Flashback Friday | Ten Taiwanese Leading Ladies You Should Know

Ang Lee has done more than anyone to bring attention to the Taiwanese film industry, shooting much of his 3D fantasy film Life of Pi in Taipei and Taichung — and always making sure to thank Taiwan in those Oscar speeches, even if his film is about gay cowboys in Wyoming. But Taiwan’s local films have had a recent commercial resurgence as well, catapulted by 2008′s super hit Cape No. 7. More recently, successful films include You Are The Apple of My Eye, Monga, and Seediq Bale, in addition to Taiwan/China co-productions like the ensemble romantic comedy Love. At the same time, Taiwanese dramas are as rampant as ever — and all of this brings us a wealth of new Taiwanese leading ladies.

A comprehensive list that spans decades would definitely include Taiwanese talents such as Sylvia Chang, Brigitte Lin, Lu Yi-Ching, Mavis Fan, Barbie Hsu, Rene Liu, Vivian Hsu and more, but instead, we’re going to concentrate on young actresses ruling commercial Taiwanese film and television today.

Michelle Chen 
As the honor student who all five male friends have a crush on in 2011′s hit film You Are The Apple of My Eye, Michelle Chen is the girl next door with that extra sparkle in her smile, should she respect you enough to shine it your way. The film was a commercial hit in Taiwan and the all-time highest grossing Taiwanese film in the Hong Kong box office, and it propelled Chen into stardom, earning her Best Actress nominations for Taipei’s Golden Horse Awards and Asian Film Awards.

Watch:
You Are The Apple of My Eye
Hear Me

 

 

Sandrine Pinna

The half-Taiwanese, half-French actress first started getting noticed in the international festival scene as the muse of director Cheng Yu-Chieh, who cast her in his 2006 film Do Over. In 2009, he wrote Yang Yang – about a Eurasian girl dealing with her identity as a newbie in the entertainment industry — with Pinna in mind. The well-regarded actress has a magnetic quality onscreen, simultaneously child-like and soulful, and she was most recently nominated for Best Actress at the Golden Horse Awards for her work in Touch of the Light, where she plays an aspiring dancer who befriends a blind pianist.

Watch:
Yang Yang
Touch of the Light
Endless Love (TV)

 

 

Shu Qi

Often compared to Angelina Jolie for her sultry lips and smoldering effect onscreen, Shu Qi is most admired for her roles in Hou Hsiao-hsien’s Millenium Mambo and Three Times, for which she won the Golden Horse Award for Best Actress in 2005. She also had a short stint in Hollywood acting, opposite Jason Statham in the original French action film The Transporter (co-directed by Hong Kong action director and choreographer Corey Yuen). In the last five years, she’s earned box office appeal in China with her romantic comedy If You Are The One 1 and 2, but most recently, she was part of the ensemble cast for the 2012 film Love, the Taiwanese version of Love Actually.

Watch:
Millenium Mambo
Three Times
If You Are The One

 

Alice Ke

Alice Ke has a habit of popping up on many successful Taiwanese movies and dramas — from the tarnished hooker with the heart of gold in Monga, to the goal-oriented yet sometimes hapless department store worker in Office Girls, to the smokey-eyed unstable girl who thinks a teddy bear is her boyfriend in Bear It. And somehow Ke makes each wildly different character both likable and multidimensional. Her most recent drama was 2012′s Gung Hay Fat Choy (Wo Men Fa Cai Le).

Watch:
Monga
Bear It
Office Girls (TV)

 

 

Ariel Lin

Ariel Lin first shot to fame in 2005 with It Started With a Kiss. Based on a manga series, Lin plays Xiangqin, the struggling, yet optimistic student who first annoys her crush, the emotionally-challenged genius Zhi Shu, with her haplessness and borderline stalking, but later wins him over out of sheer will power. Seven years later, Lin has grown up and is less “adorable” but more self-reliant in In Time With You, playing the sophisticated but stubborn manager who can’t admit she loves her best friend. The role earned Lin her second Golden Bell Award for Best Leading Actress in a Television Series.

Watch:
It Started With a Kiss (TV)
In Time With You (TV)

 

 

Amber Kuo

Amber Kuo is a Taiwanese Mandopop singer who gained attention as an actress in 2010, with roles in Arvin Chen’s Au Revoir Taipei (where she took home Best New Actress at the Taipei Film Festival) and the TV drama The Year of Happiness and Love (for which she was nominated for Best Leading Actress in a Television Series at the Golden Bell awards). In Doze Niu’s ensemble romantic comedy Love, she gives a memorable performance as a girl betrayed by an indiscretion between her boyfriend and her best friend.

Watch:
Au Revoir Taipei
Love

 

Ivy Chen

2009 was a big year for Ivy Chen, as she played a daughter of the Triad boss in the Golden Bell Award-winning cop series Black & White and gave a memorable turn as the protagonist in Hear Me, a film predominantly told in sign language, for which she won the Best Actress award at the Taipei Film Festival. In 2012, she was in the romantic comedy Love — co-starring actresses Amber Kuo and Shu Qi – playing a young girl who makes a detrimental mistake that might cost her her relationship with her best friend.

Watch:
Hear Me
Love

 

 

Sonia Sui

Sonia Sui’s claim to fame is The Fierce Wife, which was labeled “the most talked about show in Taiwan” in 2011 and was so popular that it was re-aired in Japan later that year and was adapted into a feature film The Fierce Wife: The Final Episode in 2012. Sui plays a young mother whose husband cheats on her with her cousin. Much of the comedy — and tragedy — comes from the ensuing divorce and her attempt to move on, and Sui’s performance has been praised for her balance of strength and fragility.

Watch:
The Fierce Wife

 

 

Rainie Yang

The quintessential Taiwanese idol drama actress, Rainie Yang has been acting and singing since her debut role in 2001′s Meteor Garden. Though prolific, she’s had to work to be taken seriously as an actress, earning respect with her role in 2007′s Spider Lilies, a Zero Chou-directed lesbian drama that won the Teddy Award for Best Film at the Berlin Film Festival. She’s often paired with Mike He, and she recently starred opposite Joseph Chang in Drunken to Love You.

Watch:
Spider Lilies
Hi My Sweetheart (TV)
Devil Beside You (TV)

 

 

Gwei Lun-Mei

Although she got her start in the 2002 film Blue Gate Crossing, Gwen Lun-Mei may be most known for her role opposite Jay Chou in his directorial debut Secret. Gwei earned critical recognition this past year with her performance in Yang Ya-che’s Girlfriend Boyfriend, alongside Joseph Chang and Rhydian Vaughan, and she was the most recent recipient of the Best Actress trophy at the Golden Horse Awards.

Watch:
Secret
Blue Gate Crossing

 

 

Who are your favorite Taiwanese actresses?

Throwback Thursday: The Truth About Asian Women & Alcohol

Story by Janice Jann.

BOOZE CONTROL

Studies indicate that nearly 40 percent of Asian American women drink alcohol and, while that’s less than the 55.2 percent national average, we are at a higher risk for all sorts of medical issues due to our binge drinking. So why do we do it? Editor Janice Jann investigates.

As I lean over the toilet bowl, my hair grazing the rim, I catch a glimpse of my reflection in the water. “Who is this puke-strewn girl, bleary-eyed and green-faced, with her pajamas on backwards, staring back at me?” I think to myself. I mutter, “Never again, never a—,” before nausea sweeps in.

There have been many morning afters like this in the years I have been drinking, each time steeped with more regret than the last. Most of my peers have stories like mine. Many laugh, “Who hasn’t gone through it?”

As normal as binge drinking has become, new studies indicate that Asian American women may want to hold off on that second cocktail the next time they drink for reasons more than just avoiding the toilet bowl the next morning.

The most recent National Survey on Drug Use and Health revealed that the national average of alcohol use for all adults in the U.S. is 55.2 percent, while the national average for Asian Americans is 39.8 percent.

Genetic factors play an important role in why Asian have lower rates of alcohol consumption, according to Tamara Wall, a University of California, San Diego professor of psychology and the director of Psychological Services for the Alcohol and Drug Treatment Program at the Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare System. Studies have shown that 30 to 50 percent of the Asian population have a gene, inactive aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2–2), which causes them to metabolize alcohol differently from people who do not have this gene. This manifests itself physically through headaches, nausea and facial flushing, a.k.a. the “Asian glow.”

Jess, 24, can attest that facial flushing causes her to drink less. “I think if I didn’t have it, I’d be more open to having a casual cocktail with friends and clients,” she says. However, that hasn’t stopped her from binge drinking one recent weekend. Stressed out about her job and living situation for the past couple of months, she “needed a way to just vent and live in the moment.” According to Jess, “I was determined to let myself loose and it was actually my goal to drink until I didn’t remember anything at all.” After four double shots of tequila and two single shots, she did exactly that and stayed in bed sick until 4:30 the next afternoon. “I think it was the stress that had been piling on that pushed me over the edge,” she says.

 

Using alcohol to self-medicate, to relieve stress or to forget problems, has become an increasingly common occurrence among women of the post-Baby Boomer age. As more women enter the workforce, they have to deal with the stressors of the 21st century: increasing challenges in their careers; cultural norms of the workplace, which often includes happy hours and two-martini lunches; motherhood and familial obligations; the list goes on.

Christina, an attorney, agrees. When asked whether work causes her to drink more, she says, “Oh, definitely. That’s a definite issue. I think one reason why people drink so much, especially in my profession, is we’re pretty stressed out. We’re responsible for other people’s issues so when we do have a chance for release, it does get out of hand. Alcohol lets you forget about things for a moment. I knew of one associate who was so stressed, she used to drink every morning before going to work. It was a way to numb herself before she had to deal with the day.”

Though Christina may drink out of stress, she also drinks to celebrate. “After I passed the bar exam, I went out with a friend and I was taking shots galore,” she remembers. “I drank so much tequila that it made me sick to my stomach. I just didn’t give a sh—t that day because I was so happy I passed.”

By the end of the night, Christina “was sitting at my bathroom, wanting to die. You just wanted it to be over with. Every time something like that happens, I tell myself I will never do that again and it happens again.”

Meky had a similar experience on her birthday. “I’m kind of embarrassed to say I got wasted on my 25th birthday and not, like, my 21st or something,” she laughs, thinking back to the celebratory weekend where she downed five Jack Daniel shots in less than an hour, was carried to her car on a friend’s back, and woke up the next morning, her clothes piled by the door.

The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse defines binge drinking for women to be four drinks over a time span of two hours, but once you’ve hit that zone, it’s often difficult to stop at merely four drinks for the night. “It all starts tasting the same after a while,” says Christina. “You become desensitized after a certain amount.”

What’s scarier is that blackouts and vomiting are not the only negative consequences associated with binge drinking. Wall cites an increase in dangerous behaviors such as driving while intoxicated and risky sexual activities.

Binge drinking could also lead to alcoholism, which will require CA drug and alcohol detoxification eventually.

And even though the ALDH2–2 gene have put Asians at a lower risk for developing alcohol problems, it puts them at a higher risk for developing medical problems. Wall lists esophageal cancer, pancreatic cancer, hepatitis and liver problems as common problems for Asian binge drinkers. “The data are pretty clear that if you have the [gene] and you drink heavily, you’re much more likely to developing head and neck cancer,” she adds.

Being an Asian woman, there are even more consequences to frequent binge drinking. In a 2008 New York Magazine article, Susan Foster of the National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University said, “There are huge differences in the way our bodies metabolize alcohol. Women have less body water and more body fat than men. The water dilutes the alcohol in the bloodstream, and will stay in her body longer, even if she is the same size as the guy.” What that means is that women get inebriated with lower levels of consumption at a faster rate. Additionally, alcohol has been known to interfere with fertility and increase the risk of breast cancer. Some researchers believe that a woman who has four drinks a day would increase her nongenetic chance of developing breast cancer by 32 percent.

Freaked out yet? Researching this story has made me think twice about reaching for that soju bottle again at our next staff happy hour. Now, instead of just dreading how I’ll feel trying to get the alcohol out of my system, I’ll also worry a little about what it’s doing inside my body. Just thinking about it stresses me out so much I want to grab a drink.

So what are some alternatives for a lush like me?

“Working out is probably a more positive avenue,” says Christina about dealing with work pressure. “I find as I get older, I try things like meditation courses to help me not think and stress out as much.”

Moderation is also key. “The standard guidelines for women is you shouldn’t drink more than one drink per day,  nd for men two drinks,” says Wall.

Sure, a mere one drink a day could be a buzzkill, but at least I’m at a lower risk for killing myself faster.

 This story was originally featured in our Winter 2011-2012 issue. Get yours here

Korean American K-Pop Star Embroiled in Nude Photos Scandal

Story by Young Rae Kim. 

Korean American singer Ailee has been receiving enormous attention from the Korean media after nude photos of the K-pop star surfaced on the Internet.

Allkpop, a popular New York-based K-pop website, published censored versions of the photos last night, igniting a firestorm of controversy.

There are varying accounts surrounding the scandal and fans and news agencies have questioned the credibility of the photos.

According to Dispatch, the 24-year-old singer’s ex-boyfriend approached the celebrity news agency back in July 2013 with the nude photos and attempted to sell them. Dispatch reportedly spurned the offer, questioning the legality of such a sale.

Ailee’s agency, YMC Entertainment responded to the allegations and confirmed that Ailee was the person in the photos.

“We’ve confirmed that those photos were taken for camera test after Ailee received a model casting offer for a famous American underwear company while she was living in the U.S.,” said YMC Entertainment in an official statement. “Ailee was told that she needed to take the nude photos for an accurate examination of her body, and she agreed to take them under the belief that since it was for a famous underwear company, all information would be secure.”

After the underwear company completely cut off ties with the singer, she became worried and contacted the police. Her agency went on to say that the police informed Ailee that she and several other models, had been involved in a scam. However, since there was a lack of evidence, no arrests were made. After the incident, Ailee reportedly confided in Daniel Lee, her boyfriend at the time, who is reportedly a current employee of allkpop. He asked to her to see the photos and she sent them to him via messaging.

However, allkpop recently issued a statement saying that Lee was not the person who posted the photos.

Allkpop received heavy backlash for breaking the story, and many K-pop fans were trying to rally support to boycott the website.

Fellow K-pop stars have also been supportive of Ailee. Korean American and Canadian American K-pop stars such as Jay Park, G.NA and Amber have all unfollowed allkpop on Twitter in support of Ailee.

G.NA posted an Instagram photo with the quote, “Often it’s the deepest pain that empowers you to grow into your highest self” and added “Amen. Be strong.”

YMC Entertainment said it plans to take legal actions against the person who leaked the photos.

Ailee grew up in New Jersey and started her singing career on YouTube. Her powerful and soulful covers began to gain popularity over the web and she was recruited after an audition in 2010, and moved to Korea.

This story was originally published on iamkoream.com 

The Princess and the Physician: Review of Diana

Story by Ada Tseng.

Naomi Watts and Naveen Andrews star in Diana, released November 8, a biopic about a secret love affair that the Princess of Wales had with a British Pakistani heart surgeon before her untimely death in 1997.

The 2013 film Diana, directed by Oliver Hirschbiegel and based on Kate Snell’s 2001 book Diana: Her Last Love, begins with the camera following Diana into different rooms and down corridors of the exquisitely-decorated palace where she lived alone after her separation from Prince Charles. Because we don’t see her face, there’s not only a sense of mystery but also a foreboding feeling, especially in a moment when she stops abruptly to look to see if anyone’s following her and we’re not sure why.

It’s a fitting beginning for a real-life inspired film in which we already know the tragic ending: the paparazzi chase that ended in a 1997 car crash that killed both Diana and her rumored lover, Dodi Fayed. While it was the biggest media story of the time, most assumed that Fayed was the only man in the picture, and it wasn’t until later that it was revealed that Fayed may have been more of a fling. That the man she was actually in love with was Dr. Hasnat Khan, a British Pakistani heart surgeon that she had secretly been dating for two years until they broke up in June 1997. She passed away in August.

The story of a secret love between a doctor who fiercely valued his privacy (Khan has still refused to talk about their relationship publicly, over 15 years later) and one of the most famous women in the world is the subject of this film, which takes place in the last few years of Diana’s tumultuous life.

di 2

Diana plays a little bit like an earnest teenage romance, for better or worse. The moments of sneaking around inspire the giddiness akin to sneaking out of your bedroom at night to meet your high school crush. She dons a long brunette wig so she can go out in public without being recognized, her cover story for seeing Khan at the hospital is that she is there visiting patients in need, and at some point she climbs over a back fence avoid paparazzi at Khan’s front door and tears her pantyhose. They share quotes from literature with each other; to his surprise, she knows one from the Quran that she learned as she was doing research for one of her previous diplomacy trips.  There’s even a moment where she screams his name from the street outside his place, hoping he’ll stick his head out of his two-story window.

 

Symbols, while appreciated, are displayed wrapped in adorable bows. The heart surgeon believes that you can die of a broken heart. The princess haunted by dreams of falling (being dropped or flying, defined differently depending on her feelings about love at the time), wonders if anyone will be able to catch her. And Khan’s love for jazz music, which Diana is excited to explore, ultimately represents the importance of improvisation outside of the princess’ otherwise structured life.

 

di 3

 

Overall, Naomi Watts successfully captures familiar mannerisms of the Princess of Wales, and Naveen Andrews (Lost, The English Patient) is as dashing as ever, as the dapper physician who quickly captures her attention at the hospital. It’s easy to see why she’s taken by the serious-minded, career-focused man who is generally very contained except in the fleeting moments when he dares to dream that they can meld their completely-opposite lives.

But Diana shines most in the moments when the film dabbles (albeit lightly) into the complexities of their relationship. The princess visits Pakistan to seek Khan’s Muslim skeptical family’s approval, and while she eventually wins them over (the princess can win anyone over), it’s not so simple. He cannot marry her without marrying the entire world. At one point, while his family member doubts Khan will be able to continue to practice normally as a surgeon if he marries her and tells him he has to choose, he jokes that Khan marrying Diana would be great for Pakistan! The doctor might love her, but is that enough? The fact that we might never know is what makes this story of star-crossed lovers perfect fodder for a dramatized Hollywood movie.

Diana opened on November 1 and is playing worldwide. For more information, go to the film’s official website.

 This story was originally published on asiapacificarts.usc.edu

Super Junior Celebrates Anniversary with Cosplay Blowout

By James S. Kim.

It would be a bit rude, perhaps, to call Super Junior a “boy band” as the pop veterans recently celebrated their 8th anniversary. While the K-pop superstars might be a tad older now, that still didn’t stop them from embracing their quirkiness and thanking their fans by showcasing a bit of cosplay before leaving for their world tour.

Some members dressed up as Korean celebrities, including Seo Taiji, while others took it to another level, like Leon and Mathilda from the 1994 film Leon: The Professional. Shindong and Heechul arguably took the most creative liberties, as they cosplayed as “League of Legend” characters, Ahri and Lee Sin.

It wasn’t the first time Super Junior has cosplayed for their fans’ enjoyment. They went a bit more mainstream with Dragonball, Avengers and what even looks like Jet Li earlier this year. Their Avengers cosplay even includes Spiderman and Wolverine from the X-Men, which might make comic book aficionados happy.

Donghae dressed like Seo Taiji.

Ryeowook channels his inner ajumma.

Sungmin dressed up as a popular character from variety show Gag Concert.

This article was originally published by iamKoreAm.com.

Throwback Thursday: Get This Kpop Look | Girls’ Generation “I Got A Boy” Music Video

Girls’ Generation fans worldwide rejoiced this past weekend when their music video “I Got A Boy” won the Video of the Year award at the first YouTube Music Awards. This was quite the accomplishment for Asian entertainment especially since the girls were up against icons such as Lady Gaga, Justin Bieber, One Direction and Selena Gomez.

Although there were a number of haters who were ignorant to the success of Girls’ Generation, there were even more fans defending them.

Clearly, we’ve been their fans for quite some time. Today’s Throwback Thursday is dedicated to our Get This Kpop Look based on the “I Got a Boy” music video.

Continue reading to find out how you can look like these showstoppers.

 

1. The Statement Head Accessory – keep it cute, but quirky with ears, mini devil horns or spikes.


Locomo Ear Beanie – 6.99


ElSTINKO Como Pink Fitted Cap – $50.00


Pink spike headband – $8.99

 

 

2. Channel some Sporty Spice – pair an athletic piece with a crop top.

Pop Boy Crewneck – $49.00


Criminal Damage – The Criminal Varsity – $40.59

 

 

3. Have some edge with feminine flair with an embellished jacket or top.


Envy Look metal studded denim jacket – $85.00

 

3. Think big and loud: don’t neglect the neon colors or huge prints!


Neon cat ear zipper top – $24.99


Locomo vertical striped leggings – $20.15


Ice cream bar cardigan – $59.99

 

 

4. Pay  homage to Marty McFly: yes, the gaudy sneaker wedges make quite the numerous appearances in this video.


Hailey Jeans Company Lace-up Sneaker Wedges – $32.99

 

 

 

5. Finish it off with funky jewelry!


Pretty Attitude – Spike Choker Necklace – $19.95

 


Neon hoop earrings – $7.59

 

The Ultimate Cookbook: Edward Lee’s “Smoke & Pickles”

Story by Kanara Ty.

We check out the debut cookbook of the three-time James Beard finalist (Best Chef, Southeast) — and yes, it’s a culinary classic. 

When I saw that Edward Lee, executive chef of 610 Magnolia in Louisville, Ky., opened his Southern Asian fusion cookbook with an homage to a bowl of rice (“the fundamental Zen of the Asian table”), I knew Smoke & Pickles was going to be something special. For me, a clear indicator of a good cookbook is the amount of personal stories that are juxtaposed with the recipes. This is something Lee does skillfully as he takes us on a culinary journey of personal family stories (with photos and Korean superstitions) and his own relationship with the kitchen, writing, “My relationship with food developed in three stages: (1) as a memory, (2) as a history, and (3) as an ingredient.”

Lee’s voice is rather poetic throughout the book, making the anecdotes for every chapter a pleasure to read from beginning to end. (He was an English lit major at NYU.) One of the more enjoyable stories is from the chapter “Pickles and Matrimony,” where he describes how he and his wife Dianne were accepted into each other’s families through pickled cabbage: his parents first welcomed Dianne (who’s Jewish) into the family after she ate a pound of kimchi, while Dianne’s mother blessed their courtship with six jars of her homemade sauerkraut.

As for his culinary concoctions? They’re full of hearty recipes, all made with a lot of heart. For anyone who loves fried chicken, the Adobo Fried Chicken and Waffles definitely does not disappoint. Also give the Chicken-Fried Pork Steak a try — the crust is made with dried ramen noodles! There’s a lot for the kimchi lovers out there (he dedicates quite a number of recipes to kimchi), including Red Cabbage-Bacon Kimchi and Collards and Kimchi. And Lee is quite open about his love affair with bourbon, including a number of cocktail recipes featuring the dark spirit, like my personal favorite, the Kentucky Mule.

With every single one of Lee’s recipes, you can tell that he put a lot of thought into the process, learning from experimentation with different ingredients. Another thing I love about his cookbook is his non-intimidating approach: he’s welcoming and accommodating — no doubt a reflection of his Southern hospitality. Details Hardcover, $29.95, Chefedwardlee.com.

Screen Shot 2013-11-06 at 10.59.50 AM

TIPS FROM THE CHEF

1. Cilantro stems are edible! Instead of discarding them, snip the stems as you would do with chives, and add them to your dish along with the leaves for delicate crunch and added flavor. You can keep cilantro fresh for up to a week by storing it in a glass of water in the refrigerator.

2. A pinch of salt can be the difference between a good dish and a great one. Slow-cooked meats and stews change so dramatically every few minutes that it’s important to season them right before the dish is served.

3. When shopping for asparagus, be sure the asparagus tips are tightly closed, the stems firm, and the color bright green. Excerpted from Smoke & Pickles by Edward Lee (Artisan Books). Copyright © 2013. Photographs by Grant Cornett.

 

 

 

 

This story was originally published in our Fall 2013 issue. Get your copy here

Steven Yeun Writes Letter to the Thief Who Stole His Backpack

Story by Taylor Weik.

On Sunday night while the rest of America was watching the newest episode of AMC’s The Walking Dead and praying our favorite Korean Walker-slayer would live to see another episode, Steven Yeun discovered that someone had broke into his car and stolen his backpack.

The backpack contained his computer, camera, book and notebook “full of my dumb ideas that I will never use.” Yeun, who plays Glenn Rhee on TWD, uploaded a photo of his car, back window shattered, on his personal Instagram account and typed out a letter to the backpack-burglar in the caption.

hey. asshole that broke into my car. I hope you enjoy what you find in my backpack. The computer I’m sure you sell to some other idiot. great. my camera is one of my favorite cameras. it’s my ricoh. enjoy the picture that I took on there of all the beautiful people that I love. but I hope you also enjoy the picture I took of my stupid messy room. you also took my book too, you dick. I was half way through that thing…now I have to start over from the beginning. that’s just the rules. but for real what pisses me off most is that you took my notebook full of my dumb ideas that I will never use. I loved those dumb ideas. it was a constant reminder for me to do better. now I gotta write down all those dumb ideas over again. those are the rules. one particular section had some stand up jokes in there. well there goes my 5 minute set that I’ve been working on about wizards, vertigo and chocobos. you’re a dick. but I still love you.

But seriously though, what kind of a person steals from the guy who plays Glenn?

Vivian Bang Opens Up: Pet Peeves, Emotional Eating And Childhood Memories

HERITAGE: Korean American
AGE: Between 25-45 (who knows with Asians!)
HOMETOWN: Seoul, South Korea; currently in Los Angeles.
CLAIM TO FAME: Bang plays Susan Sullivan on TBS’s Sullivan & Son, the sister to Korean Irish American Steve Byrne’s Steve Sullivan. “Susan is a competent but defensive type-A control freak who is very misunderstood by her family, especially by her mom,” says Bang. “She holds a one-sided competition with her brother, the golden child.”

 

My go-to karaoke song: “Hong Kong Garden” by Siouxie & the Banshees. It’s ironic that I sing this.

Last time I cried: Just now as I’m working on the last day of Sullivan & Son for this season. I get so attached to the amazing, talented cast and crew. It takes a village to raise this baby, and now we have to say a brief goodbye.

What always makes me laugh: Harsh reality. I feel like life is always playing a big joke on us!

My go-to comfort food: Depending on sweet or savory: coffee ice cream or kimchi fried rice.

Last thing I ate: Just now, a Snickers bar to cope with saying goodbye. Ha! I’m an emotional eater; don’t judge me!

A guilty pleasure I don’t feel guilty about: I like to watch double features or sometimes three movies at the cinema on a nice sunny day.

Favorite drink: Currently, The Moscow Mule at Bar Stella.

Pet peeve: Road rage, or when people take themselves too seriously.

Habit I need to break: Sugar addiction and emotional eating.

Talent I’d like to have: Singing or any musical ability. I’m tone-deaf and lack rhythm.

Word or phrase I most overuse: Like. Ok. Oh my god. You know.

Most treasured possession: If there was a fire in my place I guess I’d grab my computer because it has all of my photos and music stored. Then some clothes? OMG.

Greatest fear: Being misunderstood … or maybe not being invited to the party? Which I face daily, ha.

Favorite childhood memory: Playing pretend war with neighborhood friends and hiding out in an abandoned yellow school bus that was parked in the bottom of the creek.

Motto: Get up and just do it. If you fall, just get up again.

What’s cool about being Asian: Family values, loyalty and much more respect for the elderly and their experiences. Also Korean is a rad language to speak. It has many words that cannot be captured in English translation. And the food? Forget it! One word: kimchi.

My job in another life: I’d have probably joined a circus and toured the world with a group of clowns. Oh wait, that is my occupation.

This story was originally published in our Fall 2013 issue. Get your copy here

Girls’ Generation Wins Video of the Year at YouTube Music Awards

Story By Taylor Weik.

K-Pop fans went wild as Tiffany from Girls’ Generation went up to receive the Video of the Year award at the first YouTube Music Awards on Sunday night.

Held at Pier 36 in New York City, the awards show was hosted by actor Jason Schwartzman and and comic-musician Reggie Watts and credits acclaimed filmmaker Spike Jonze as its creative director. The show was live-streamed to 215,000 YouTube users and viewers themselves voted on the winners for categories such as video and artist of the year and YouTube phenemonon.

Girls’ Generation beat out American pop icons such as Lady Gaga, Justin Bieber, One Direction and Selena Gomez to win the first ever Video of the Year award for their music video “I Got a Boy.” While the eight other members of the Korean female group were working back in Korea, Tiffany was there to represent Girls’ Generation and accept the award.

“To be here in the first ever YouTube Music Awards is a treat in itself,” Tiffany said, “But to win Video of the Year… this is absolutely unexpected, and exciting and altogether humbling at the same time.”

Check out the videos of their award acceptance and winning video below: