Haerfest Will Make You Fall In Love With Backpacks All Over Again

 

Backpacks have a long history stemming from both casual to military use, but as with most accessories, there is always some sort of fashion-focused, mainstream revival. Backpacks generally have most of us reminisce about our early school days or university years of carrying heavy loads of textbooks and papers, but fashion week produced newly inspired designs that work more for style statements rather than practicality. Ultimately, I prefer to find something advantageous to both function and aesthetic, so I revisited the brand Haerfest founded by New Yorkers, Daniel and Tim Joo.

A few years back, I was sitting in a friend’s apartment being introduced to his cousins who, at the time, were in the beginning phases of developing a line of accessories. They graciously shared a little of what they were doing while running back and forth between laptops, working on sketches and what was likely early product development. At the time I wasn’t writing for fashion, but instead science and research so I didn’t think anything about it other than it was amazing to see entrepreneurial spirits at their best. My favorite part of fashion is the beginning, which always starts as a simple idea coated with drive and hope, much like the fields of scientific research. Over the years these two men have produced a luxurious and sleek brand of backpacks, briefcases and small leather goods that outshine the overly sporty styles being carried around.

 

Their bags are perfect for any environment, and for those women who are enamored with menswear inspirations; carrying around any of their products would even grab the attention of those who prefer more classic, feminine accessories. Created in neutral tones, along with an artful balance of leather and textiles, the most appreciative design feature is their signature single strap construction with a ring and stud system. This provides stability and strength for any degree of handling a wearer may impose on the bag. The use of cowhide leather only adds to the durability, making any of their goods a worthy investment. For those of us who find functionality essential, interior pockets and sleeves offer extra storage and easy access for our personal belongings.

For me, it is wonderful to see the current growth and success of Haerfest since the time I first learned about the brand. My only hope is that their accomplishments and popularity continue to flourish in the fashion industry.

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Signature Single Strap Design.

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The F20 Briefcase — Available at Haerfest.us in green, black, red and blue for $425.

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The G13 Shell Backpack — Available at Haerfest.us in blue and black for $375.

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The G24 Shopper — Available at Haerfest.us in blue and black for $275.

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The Capsule Backpack — Available at Haerfest.us in blue, black, red and green for $395.

 

–STORY BY MIN A. LEE
All images courtesy of Haerfest.us

 

 

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ANTI-AGING YOGA: Fight Aging Without A Single Cream, Needle or Laser

 

One of my yoga mentors once said in class during a shoulder stand, “Do this every day for 30 minutes, and you will see that this is better than even the most expensive anti-aging cream out there. Truly.”

Mind you, this teacher looked half his age. Since this admonition, I’ve used the shoulder stand to end every one of my own classes. The shoulder stand increases your blood circulation to the face, which is a great way to prevent premature aging and encourage a youthful glow. Do the following three poses on a daily basis, along with your skin care regime, and you are on your way to a beautifully youthful and healthy look.

 


 

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Yoga Pose #1: Standing Forward Fold
Stand up straight with open shoulders, legs together, big toes touching. Inhale and stretch the hands up to the sky, gazing up. Exhale and fold over your legs, hands by the sides of your feet or arms behind the calves. Think about lifting the tailbone up higher as you drop the crown of the head lower. Stay for five to eight breaths.

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Yoga Pose #2: Seated Forward Fold
Sit with legs out in front of you, big toes touching. To ensure that your hip bones are rooted down evenly and firmly, lift up your right hip, shift the right butt cheek to the side, and repeat on the other side. (Yes, literally move your cheeks.) Inhale and stretch the arms up to the sky. Aim for a tall lengthy spine. Then exhale and, keeping the spine lengthened, lower down to touch the toes. It is OK to bend your knees as long as you are keeping the spine long and the head is completely dropped towards the knees. Breathe for five to eight breaths.

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Yoga Pose #3: Shoulder Stand
Lay on your back. With the strength of your core and with ener- getic legs, lift the legs up to the sky and place your hands on the lower back. Press the palms to push the back up straight. Lift the kneecaps up to keep your legs energized and straight up, feet flexed. Bear your weight on your shoulders, relaxing the neck and breathing. Stay for five to eight breaths. Eventually, work up to a 30-minute shoulder stand.

 

 

 

Sunina Young (sunina.com) is a yoga and SLT pilates instructor in New York City.
Photos courtesy of Ron Gejon.
This story was originally published in our Fall 2014 issue. Get your copy here

 

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Fashion Trend Alert: Front Slit Skirts

 

Split skirts have been around for years, but recently, we’ve seen them make some major appearances in both street wear and on the red carpet. Split skirt comes in different lengths and slits, but what makes the front slit split outstanding is that it has a classiness to it, even with the same amount of thigh-baring.

It seems that the front split skirt trend has caught the attention of some of our most favorite Asian bloggers and can be seen in Asian street wear. The trend has even been picked up by Asian flight attendants (see below) looking to spice up their bland uniforms.

Go ahead and take a few minutes to look at different styles of front slit skirts and see how you can make the look truly yours:

 


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Photo courtesy of http://lookbook.nu/look/5829715-Alexander-Wang-Jamie-Chastity-Chain-Tote-Bag

1. Yes, we all thought this was a dress, but they are actually two separate pieces. A monotone top and bottom, both with front gaps, recreates the original pieces to look like an entirely different outfit with edginess.

 


 

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Photo courtesy of http://www.hercanberra.com.

2. Slits don’t need to be too deep. Just a good amount of bottom skin revealing with a cozy sweater is the perfect go-to outfit this fall.

 


 

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Photo courtesy of http://instagram.com/p/s-jZtmHj35/?modal=true

3. Make use of your denim shirt with a distressed split skirt to boast the ultimate modern woman look. You can easily create your own distressed pair without spending a lot of cash on buying one. Click here for the DIY tutorial.

 


 


 

Photo courtesy of http://www.fashionwinsum.com

Photo courtesy of http://www.fashionwinsum.com

4. The beautifully layered line on this skirt, which opens up elegantly on the middle, is the answer to your date-night outfit. It’s the perfect mix of classy and sexy.

 


 

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Photo courtesy of http://www.ausbt.com.au/photos-china-eastern-s-new-christian-lacroix-uniform-revealed

5. Flight attendants taking their fashion onto another level with front slits. I know which airline I’m now taking when traveling to China.

 


 

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Photo courtesy of http://www.lyst.com/clothing/junya-watanabe-splitfront-distressed-denim-skirt-blue/

6. One slit is not enough. This long denim skirt layered with a white dress is no doubt the winner for the day.

 

 

 –STORY BY MICHELLE KIM
Cover photo courtesy of http://tiaalesewong.com/category/outfits/

 

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Get To Know Korean Model Jang Yoon-Ju

 

Korean model Jang Yoon-Ju, known for her god gifted body and unique face, is not only one skilled and confident model, she’s also been active within the media. Jang has taken part in movies, music albums and videos and even tried her hands in books. Though she was already a well-known model, she regained the spotlight earlier this year when she was virtually married to Noh Hong-Chul on a Korean television entertainment program, Infinite Challenge.

Though Jang’s body is the subject of admiration today, it used to be a disgrace to her during her childhood. As a kid, Jang was teased by her peers for her height and skinny body, but her middle school math teacher, who saw Jang’s potential in the modeling industry, told Jang that her long legs and beautiful Asian facial features will make her an outstanding candidate as a model. Since then, her classmates started calling her a “model.”

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Photo courtesy of http://blog.naver.com/9348474/60170274147

In 1997, Jang made her debut in the Seoul Fashion Artists Association (SFAA) collection and made her first appearance on the runway. At that time, the fashion industry was alternating into a new paradigm called “orientalism” and shifted its focus more towards Asian models. Of course, all eyes were on Jang.

Since then, Jang advanced her modeling career in many ways. She also experienced countless failures along the way, but the process enabled her to understand her identity and grow as a model.

Today, Jang is the host for Korea’s Next Top Model as well as the DJ for her own radio program, Rooftop Radio. Clearly, she’s not the average model and there’s no single way to define her.

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jang 5 jang 6

 

 

–STORY BY MICHELLE KIM

Top 3 Lipsticks Made Famous by K-Dramas

 

Korean actress Jun Ji Hyun’s lipstick color made a huge hit during the Korean drama My Love From Another Star. But the Korean wave didn’t simply end there. Other lip trends, including the most recent ombre lips, were commonly spotted on K-Pop Stars and K-Drama actresses, which later brought wide interest even within American media.

There are countless make up trends that trace back to K-Dramas, but today, we’re focusing on three of the latest and most popular Korean dramas as well as the actresses’ iconic lipstick colors that you should get your hands on.

 


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1. Kong Hyo-Jin from It’s Okay, That’s Love

Whatever Kong Hyo-Jin brings to the TV screen is the next trend. Known for her laid-back yet unique sense of style, Kong has earned reputation as one of the most stylish celebrities in Korea. Of course, we can’t miss the lipstick she wears in the K-drama It’s Okay, That’s Love.

For those who love orange hues like Kong should try the Armani Lip Maestro in 300 to get that extra vivid and sweet look.

 

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2. Lee Yoo-Ri from Jang Bo-Ri Is Here!

Though Lee Yoo-Ri acts as the villain in the drama Jang Bo-Ri Is Here!, you can’t help but be a fan of her makeup on set. Most often talked about is Lee’s bold lip color in the drama, which is more powerful and rich than any red lipstick you might have ever seen.

The ‘limited-edition’ Seatree-Art Matt Kiss Lipstick: 03 Gorgeous Red is the answer to your curiosity and has quite the power of bringing out a soft, velvety richness appearance on the lips.

 


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3. Han Yeo-Reum from Discovery of Romance

The makeup worn by Han Yeo-Reun from Discovery of Romance is known for bringing back the man that broke your heart. What makes her makeup look different from other actresses is that she looks extremely natural. Of course, the lipstick takes a huge role in creating that look.

The Dior Rouge Baume #688 Diorette is the lipstick that makes Han’s skin look even brighter and softer than before. A touch of the lipstick will make your lips appear as if you put tinted lip balm, and two to three touches will bring out the actual rich color.

 

–STORY BY MICHELLE KIM

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Ki Hong Lee’s Debut Film “The Maze Runner” Premieres Today

 

On a cool summer afternoon, Ki Hong Lee casually types on a laptop at a small coffee shop in the heart of Koreatown. Sipping tea out of a plastic to-go cup, the rising star looks relaxed as he greets me with an easy smile, ready for one of many interviews surely to come for the young actor.

Lee is standing on the edge of major success. On September 19, the Korean American actor will appear on big screens across America in the 20th Century Fox film The Maze Runner, based on the bestselling young adult sci-fi trilogy by James Dashner, alongside fellow actors Dylan O’Brien, Will Poulter, Kaya Scodelario, Thomas Brodie-Sangster and Patricia Clarkson.

Lee stars as Minho, one of the many boys trapped in an area known as the Glade, which is surrounded by a large maze. The boys send “Runners” into the maze to find an escape from the Glade. However, the puzzle isn’t the only obstacle they face; “Grievers,” large creatures with multiple mechanical arms, stand in their way. Minho is the Keeper of the Runners and is brave, smart and levelheaded. When another boy, Thomas, is sent to the Glade, Minho befriends him and together, they set off on a thrilling, action-packed adventure.

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For Lee, landing the role of Minho was a dream come true. But getting the part was like navigating through a different kind of labyrinth.

“I went to read for the casting director several times,” he says. “We got close to booking, but it didn’t happen. Then we sent a final tape to the producers around Christmastime [in 2012]. I was literally sitting at home waiting by the phone. … But there was no answer. So when 2013 came, January and February goes by and still nothing.”

Then Lee got a call from casting director Denise Chamian. She told him to buy the book and start reading it. Lee was “pumped and excited.” From there, Chamian sent Lee on a series of seven or eight more auditions.

“It was tough,” he says. “But then I got the call from my agent that I got it. Throughout the whole process, Denise and [director] Wes Ball pushed hard for me; they had my back. I can’t talk about this movie without thanking them.”

 

***

Born in Seoul, Lee left the peninsula and moved to Auckland, New Zealand, when he was 6 years old. Two years later, Lee’s family made their way to the United States. They ended up running Tofu Village, a Korean restaurant in Los Angeles’ Little Tokyo.

While attending school and waiting tables for his parents at the small eatery, Lee also went to church. During a retreat, Lee got roped into acting in a skit for his congregation.

“I loved it,” he remembers. “But I never took a theater class in high school. I don’t know why; I just focused on school, and I was more into sports, [like] basketball and tennis.”

While Lee did act here and there for his church, he didn’t seriously think about it until college. Lee majored in psychology at the University of California, Berkeley, but not wanting to go to graduate school, he turned to acting instead. He took an acting class and decided to give it a try for one year.

“That was so naive of me,” he says. “I soon realized I had a lot to learn, and I still do. Acting is the same as any other profession; you have to put your work in.”

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With the support of his parents, Lee worked hard. He studied Korean and American actors. He learned that he had to do his job well and not expect things to just magically happen. He knew he had to put himself out there and go on multiple auditions.

Lee also had to surmount his ethnicity and pursue roles that weren’t just the stereotypical Asian character. He believed that if he could hone his craft well enough, he would stand out among his peers and people wouldn’t see the color of his skin, but rather the quality of his acting. Lee pushed himself and, despite the initial rejections, stayed the course.

His tenacity paid off. In 2010 he began acting in small parts. In 2011, Lee landed a major role on the short-lived ABC series The Nine Lives of Chloe King. “I was like a kid in a candy store,” says Lee. “I got to go to work every day on a television set and live my dream. … I learned so much.” Lee’s next project is a pilot for an ABC sci-fi drama, The Whispers, set to debut next year.

But for now, expect Lee to be swept up in the whirlwind that is the press tour for The Maze Runner. And if things go well, expect a sequel, The Scorch Trials (director Wes Ball just announced that they may start shooting in the fall), in which Minho also prominently features. As for Lee, his expectations are more modest: “I’m taking everything day by day, and I’m trying to improve as an actor with each project I do. Being given a chance to do what I love is the best job I can have.”

 

– STORY BY CAROL PARK
This story was originally published in our Fall 2014 issue. Get your copy here

 

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Get to Know Singer-Songwriter Malea McGuinness

 

HERITAGE: Korean, Irish, Scotch

BORN: Killeen, Texas; raised in Long Island, N.Y., and currently based in Los Angeles

CLAIM TO FAME: The classically trained musician, who got her start on Broadway and once toured with Kenny Loggins, has reinvented herself once again with a recent Top 20 hit on Billboard’s Dance Chart for her song “Give (Promise Land Remix).” Her 2013 hit “Rainbow Girl (Papercha$er Remix)” has already reached more than 50 million plays, and she is currently in the studio with Dutch songwriter-producer Tearce “Kizzo” Keaz.

 


My go-to karaoke song: I’ve only done karaoke once, in Koreatown, and I sang “Sweet Child of Mine” very badly.

Last time I cried: Watching The Normal Heart on HBO, about the start of the AIDS epidemic.

What always makes me laugh: My dogs and my baby girl.

My go-to comfort food: Pizza.

Last thing I ate: Cuban food from Versailles: plantains, beans and rice with this amazing garlic sauce.

Currently on repeat: Kiesza’s “Hideaway.”

A guilty pleasure I don’t feel guilty about: Crashing out in front of the TV at the end of the day.

Current favorite place: Cross Creek in Malibu.

Favorite drink: Vodka mojito, extra sweet.

Pet peeve: Drivers with the “Only I exist” syndrome.

Habit I need to break: Diet Coke.

Hidden talent: Mind control.

Talent I’d like to have: Bellydancing.

Word I most overuse: “Like.”

Most treasured possession: They’re not possessions, but I would say my two dogs, Tc and Jonah.

Favorite hashtag: #too#many#hashtags. I tweet to stay in touch with fans, but I really hate talking about myself all the time.

Motto: I would/wouldn’t like that person in my foxhole.

What’s cool about being Asian: Asian don’t crack.

My job in another life: Astrologer … or working with animals.
 
 
This story was originally published in our Fall 2014 issue. Get your copy here

 

 

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Top 7 New York Fashion Week Style Favorites

 

Catwalk galleries and runway shows are important when it comes to fashion weeks, but the real highlight may be the different and unique styles people bring out.

Although the New York Fashion Week came to a close last week, we have to show you these eye-catching looks from some of our favorite editors, bloggers, models and celebrities.

 


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Photo courtesy of www.fashionblender.com.au

1.Susanna Lau (a.k.a. Susie Bubble)
The queen of mix-matching prints showed a more subtle look during the NYFW with her distressed denim that had a piece of red bandana fabric sewed in. Her final touch was red glitter ballet flats that made the casual look not too basic.

 

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Photo courtesy of www.fustany.com

2. Eva Chen
Eva Chen was on point, sporting her smiley face hard-shell clutch that totally stood out on her black and white outfit.

 

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Photo courtesy of www.Koreanmodel.tumblr.com

3. Irene Kim
There’s never too much ruffle when it comes to NYFW.

 

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Photo courtesy of www.nypost.com

4. Margaret Zhang
Margaret was all bundled up for fall and winter with layers and a furry bag held tightly on her arms.

 

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Photo courtesy of www.vogue.com

5. Lily Kwong
Summer ain’t over till Lily says it. Her colorfully printed mid-split, midi skirt paired with her everyday denim jacket is everything.

 

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Photo courtesy of www.popsugar.com.au

6. Shay Mitchell
Shay surely did this year’s NYFW black and white best when she made an appearance at the BCBGMaxaria show with her white dress and a long black vest.

 

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Photo courtesy of www.popsugar.com.au


7. Jamie Chung
Jamie stood out at the BCBGMaxaria show with her pretty little black skirt and her western-inspired BCBG Runway Mira Cape.

 

 

Which one is your favorite look?

 

–STORY BY MICHELLE KIM


Son Sings His Heart Out For Deaf Parents Who Both Have Cancer

When asked by the judges of Superstar K6 for his reason behind auditioning, contestant Kim Jung Hoon could hardly hold back tears as he revealed a heartbreaking story about his family.

“Both of my parents are deaf,” Kim said in his pre-audition interview. He added that both of his parents lost their hearing during early childhood and currently have cancer: his mother suffering from thyroid cancer and his father from colorectal cancer.

“It felt like the world was falling apart,” he said.

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Despite their disabilities, Kim’s parents came to the audition to show full support for their son.

“When we see our son, even though we can’t hear him sing, we believe that he can succeed,” Kim’s father said through sign language. His wife agreed, saying that they believe in their son whether he sings well or poorly.

Once Kim took the stage, he proved that he could sing not only beautifully but also with powerful emotion. His rendition of Lee Sun-hee’s “Fate” moved some of the judges to tears.

Watch his performance below:

–Story by Reera Yoo

This story was originally published on iamkoream.com.

Find Out Why We Love Kimiko Glenn, The “Orange is the New Black” Actress Behind Brook Soso

 

Orange Is the New Black, Netflix’s trailblazing prison dramedy, which just released its second season, highlights a multiethnic cast, as well a variety of gender and sexual identities. However, despite all of the diversity in season one, the only Asian inmate was Chang (played by Lori Tan Chinn), a hilarious but rarely seen older woman with a thick accent. So when Brook Soso, played by biracial Japanese American actress Kimiko Glenn, dressed in prison orange, walked wide-eyed into Litchfield Prison, she turned heads on and off screen. Because this was one of the rare occurrences where a character in a mainstream show had their Asian identity explored in a non-stereotypical way.

Glenn, an Arizona native, began doing theater when she was 10 years old. Halfway through her first year at the Boston Conservatory, she was cast in the first national tour of Spring Awakening and subsequently moved to New York to continue to pursue theater, including originating a role in Julianne Moore’s Freckleface Strawberry.

Orange Is the New Black (OITNB) creator Jenji Kohan had caught Glenn’s performance in the musical adaptation of Love’s Labour’s Lost in Shakespeare in the Park and asked Glenn to perform a Meredith Brooks sing-along as one of her contributions to her first season on the show. “Singing is one of my stronger suits, so I think maybe that’s why it was written in,” says Glenn. “It’s nice that I got to sing. But I didn’t sing in my real-person- Kimiko voice; it was in my Brook voice.”

Although a self-described TV newcomer, Glenn holds her own with veterans like Kate Mulgrew and Taylor Schilling. With perfect comic timing, Glenn performs some of the funniest lines of the season: “You seem so calm. Are you a murderer?” she inquires with earnest, child-like sincerity. Glenn describes Brook as “a chatty social activist who wants to be loved and understood.” Indeed, her character, nicknamed “babbling Brook,” is so misunderstood and grating, that you don’t know whether you want to hug her or throttle her. Nonetheless, Glenn defends Brook, saying, “She makes points in ways that annoy people, but she’s often right. The conditions in the prison are terrible, and Brook brings that to light.” And it cannot be denied that, despite Brook’s seemingly flighty nature, she stands behind her convictions, be it a hunger strike or a refusal to shower, much to her fellow inmates’ chagrin.

No one is more conflicted about Brook than the show’s lead, Piper Chapman. Initially nurturing to Brook, Piper later turns on her. “Sometimes when you see yourself in someone, who you used to be, you reject it,” theorizes Glenn. “I think that’s part of what’s going on. Also, she’s irritated by Brook because the moment she gives me a little warmth, I latch onto her and she pushes me away.”

Glenn has a lot of fondness for Brook and begrudgingly admits that she relates to her character’s neo-hippie lifestyle. Glenn once went on a silent Vipassana meditation retreat and regularly oil pulls in the morning. But unlike Brook, Glenn says she is “not nearly as aggressively vocal. I’m pretty shy at heart. Not to say that I can’t be talkative, but I err on the side of caution before speaking my mind.”

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Glenn describes the process of shooting for TV as “wildly different” from theater. “You do a scene for two hours and then you’re done with that scene. You can be on a run of a play for years and do that scene over and over. It was very strange to figure out how to memorize this, stay open, try new things, all in a few takes. It was a lot to adjust to.” But she did like one thing: “You can whisper.”

It was in the midst of binge-watching OITNB that Glenn, who is friends with Uzo Aduba (Crazy Eyes), received a casting notice. “I thought I was seeing things,” she laughs. “It was nine pages of sides, and I thought, ‘Oh god, I have to do really well, because it’s such a good show.’” The next day she auditioned, the following day she booked it, and the day after, she was on set at 6 a.m. to shoot her first sex scene ever with Natasha Lyonne.

Although comfortable with her body and the nudity required for the role, Glenn was concerned. Lyonne gave her pointers. “She told me it was technical and not sexual at all,” says Glenn. “At the end of the day, people want you to feel comfortable, do well and get out of there. She gave me some good advice.” Glenn also appreciated that “the producer, a woman, was very understanding and made it clear they wouldn’t make me do anything I’m not comfortable with. We agreed upon a mapped out scene and decided what it would be. It wasn’t as daunting or crazy as you might think.”

When she told her parents she was on the critically acclaimed and occasionally graphic show, her mother wrote on Facebook, “Kimi is doing this show. Excited but apprehensive, haha.” Glenn explains that her parents were “aware that it is a racy show. Either way, they are really proud of me.” And they have a lot to be proud of. Brook is also in season three, slated for release next summer, of the successful show, which to date has received 12 Primetime Emmy Award nominations and a Satellite Award for Best Cast in a Television Series.

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The show’s unique blend of dark humor, dramatic heft, flashback structure and vivid characters sets it apart from any other show out there. Glenn remarks that the casting process for her role was ethnically unspecified. “The show’s creative team knew Brook’s characteristics, but in terms of looks, they were open. A lot of people auditioned who were all different colors, shapes and sizes, and then they landed on me.” Once Glenn was cast, Brook’s hapa identity was written into the script.

All too often, when Asians are represented in popular culture, they speak in broken English or are defined by common tropes such as geisha, ninja, opium dealer, manicurist and so on. On the other side of the spectrum, when we do see a hapa on film or TV, the actor often passes for white or their ethnic identity is never discussed. However, confusion over Brook’s Eurasian appearance is addressed in one of her first scenes. Brook is given a tribal welcome toothbrush by the overtly racist Morello, who usually reserves kindness for white inmates. “I don’t normally bend the rules like this, but you don’t look full Asian,” she says, looking Brook over.

OITNB’s openness to casting is refreshing to Glenn, who has encountered her share of difficulties and discrimination in her many years auditioning. “There were times where I was told I wasn’t cast because they wanted a blond, to put it nicely,” she says. “It was disheartening as a kid to grow up knowing that. In the real world, there is room to cast more openly, but it’s still a big issue and something that I deal with on a daily basis. This show is a great example of colorblind casting. They cast who’s best for the part. The women on the show are not the kind of people you normally see in Hollywood. I think OITNB is opening people’s minds about what they want to see.”

Catch Kimiko Glenn in season two of Orange Is the New Black on Netflix.com.

 

–Story by Susan Soon He Stanton
This story was originally published in our Fall 2014 issue. Get your copy here. 

PHOTOS BY EMILY SOTO; HAIR BY LAURA SHELLEY FOR EXCLUSIVE ARTISTS; MAKEUP BY JESSI BUTTERFIELD FOR EXCLUSIVE ARTISTS.