetings
-Manage weekly newsletter
-Keep track of website numbers and trends
-Create banners and visual content using Photoshop


Ideal candidates:
-Have a strong passion for the Asian/Asian American community
-Are detail-oriented and able to multitask
-Have strong writing and editing skills
-Must be self-motivated and willing to take initiative
-Have a strong social media presence and understanding of social media platforms
-Must have experience with WordPress, Photoshop and Google Analytics
-Prior experience in a similar environment preferred
-Related college degree preferred



To apply send an email cover letter, resume and three writing samples (blog posts OK) to

Thailand Creates Art Exhibit For The Blind and Visually Impaired


The Thai Ministry of Tourism joined forces with Thai universities such as Chulalongkorn University and Silpakorn University to fulfill a single goal: To create a space where the visually impaired could experience art the same way others do.

Admittedly, many of us take our vision for granted when it comes to art. We forget that much of the beauty found in art exhibits — paintings, photographs and sculptures with giant “do not touch” signs in front– are only available to those of us with sight.

Well not anymore. In fact, you can kiss that “do not touch sign” goodbye.

Found in Chiang Mai, Thailand, a pilot project called “‘Feel the Happiness: Art for the Blind” aims to promote equality in the country by creating a space in which the blind and visually impaired can experience the country’s famous landmarks through feeling. For instance, there are bells in the shape of Buddha which can appeal to the sense of touch and the sense of hearing.

They hope to have artists create more sculptured and interactive artwork to be placed at Thailand’s tourist sites that allow the blind and visually impaired to experience the art.

Read more about this inspiring project here.


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Controversy Over Miranda Kerr’s Vogue Japan Photoshoot: Cultural Appropriation vs. Cultural Appreciation


Miranda Kerr is certainly no stranger to Japan. This time last year, the 31-year-old Australian model attracted quite a bit of attention for her odd, Japanese detergent commercials. Well it looks like she’s back and this time, she’s on the cover of the special 15th anniversary November issue of Vogue Japan.

While this excited many Kerr fans, much of that excitement was replaced with confusion when shots from the photo shoot were released. It was immediately clear that the actress was dressed to look like a geisha, a samurai and even an anime character. Of course, this begs the question: Where is the line between cultural appropriation and cultural appreciation, and what does this categorize as?

Most seem to be leaning towards cultural appropriation. Angry netizens question why a Japanese model wasn’t used for the 15th anniversary issue of  Vogue Japan. After all, the magazine is a Japanese-language magazine. Despite Kerr’s undeniable popularity in Japan, Japanese readers have been shaking their heads in disapproval of the choice to have a foreigner in “Japanese-inspired” outfits.



However, others have come to Kerr’s defense including the photographer of the photo shoot, Mario Testino. In response to the controversy he explained, “I wanted to represent ancient and modern Japan with these three characters. Japan has geisha and samurai, as well as manga, and I hoped to express these themes through Miranda to the Japanese people.”

Some Kerr fans have even used cosplay as an example of cultural appreciation and note that race does not matter when avid fans dress up as their favorite anime or comicbook character. They argue that this photo shoot does the same. To others, the rebuttal for this argument is simple: this is not cosplay. This is a magazine which creates influence and for some, shapes beauty standards.

Kerr has not released her opinion on the matter, but she has been putting up photos on her Instagram since earlier this month.

Check them out below and give us your verdict. Is this cultural appropriation or cultural appreciation?

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MC JIN Discusses Upcoming Album Release & His Role in “Revenge Of The Green Dragons”


His family and friends know him as Jin Au-Yeung, but you probably know him as MC Jin, former Ruff Ryder and Park Freestyle Friday legend.

Jin already has quite a number of accomplishments under his belt. He released his debut album The Rest is History back in 2004 and began his acting career in 2 Fast 2 Furious. The artist then took his talent to Asia where he captivated the music industry and starred in a number of Chinese films and television spots.

Well now Jin is back in the US and in a big way. His first full length album in the U.S. titled XIV:LIX will be released on October 19th (check out the first single off XIV:LIX titled “Chinese New Year” below) and Jin also has a role in the upcoming Martin Scorsese film Revenge Of The Green Dragons.

Luckily for us, MC Jin took some time out of his busy schedule to talk to us and tell us more about what’s to come:



Audrey Magazine: So you began rapping in Middle school. Can you tell us more about that and what inspired you?
MC JIN: Initially, I was spending most of my time emulating the rappers I admired. Looking in the mirror, using a comb as a microphone rapping along line for line, I envisioned myself as LL Cool J. Then when I heard of two young guys named Kriss Kross, it dawned on me that kids could do this too. At that point, I started crafting my own lyrics and next thing you know I found myself engaging in rap cyphers at school.

AM: As a young rapper, what were the sort of things you discussed in your music?
MCJ: I would say the subject matter was pretty standard for the typical mind of a pre-teen. The lyrics didn’t stray too far from things like how boring I thought school was or the girl I had a crush on. For the most part, it mostly revolved around how great of a rapper I was, or thought I was.

AM:  What gave you the idea to include Cantonese words in your freestyle verses?
MCJ: That wasn’t something that happened until way later in my journey. When I did start doing it, it was more out of fun then to make a statement of any sort. It is interesting to note that from early on, it never crossed my mind what it would look like to actually write and perform in Cantonese. Who would’ve known that at some point down the line, I’d be doing both in Hong Kong on a scale beyond my imagination.

AM:  Did your family and friends always support your career choice?
MCJ: From the moment I made it know that this was my passion and career path choice, it was safe to say that no one was supportive. In the earliest stages, it did feel like I was the only one who believed in this dream. Eventually, both family and my circle of friends came around but to this day, it still feels like a dream. All I can say is, I’ve been extremely blessed to be able to do what I’m passionate about for a living this past decade plus.

AM:  What’s the difference between performing in the U.S and in Asia? Which do you prefer?
MCJ: I don’t really have a preference. Wherever I have an opportunity to share my story and do what I love on stage, I am grateful. As for differences, there are the obvious such as language and certain cultural elements. The more I think about it though, we are more similar than anything else.

AM:  Tell us how you got into acting.
MCJ: My first big screen experience that people would have knowledge of would probably be the second Fast & Furious film. This was over 10 years ago mind you. It’s encouraging to know people still remember that..
As for how that came about, you can say it was just being in the right place at the right time. The record label that I was signed with made a few calls and got me a casting audition with the director. I went and ended up getting the role. The few years that I spent in Hong Kong definitely opened my eyes to the craft and art of acting, through the tv and film projects that I had the opportunity to partake in.

AM:  Do you have a preference between acting or rapping?
MCJ: Both platforms allow me to express myself in unique ways and I find that I still have lots to learn and grow in regarding both.

AM:  Tell us about the single “Chinese New Year.” What’s the message and what inspired you to create this song?
MCJ: At the core of it, “Chinese New Year” is about acknowledging our cultural differences however celebrating together, in the fact that we are really all the same in the bigger picture. In that sense, everyday is Chinese New Year.

AM:  What’s the overall feel of XIV:LIX?
MCJ: It is definitely my most authentic, sincere and heartfelt album of all the projects I’ve released in the past decade. More than great music, what I hope listeners take away from the album is a true insight into the heart and soul of Jin Au-Yeung.

AM:  Can you tell us a bit more about your role in the Martin Scorsese film Revenge Of The Green Dragons?
MCJ: I play a young detective named Tang trying to take down the Green Dragons. It’s a minor role but I am super grateful for the opportunity, as it was an extreme learning experience. To be challenged and stretched is always a great thing.

AM:  What can we expect from you in the future?
MCJ: Depending on how the XIV:LIX album does, you might either see me making more music touring the world.. or I might be making you a soy latte at your local Starbucks.



Talented DIY Bride Makes Her Own Wedding Dress For Only $30


These days, DIY weddings are definitely the latest trend. Soon-to-be brides have invaded craft stores everywhere looking for candles, mason jars and ribbon. But one bride has decided to take this DIY trend to the next level.

Seattle bride Chi Kreneta decided that she would test her crochet skills on something that many women spend years dreaming of: her wedding dress. The talented crocheter utilized her 50-minute bus commute each day to work on the gown of her dreams. The beautiful, floor-length gown features cap sleeves, an empire silhouette and uses a common pineapple stitch throughout. Chi Kreneta simply wore the piece over a white slip, accented it with a ribbon and voilà, her masterpiece was complete!

Although the dress took 5 months of hard work, it’s clear that it all paid off. Best of all, the materials to create the dress only cost a total of $30.

“I crochet a lot on the bus during my commute and have made other things like hats, scarves, and shorter dresses,” Kreneta told ABC News. “I knew I wanted to design and make my own wedding dress (I also sew) and figured that crocheting it would be the most efficient way to accomplish.”

Additionally, Kreneta points out that the dress is in honor of her late grandmother who taught her how to crochet as a child.

Check out the impressive time lapse video below!




7-Year-Old Cellist Justin Yu Meets Ellen, Charms His Way Into Our Hearts


I don’t know about you, but at the age of 3, I was probably spending my days watching cartoons, drinking out of juice boxes and trying to figure out how on earth people colored inside the lines. What was Jun Justin Yu doing at 3? Learning how to play the cello.

Justin Yu is the son of Chinese composer and conductor Ziliang and Korean pianist Rho Aera. After learning how to play the cello, it wasn’t long before Yu went beyond the wildest dreams of any musical parent. After being accepted into the Herald Music School gift class, Yu performed in a number prestigious venues and most impressive of all, he made his debut in Carnegie Hall in 2012. Of course, he did this all before the age of 6. Now at the age of 7, Yu has been accepted by the Manhattan School of Music as one of the youngest cellist in school’s history.

On September 24th, Yu made an appearance on The Ellen DeGeneres Show to give us a taste of his breath-taking skills. As it turns out, this young prodigy not only has an incredible amount of talent, he also has an incredible amount of personality.

Yu quickly charmed his way into our hearts with his large facial expressions and adorable stories. He talked Ellen’s ears off about everything from his boring plane ride to his hilarious victory dance.

Check it out for yourself. Trust us when we say this will be the best 4 minutes of your day.



World’s 10 Most Followed Asian Female Celebrities on Twitter (September 2014)

1. Indonesian entertainer Agnes Monica (@agnezmo) — 11.3M followers


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2. Indonesian singer Sherina Munaf (@sherinasinna) — 8.17M followers


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3. Japanese-Swiss-Polish Brazilian TV personality Sabrina Sato Rahal (@SabrinaSatoReal) — 8.09M followers


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4. Indonesian actress Luna Maya (@LunaMaya26)– 7.83M followers


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5. Bollywood actress Deepika Padukone (@deepikapadukone) — 7.35M followers

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6. Filipina Australian entertainer Anne Curtis-Smith (@annecurtissmith) — 7.11M followers


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7. Bollywood entertainer Priyanka Chopra (@priyankachopra) — 7.06M followers


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8. Indonesian actress Shireen Sungkar (@shireensungkar) — 5.69M followers


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9. Filipina actress Angel Locsin (@143redangel) — 5.07M followers


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10. Filipina American entertainer Nicole Scherzinger (@NicoleScherzy) — 4.99M followers


Information provided by 
Did we miss someone? Don’t be shy! Tell us if there’s anyone that should be on this list!




Words Can Be Weapons: Powerful Chinese Campaign Links Teenage Crime to Emotional Abuse


It’s scary to think that a number of parents and adults don’t realize they verbally abuse children. It’s even scarier once we take a look at the potential consequences of this abuse. Some adults think they simply get carried away with anger when they scold their children, but they fail to realize that physical abuse is not the only way to harm a child.

In China, the number of juvenile crimes has doubled in recent years and when the Center For Psychological Research went to investigate this, they stumbled upon a disturbing realization: juvenile crime is directly tied to childhood emotional abuse.

“Verbal abuse of children is like setting off a time bomb. It explodes only much later, long after the original perpetrator has left the scene. And it is society that pays the price, as is evident from the rising rate of juvenile crime,” explained Juggi Ramakrishnan, executive creative director of the advertising agency Ogilvy and Mather. “We really needed to tell this ‘cycle-of-violence’ story in a way that will make people sit up and take notice.”

And so they did.

Words Can Be Weapons,” a multimedia campaign based in China, interviewed six teenagers in Shenyang Detention Center. During these interviews, the teenagers revealed the harsh words that were said to them as children. They were told that they were useless, garbage, morons, and in one extreme case, a mother constantly told her son to “go away and die.”

The campaign takes the words that haunted these teenagers and literally transforms them into the weapon which the teens used to commit their crimes. The message here is clear: these harsh words are weapons in disguise.

Take a look at the powerful video below.



Official English Trailer for Studio Ghibli’s “The Tale of The Princess Kaguya”


It’s less than a month away until Studio Ghibli fans get what they’ve been waiting for for an entire year! The Tale of Princess Kaguya was released last year in Japan, but the much-anticipated English language version will not hit theaters until October 17th.

This new film from Studio Ghibli (the people that brought you Spirited Away and My Neighbor Totoro and Kiki’s Delivery Service) is based on the classic Japanese folktale The Tale of the Bamboo Cutter. According to the folktale, a bamboo cutter discovers a small child in a stalk of bamboo. This baby eventually becomes the beautiful Princess Kaguya.


The English language version of the film has quite a star-studded cast. Directed by Isao Takahata, the film features the voice talents of Chloë Grace Moretz as the princess and James Caan as the Bamboo Cutter, as well as Filipino American actor Darren Criss, Chinese American actress Lucy Liu as Lady Sagami, Korean American actors Daniel Dae Kim and John Cho, and Japanese American actor Dean Cain.

The official English language trailer has finally been uploaded onto YouTube. Check it out for yourself and be sure to catch this film in theaters next month!




Top Stories: Why We Love Steven Yeun From “The Walking Dead” & Kimiko Glenn From “Orange is The New Black”



Here are our Top 5 stories of the month!




top 1
1. Top 5 Reasons We Love Glenn from “The Walking Dead” (READ HERE)


top 2
2) Find Out Why We Love Kimiko Glenn, The “Orange is the New Black” Actress Behind Brook Soso (READ HERE)


top 3
3)  Ki Hong Lee’s Debut Film “The Maze Runner” Premieres Today (READ HERE)


top 4
4) “Sorry to keep you waiting, boys” — Sanrio Launches Hello Kitty Men (READ HERE)


top 5
5) “The Real” Host Jeannie Mai Talks Divorce, Plastic Surgery, Fashion and More (READ HERE)