Korean American Michelle Wie Wins The U.S. Open

Story by Julie Ha. 

She did it. Michelle Wie just scored the biggest win of her career.

The 24-year-old golfer won the U.S. Women’s Open at Pinehurst, with a two-shot victory over the No. 1-ranked Stacy Lewis.

“Oh my gosh, I can’t believe this is happening,” Wie said on NBC, reacting to the career milestone.

Anyone who’s followed Wie’s roller coaster career, which began which so much promise and anticipation, but didn’t always produce the big wins, will appreciate the significance of this victory for the Korean American, who began playing golf at age 4. In today’s play, the Stanford graduate displayed the maturity of a champion, after recovering from  a late double-bogey 6 on the 16th hole and nailing a 25-foot birdie putt on the 17th.

One NBC golf commentator summed it up, remarking, “We’ve been talking about Michelle Wie forever—the ups and downs … This is a pretty cool moment.”

Wie seems to be on a roll, making her previous, four-year winless streak a thing of the past. In April, she won the LPGA LOTTE Championship in her home state of Hawaii, which was her first LPGA victory since 2010.

Photo via Getty Images.

This story was originally published on iamkoream.com.

Dessert Lovers Rejoice: The Churro Ice Cream Sandwich is Here

Story by Ruth Kim. 

Sugar, spice, and everything (n)ice–Churro Borough is the new kid on the block bringing Los Angelenos the perfect summer dessert: the churro ice cream sandwich.

Created by Los Angeles chef Sylvia Yoo, Churro Burough is a guerrilla operation that’s been around since 2011. Inspired by the culture of Los Angeles street food and art, as well as the idea of serving the masses, the dessert pop-up is raiding the streets of L.A. with its handcrafted churro ice cream sandwiches. Their motto? “Pastry propaganda. Guerrilla goodies.” Now that’s bad-ass.

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Yoo, who enrolled in culinary school in New York in 2007, has been around some of the most intense kitchens in the Big Apple, including Jean-Georges and WD-50. After moving back to New York, she attempted to balance working at an interior design firm and as a chef at Red Medicine, but the pressure was too much to handle. She decided to take matters into her own hands.

“When I moved back to LA, it was the beginning of the ice cream boom, with places like Carmela and Sweet Rose opening shop. Working in pastry, ice cream was always my favorite thing to make and eat. I had dreams of running my own business, but I knew I needed my product to stand out,” Yoo told Chow.

Well, she’s certainly made a huge splash in the L.A. ice cream scene, with some claiming that the churro ice cream sandwich could be the “worthy cronut successor”. The perfect crispy exterior of the flattened churro “cookies,” hugging a bed of velvety, delicious ice cream certainly seems pretty irresistible. Daily flavors includevanilla custard, horchata, Mexican hot chocolate, and Spanish latte; seasonal flavors are orange creamsicle, panna cotta, caramel apple pie, strawberry buttermilk, and peach cobbler. According to Chow, Yoo makes all of the products herself. Ice cream shakes with churro dipping fries and Churrons (churro-flavored macaroons) are in the works as well. (Be right back–I’m crying tears of joy.)

Since Churro Borough is a guerrilla establishment, you’ll need to stay posted on their pop-up whereabouts. Yoo and her delectable sandwiches will be at the LA Street Food Festival at the Rose Bowl on June 28 and at Tasting Table’s Lobster Rumble West on August 1.

Photos via Churro Borough’s Instagram

This story was originally published on iamkoream.com

Summer Must-Have: Origami Skirts

Story by Jeline Abutin. 

Amp up the average A-line flowy skirt for a crisp, structured origami skirt this summer!

Flowy skirts are fun and easy to wear, but can get a little repetitive. Take your love of the feminine skirt to a haute and edgy look by getting your hands on a skirt with more shape.

Pleats and geometric angled structured skirts can make your overall outfit polished with a hint of street style.

Pair your structured skirt with a Moto jacket to add shape to your upper torso for a tough but fem look. Not in the mood for too much structure? Pair your skirt with a simple t-shirt to make your skirt the center of the outfit.

We’ve all seen the infamous Zara skort worn by celebs like Kylie Jenner and Giuliana Rancic. Listed below are some affordable alternatives from Forever21 and Pacsun!

1). Forever 21 – Favorite Floral Origami Skirt: $17.80
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2). Forever 21 – Posh Origami Skirt: $14.06
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3). Pacsun – Finders Keepers Last Call Skirt: On Sale $69.99
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4). Pacsun – Finders Keepers Oblivion Skirt: On Sale $67.49
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Jenn Im’s Summer Casual Looks

Story by Jeline Abutin. 

Is the summer heat making your outfit choices on the casual side? Not to worry, Jenn Im of ClothesEncounters has just the write mix of casual and chic outfits for this summer!

Our number one fashion blogger on our list of “25 Asian Youtubers You Should Check Out,” Jenn Im provides her viewers with cute outfits for any occasion.

Watch her styling video from her YouTube channel below!

Judy Joo’s Korean Food Made Simple

Story by Ada Tseng.

The Cooking Channel’s Korean Food Made Simple, hosted by Korean American chef Judy Joo, is the latest installment of a culinary television series that previously included Mexican Food Made Simple and Chinese Food Made Simple. Part travelogue, part how-to guide, Korean Food Made Simple sent Joo all over Korea to gather inspiration, from fish markets in Seoul and the streets of Busan to the small islands off the coast of Korea. (“I’ve been to more places in Korea than my relatives, who have lived there their entire lives!” says Joo.) After exploring different foods around the country, she returned to London, where she’s been based for the last several years, to show audiences how to re-create Korean flavors in a regular home kitchen.

Joo was thrilled when she was approached to do Korean Food Made Simple, as she’s proud of her heritage and has brought a lot of Korean influences to the menu at the Playboy Club London, where she has been the executive chef since it opened in 2011. Some of the dishes that appear on the show — like the Spicy Mussels with Bacon and the Steamed Ginger Infused Sea Bass with Zucchini — have actually been served at the Playboy Club. “We also make our own kimchi at the Club,” says Joo. “And we have a version of the Korean fried chicken in our sports bar.”

Growing up in New Jersey, Joo was no stranger to the local disco fries or fast fixes at Taco Bell, but she mostly ate Korean food at home. Her mother taught her how to cook authentic Korean food, but she jokes that helping out in the kitchen as a kid felt more like slave labor than fun.

“This was when there was nothing pre-made,” says Joo. “So it’d be me and my sister in front of a mound of meat making dumplings. I remember brushing sheets and sheets of dried seaweed with oil, salting them and then having to fry them. Then going to the garden to pick sesame leaves. It felt like chores.

“Also, [traditionally] you’re supposed to cook each vegetable separately to keep it from getting infected by other ingredients,” continues Joo. “And you want to keep the integrity of the color, so if the vegetable is light, you’re not supposed to use soy sauce. But no one has time to cook seven different vegetables separately in one pan to make one dish!” She laughs. “So I say, just cook it all together, and if the carrots are a little brown, it’ll be OK.”

She also shares tips and shortcuts for any home cook who might not live near a Korean market. For example, if you can’t find mirin, a sweet rice wine that is common in Korean cooking, Joo says it’s perfectly fine to substitute Sprite or 7-Up. And if you can’t find thinly sliced beef, partially freeze it and cut it with a knife. “I don’t think that you have to be completely authentic or traditional in order for people to get a good taste of a cuisine,” says Joo. “Food is always dynamic. Food in Korea has changed tremendously in the past years and decades. It’s like languages; it’s always evolving.”

One of Joo’s favorite meals to serve at a dinner party is do-it-yourself kimbap. Instead of pre-rolling the Korean sushi prior to guests arriving, Joo gives each guest their own squares of seaweed and lets them make their own. Joo is also a big fan of do-it-yourself bibimbap, where she encourages guests to choose their own vegetables for the mixed rice dish.

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Judy Joo with Seoul chef and restaurateur Lucia Cho.

Though Joo is now a recognizable TV food personality — she is one of the few who can claim to have been on Iron Chef as a competitor, an official Iron Chef (the only woman in the Iron Chef UK lineup) and a judge — her road to success was a winding one. Born to a physician father and a chemist mother, Joo initially aspired to a career in the sciences and ended up working in banking for many years before she had what she calls her What Color Is Your Parachute? moment and began to soul-search about what she really wanted to do with her life.

“My parents were not thrilled,” says Joo of the prospect of her giving up her prestigious gig on Wall Street. But to contextualize, she grew up in a stereotypically overachieving Asian American household where her parents were also “not thrilled” when she only got into Columbia and not Yale, where her sister went. She toyed with the idea of joining the Peace Corps (“My dad was like, ‘Why do you do that? That’s why I left North Korea!’”), but eventually enrolled in the French Culinary Institute in New York. Soon after relocating to London with her husband, she ended up working at Gordon Ramsay’s restaurant and worked her way up from there.

But it wasn’t until she got into television that her parents started to understand the significance of her new career path. “When I got invited to the Blue House in Korea —the White House of Korea — that’s when my parents were like, ‘Oh, maybe you are doing something interesting and important,’” she says. “That’s when they realized I wasn’t just a line cook, I guess.”

Episodes of Korean Food Made Simple can be seen on the Cooking Channel, and a cookbook with recipes featured on the show will be available next year. 

This story was originally published in our Summer 2014 issue. Get your copy here

This Summer’s Trending Footwear: Birkenstocks

Story by Jeline Abutin. 

Love them or hate them, Birks just work. To some, these sandals are clunky and old fashion. To others, they are a fashion must-have. Regardless of what side you’re on, Birkenstocks are a staple in this summer’s wardrobe.

Seen in runway shows such as the Celine Spring 2013 Fashion Show, Birkenstocks are back and are a comfy and chic alternative to gladiator sandals or flip-flops.

Coming in different styles, Arizona Birks are trending among fellow fashion bloggers as well as fashion enthusiasts.

Arizona Birkenstocks can be paired with just about anything — from summer dresses to boyfriend jeans and everything in-between. Easy to wear and easy to pair with outfits, the only bad thing about Birks is the awkward tan received from wearing them almost everyday.

 


Must have colors for this summer trend is black and also white. But don’t be hesitant to try other colors to add a vibrant and fun aspect to any outfit!

With a hefty price tag of $89 to $130, Birks can be a splurge, especially for sandals, but are so worth it for its versatility, comfort, and stylishness! But if you’re willing to partake in this fashion endeavor, don’t forget to paint those toenails to add a feminine touch to these must-haves!

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What’s Your Summer Style: Wide-Leg Trousers

Story by Jeline Abutin. 

Striving for a comfortable and a fashion savvy outfit essential? Look no further than the wide-leg trouser.

Printed or a solid pattern, the wide-leg trouser has the ease and relaxation of pajama bottoms with its silk material, but can be worn at the mall or out with girlfriends on those lazy days.

Try to find a pair that flows away from the thighs and calves but still hugs the waist or hips to still give shape to the body.

Check out this wardrobe piece and all its versatility in Topshop’s Five Ways to Wear the Wide Leg Trouser.


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Facing the Big 3-0 … Single

Story by Kanara Ty. 

When you’re programmed to believe happiness equals marriage and kids by 30 — and they’re nowhere in sight — what’s a 29-year-old (and her angst-ridden mother) to do? 

When I was in college, my mother found out I was seeing somebody for the first time. So she did the one thing that comes most naturally to her: she confided in a fortuneteller. I’m not talking about Miss Cleo and her crystal ball; more like a Buddhist monk at the local temple. It was something she grew obsessive about because, every week, she would tell me a new fortune.

I heard fortunes ranging from “He told me that the best guy for you is the one I pick for you” to “You should graduate first before you fall in love with someone” — which led me to question whether she was actually confiding in someone else or, really, just herself.

But then one week, there came a fortune that was really specific and struck a chord with me: “When you turn 26, you will meet three guys. The third guy will be the one you marry — and you will be married by 27.”

I became obsessed with the idea, even more so than my mother. I scrutinized everything about myself at the time (my looks, my body, my career) and I became a bit of a H.A.M. — a Hot Asian Mess. My mom added on to my own over-scrutinizing by constantly bombarding me with questions like “Are you a good enough catch?” “Are you appealing enough to men?” Rather than letting fate take its course, I was determined to see that fortune come true.

When I turned 26, I did indeed meet three guys — all of which turned out to be men I’d never marry even if you’d paid me. But up until that point, I believed I was going to be betrothed, have a wonderful career and even think seriously about having a couple of kids. All before I turned 30. It wasn’t just my dream, but a shared dream among my friends. That dream stemmed mainly from our immigrant parents’ expectations because they didn’t want us to go through the same financial hardships they did. We grew up believing that finding security and stability was the path to happiness.

But of course, life didn’t pan out the way I had hoped. For those keeping track, I’m about one for three on the Asian American immigrant dream scoreboard: I’ve got a solid career, but I’m not married with kids nor do I own any property. About half of my friends are married with their own homes and some even have kids already. My social media feeds went from being filled with episodes of debauchery to minute-by-minute updates on child-rearing. As for me, I’m about to enter my 30th year in a couple of months, and I’m definitely not getting married anytime soon (nor do I have any intention of doing so). Just like that, my dreams changed because I had to rethink a happiness that was my own and not one tied to the Asian American immigrant dream.

Thankfully, my mother no longer asks about making her a grandmother anytime soon. (She used to forget that a partner is necessary before I go into the baby-making phase.) Instead, she asks when I’m going to buy a house. She’s slowly accepting the fact that I’ll be a career-minded serial dater for a while, so she’s using buying property as her new marker for security and stability.

Dreams may change, but nagging Asian moms never will.

This story was originally published in our Summer 2014 issue. Get your copy here. 

WHERE IN THE WORLD: Top 5 Must-Go Destinations

We spoke to five tastemakers about their most favorite place in the world to spend their vacation. Now, we’ve put all the responses together just in time for your summer vacation. Still trying to decide where to spend the next couple of months? Need some tips about where to stay, what to eat and what to do? Check out our list of Top 5 Must-Go Destinations.

 

with 1
1) Bagan, Burma

Chosen by bridal gown fashion designer, Trish Lee. Read the full story here.


with 2
2) Tokyo, Japan

Chosen by actress Josie Ho. Read the full story here. 

with 3
3) Florence, Italy

Chosen by online travel magazine writer, Geena “Super G” Dabadghav. Read the full story here.

with 4
4) Algonquin Park, Canada 

Chosen by So Young bags and accessories’ Catherine Choi. Read the full story here.

with 55) Ko Lanta, Thailand
Chosen by Audrey’s editor-in-chief. Read the full story here. 

 

 

This story was originally published in our Summer 2014 issue. Get your copy here.

Understanding the Asian Glow: FRIEND OR FOE?

 

Story by Teena Apeles.

Seeing red every happy hour? Or should we say, does everybody else see that unseemly crimson creep up on your face with that first sip? It’s not just you. About a third of East Asians, and even some Southeast Asians, suffer from the uncomfortable flushing that accompanies drinking. But beyond aesthetics, the Asian glow, which is caused by a genetic condition, comes with some serious consequences. Contributing writer Teena Apeles parses out fact from fiction.

 


WHEN YOU HEAR the phrase “Asian glow,” what comes to mind? The word “glow” to me mostly has positive connotations, like “pregnancy glow,” referring to an expectant mother’s complexion and overall appearance as being radiant. Or there’s “glow” as in bright, shining.

While I’d like to think of the Asian glow, also called the “Asian flush,” as something complimentary or something one would like to achieve, for anyone who experiences this flushing of the face after drinking alcohol — or knows someone who does — it’s anything but. Me with a bright red face … not something cute nor radiant and, depending on how much alcohol I consume, neither is the feeling when I’m experiencing it: I turn dark red, I feel feverish and dizzy, my whole body throbs and I get incredibly self-conscious of my appearance because it can look alarming. If you’re in the same alcohol-induced, red-face drinker camp as I am, you know this all too well and probably just brush it off as an annoyance — or find ways to prevent it, but more on that later.

Twenty-three-year-old Faith, who works as a beauty writer, recalls the first time she got the Asian glow during college, “when I had a shot of vodka at a fraternity house,” though it didn’t seem to alarm anyone, including herself. “No one really said anything, because it seemed like common knowledge that Asians got red when they had alcohol,” says the Chinese American. “I remember seeing my dad get red when he drank beer, so I guess I wasn’t too surprised. I was more annoyed about the side effects: My heart was pounding, and I got a huge headache.”

Jeannie, a Korean American in her early 30s, remembers experiencing the Asian glow when she first drank. “Actually, I maybe suspected it even before, because my dad had it, and I’d seen other older Korean people have it,” she says. “I’m not sure if I know the science — I heard that it’s because we miss an enzyme to process alcohol, but other people describe it more simplistically as an allergy.” Jeannie goes on to echo Faith’s and my complaints about the physical effects that follow: “You don’t really enjoy drinking once it starts giving you a pounding headache.”

At last year’s Audrey anniversary gala, where cocktails and high-end whiskey abounded, Chinese American TV personality and journalist Lisa Ling opened the event by joking that she liked attending events like this — with a predominantly Asian audience — because she knew she wouldn’t be the only who would be red by the end of the night. And, yes, while that line was met with a lot of laughter, studies suggest this condition should not be taken lightly by any means, especially if you drink often. But first, let’s get down to what causes it.

 


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THE SCIENCE BEHIND THE FLUSH
The symptoms that accompany the facial flushing, which Jeannie and Faith described, are what a significant percentage of East Asians (Chinese, Japanese or Korean) experience, due to a genetic condition that prevents their bodies from breaking down the alcohol. And Jeannie is correct that a particular enzyme is the culprit.

“Between 30 to 40 percent of East Asians have a genetic variation in an enzyme called aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2),” explains Dr. Jessica Wu, a Los Angeles dermatologist and assistant clinical professor of dermatology at the USC School of Medicine. “This enzyme converts alcohol to another compound called acetaldehyde.” People who have a fully active ALDH2 enzyme can break down the acetaldehyde, but in ALDH2-deficient individuals, “this compound accumulates in the body and releases histamine. The combination of acetaldehyde and histamine produces the characteristic symptoms of alcohol intolerance: redness, flushing, shortness of breath, headaches, nausea and heart palpitations.”

The alcohol-induced symptoms in individuals can vary from mild to extreme, depending on whether a person inherited one or two of these variant genes. In the latter case, facial flushing can be quite severe, resulting in an almost purple flush and other symptoms. That sure takes the fun out of drinking, right? But people with this genetic variant condition still drink despite these symptoms. “My patients who are young women are especially embarrassed by this because drinking is often a part of socializing, dating and business entertaining,” says Wu.

About 92 percent of the world’s population can enjoy drinking just fine without turning red. Lucky them. But for ALDH2-deficient individuals, heavy drinking can have harsher consequences beyond facial flushing over time.

 

THE LINK BETWEEN THE ASIAN GLOW AND CANCER
Dr. Philip J. Brooks of the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism was doing research on the general topic of alcohol and cancer when, in 2007, he became acquainted with Dr. Akira Yokoyama and his “tremendous work” on the relationship between ALDH2-deficiency and esophageal cancer in the Japanese population. The two met at the International Agency for Research on Cancer. “I was struck by how strong the data was and how relatively too few people were aware of it, compared to some of the other effects of alcohol,” says Brooks.

Brooks and Yokoyama went on to write the article “The Alcohol Flushing Response: An Unrecognized Risk Factor for Esophageal Cancer from Alcohol Consumption,” published in PLOS Medicine on March 29, 2009, with colleagues Mary-Anne Enoch, David Goldman and Ting-Kai Li. If you missed out on this research hitting the news, despite it being featured in every major news outlet during that time, so did I, which is why it’s so important that you share it. Here’s your chance to separate the fact from fiction and, perhaps, spare loved ones in your life who drink a lot of headaches … or much worse.

Brooks and Yokoyama’s article states, “ALDH2-deficient individuals are at much higher risk of esophageal cancer (specifically squamous cell car- cinoma) from alcohol consumption than individuals with fully active ALDH2.” And this particular alcohol-related esophageal cancer is quite deadly: The five-year survival rate in the United States is only 15.6 percent and 31.6 percent in Japan. But what you should take from this, Brooks emphasizes, “is this cancer is preventable.”

And while it would seem that if you just have one copy of this variant gene your risk of developing esophageal cancer would be lower than if you have two copies, that’s not the case. “People who have two copies get so sick when they drink that they basically don’t drink,” he says. “Ironically, they are protected from being alcoholics, and they are actually at a lower risk of getting esophageal cancer because they just don’t drink. So it’s kind of a complicated genotype.”

 


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THE CURE FOR THE ASIAN GLOW
Let’s get one thing straight: There is no cure per se for alcohol-induced flushing if you are ALDH2 deficient, despite articles you see online. Sure, people have posted that there are ways to mask or minimize the onset of the flushing — a cursory search will even bring up some herbal remedy to take 21 days before having a drink to remove all symptoms. And some people say they have developed a higher tolerance to alcohol and experience less flushing over time, but these things are not in themselves a cure for the root of what causes it: your genetic condition.

For instance, in a 1988 article titled “Antihistamine Blockade of Alcohol-induced Flushing in Orientals” — yes, it used that term — published in the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, the authors shared results of an alcohol study conducted on Asians. Half of the subjects received 50 milligrams of diphenhydramine and 300 milligrams of cimetidine before receiving low doses of alcohol; the other half, placebo tablets. The abstract states: “The antihistamine group showed a significant reduction in the skin flush. The antihistamine also neutralized the systolic hypotension induced by the administration of alcohol.”

Now does this mean you should start popping antihistamines before you drink so you don’t turn red? Most definitely not. According to the U.S. National Library of Medicine and National Institutes of Health, you should not drink alcohol when you are taking antihistamines, period.

Other remedies for the Asian glow you’ll see online or learn from Asian friends — as I have — are antacids, which contain histamine blockers that people have reported minimize flushing. “I actually can’t remember how I first heard about how to avoid it. I think it must have been from a friend or classmate, who recommended Pepcid AC,” says Faith. “I did some Googling and decided to try it out for myself and found that it worked, but that Zantac (which does the same thing but has a different active ingredient) worked better for me.” She takes one Zantac 45 minutes before she takes her first sip of alcohol to avoid the Asian flush and other symptoms.

While I haven’t tried antacids or antihistamines before drinking (the latter makes me feel a little loopy as it is), I must admit I’m curious to see what would happen. For once, can I not be the one bright red, unhealthy-looking face in group pictures?

Even if they do work, this is not a cure for my condition. Using anything to mask the facial flushing and continue drinking, Brooks feels, is particularly dangerous because it isn’t reducing the risk of esophageal cancer. “And to the extent it makes you think you can keep drinking more,” he adds, “it’s actually worse.”

The takeaway? If you’re an ALDH2-deficient individual, it is in your genetic makeup and can’t be changed. Therefore, there is only one sure way to avoid alcohol-induced flushing (and you know the answer): Don’t drink.

 

THE RED FLAG THAT SAVES LIVES

If something doesn’t make you feel good, consider it your body’s way of protecting you. It’s saying whatever you’re doing is simply not good for you. So here’s the silver lining on that Asian glow and its unpleasant related symptoms: These adverse reactions you experience when drinking alcohol make you less likely to abuse alcohol (this has been shown in research with groups of East Asians who have the condition) and, in turn, suffer from alcoholism and all the health risks associated with it, including esophageal cancer.

Of course, it’s difficult in social situations not to drink while the rest of the world seems to be partaking in what most consider a pleasurable pastime. But university students with this ALDH2 deficiency especially (yes, we’re talking to you, young women) should take note of the alcohol-related risks that come with heavy drinking over time.

Heavy drinking is simply bad for your health as it is. “Readers should be aware that the American Heart Association warns that drinking more than a glass of wine a day (for women) is associated with a higher risk of obesity, diabetes and heart disease,” says Wu. And if you do have alcohol intolerance, she suggests that you “drink sparingly and choose your drinking occasions wisely.” And if you care about your skin, here’s another reason to take her advice: “Repeated episodes of flushing can enlarge the facial veins, leading to permanent redness and/or ‘spider’ veins on the face.”

I’m well beyond university age, but the Asian glow still bothers me. I do wish I could happily enjoy a cocktail or beer with my friends or even my husband without consequence. But I’ll admit the condition does save me money most of the time — drinks are expensive in Los Angeles! (Except, of course, when I go out with friends and we split the bill evenly and I’m the one person who gets stuck paying extra money for their expensive glasses of wine. Goodness, if I can have that extra cash back from all those nights. …)

So what’s your verdict now that you know what causes your uncomfortable alcohol-induced flushing? Are you going to treat the Asian glow as a friend or a foe? I vote friend, because a good friend is someone who looks out for you. And to that I will toast — and wear my facial flush that follows proudly.

This story was originally published in our Summer 2014 issue. Get your copy here